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Take Aways From This Year's Admissions

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Replies to: Take Aways From This Year's Admissions

  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 Registered User Posts: 3,016 Senior Member
    ED is a plus factor, but not that big. Remember, those ED admit rates include athletes and legacies. For unhooked applicants, ED gives an edge - but I would call it a 'big' plus factor.

    Hey, maybe all top 30 schools will start taking 75+% of their class from ED and kids will just have to figure out what college they really want to attend by 11/1 and that will scale down app counts elsewhere.
  • Sam-I-AmSam-I-Am Registered User Posts: 547 Member
    Your suggestion is not far off, @suzyQ7! On other threads has been speculated that UChicago has filled its class of '21 by taking about 75% EA/ED1/ED2. Applying ED is a "big" plus factor, as you say, at certain top schools. But one has to research carefully what the admissions offices say in this regard. For instance, Harvard is very clear that SCEA won't help you get it but Dartmouth is pretty clear that applying ED is a factor. Read what they say, listen at information sessions and ask if you are unsure before allowing your kid to apply ED. Otherwise, you may not get the "bump" you desire.
  • EyeVeeeEyeVeee Registered User Posts: 490 Member
    edited May 19
    Hey, maybe all top 30 schools will start taking 75+% of their class from ED and kids will just have to figure out what college they really want to attend by 11/1 and that will scale down app counts elsewhere.
    Attention rich folks....pick your school and then we'll open the doors to the others.

    As someone mentioned recently and I said earlier, I do think ED will continue to be a lever pulled by more and more folks. I don't think it's necessarily all bad, as what you're seeing is the non-Ivy/Stanford top 25 become more and more competitive earlier. That alone isn't good, but I do think students balancing a lightning strike at an ivy with the risk of being shut out of a top 25 school makes the use of that bullet more strategic.

    There are huge inequities in the growth of ED, again tilted against those who need financial assistance. The strategy around ED is (for applicants / parents lucky enough to pay full price) IMO the most important decision they make in the entire process.
  • londondadlondondad Registered User Posts: 2,105 Senior Member
    edited May 19
    "Given that she had above average stats for Duke and NU (and legacy at the latter) I think she would have gotten in at one of those if she had applied ED.

    That's common knowledge around these parts. If you want the legacy tip, you need to apply Early. (Otherwise, the Adcom may logically conclude that legacy school is not number one choice.)"

    I had been led to believe that for Northwestern that the legacy gave you a leg up for RD as well (compared to a place like Penn where the adcoms are explicit about the legacy bump being for ED only). Guess we got that one wrong! :-)
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 24,428 Senior Member
    edited May 19
    ED is a plus factor, but not that big. Remember, those ED admit rates include athletes and legacies. For unhooked applicants, ED gives an edge - but I would call it a 'big' plus factor.

    Do the math. A few percent out of a small percent can be significant. For example, lets assume that ED only gives the unhooked applicant 2%* more chances. Yes, still extremely low.

    But, in a school that has a 10% admit rate, going from 10% to 12% is a 20% increase in chances. That to me, is big. Add in the fact that the top xx are extremely generous with need-based aid....like they say in the Lottery ads: 'ya gotta play to win'. :-)

    A few years ago, an Adcom at one of the Ancient Eight admitted that ED gives the unhooked a "few percent" increase. Let's say "few" = 3%. Thus, ED is a 30% increase in odds from their 10% RD rate.

    btw: Duke freely admits the fact that ED is a 'big' (my word, not theirs) bump for the unhooked.
  • Daisy192Daisy192 Registered User Posts: 40 Junior Member
    I totally agree with @roycroftmom this thread was not sour grapes at all just people trying to figure out based on the stats their kids had WTH happened! It's was good to have people validate the fact that I wasn't going nuts alone and that this admission cycle IMO seemed to be VICIOUS! My take was that ED did better than RD based on what I've seen at my D school. As I've stated before, I've done this four previous times and I've never experienced the kind of stress associated these days with getting into a decent college and after all that work to only be accepted to schools that she would have gotten into anyways. If anything I blame some GCs who for what ever reasons tell these kids they have a better than decent shot at the Ivies or top 25 Schools, instead of concentrating on the for sure you're getting in and small area colleges first then choosing one or two dream schools to throw your hat in the ring. If you get in its gravy, if not you'll live. That's what I did with the first four and had way better results with less effort. So go ahead CC Community VENT!
  • EyeVeeeEyeVeee Registered User Posts: 490 Member
    But, in a school that has a 10% admit rate, going from 10% to 12% is a 20% increase in chances. That to me, is big. Add in the fact that the top xx are extremely generous with need-based aid....like they say in the Lottery ads: 'ya gotta play to win'.

