Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.
Please take a moment to read our updated TOS, Privacy Policy, and Forum Rules.

Reality hitting my rising senior in the face now!

toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 614 Member
Even though we said the words many times, she acknowledged her understanding and claimed she learned from watching the errors of the older siblings... sigh-- alas not so much.

My aspiring nursing or physician assistant student has an unweighted 3.44 GPA at the end of her junior year and a 24 on the ACT. She is starting ACT prep to try and improve that which I have no issues doing for her -- sometimes these tests are tricky to take.

I kept telling her she needed to up that GPA, she kept claiming she was trying her hardest (no I don't actually believe that but it is neither here nor