    A few years ago, an Adcom at one of the Ancient Eight admitted that ED gives the unhooked a "few percent" increase. Let's say "few" = 3%. Thus, ED is a 30% increase in odds from their 10% RD rate.

    That's not how math works....an increase of 2% increases your chances by 2%. To your point though, ED greatly enhances your chances as the true RD rates are below those of combined ED/RD rounds. Here are the actual facts for a school for the class of 2020.

    Application Plan / Applications / Admitted / Enrolled
    Early Decision I / 365 / 165 (45%) / 162
    Early Decision II / 213 / 75 (35%) / 72
    Regular Decision / 4652 / 1124 (24%) / 241
    Overall / 5230 / 1364 (26%) / 475

    The ED1 apps had nearly double the acceptance rate, while the RD kids had a lower than overall chance.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 63,578 Senior Member
    Of course, no college reveals its ED versus RD admission stats including strength of applicant pools and how many special applicants like recruited athletes are in the ED pool. If those were accounted for, ED would likely be revealed as a smaller boost than it appears from just admission rates.
  • EyeVeeeEyeVeee Registered User Posts: 490 Member
    ^ if you did that way, your unhooked kids would have a lower acceptance rate in RD. The only guarantee is that they are going to have a football / soccer / field hockey / etc... team.
  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,819 Senior Member
    "My takeaway from this year is that those without hooks (whatever they might be) need to aim lower and ED at colleges ranked 11 thru 25 or so."

    Agree on the takeaway that you do not want to be playing Powerball. By which I mean RD at a school that fills one third to one half of its seats via ED. But the ED zone is really more like 7-20 (roughly Duke through Emory).

    The related takeaway is that missing the target with your ED silver bullet/golden ticket/flaming arrow can make your admissions experience miserable. We knew several smart kids who were terrified they wouldn't get admitted anywhere all the way into late March.

    So if your are going to ED, really try to make it count. And back up your ED bullet with some EA applications to the extent allowed by the rules. Or just lay off ED and aggressively play EA where you are allowed to.

    Also, the size of the ED bullet really varies among schools. Yuge at Penn and Duke, not so big at Brown.

  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 63,578 Senior Member
    northwesty wrote:
    The related takeaway is that missing the target with your ED silver bullet/golden ticket/flaming arrow can make your admissions experience miserable. We knew several smart kids who were terrified they wouldn't get admitted anywhere all the way into late March.

    They applied to all-reach lists?

    What ever happened to having a safety that is known to be assured admission, assured affordability, and otherwise a school that one likes? Or are too many students and parents caught up in exclusivity-seeking such that any school that is not a reach is undesirable?
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 1,720 Senior Member
    Am I the only one that finds this thread to be nothing but sour grapes from those who feel that their student was somehow wronged because they didn't get into an Ivy+? My gosh! Such ridiculous statements being passed off as universal truths by a vocal minority. Move on folks. Your kids will do great wherever they will be attending. No one is entitled to an Ivy+ admission. Sorry your child wasn't in the >60% of whites admitted and has to settle for a mere top 25 school (cry me a river).

    The intellectual laziness/dishonesty reflected in this post is incredibly ironic on a site dedicated to higher education. Though I guess if it fits with an agenda or worldview those things become less important.
  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,819 Senior Member
    We all agree what's going on. Assume a kid is competitive for Stanford. Shoots and misses in SCEA.

    Sure that kid can certainly apply to some back-up schools like a Pitt.

    But will be waiting a long time to hear and will have lower odds at a lot of the ED zone schools that the kid would be very competitive for -- Duke, NW, Penn, Vandy, WashU, Emory, Tufts, Rice, etc.

    So the miss at Stanford creates a lot of uncertainty for a long time.

This discussion has been closed.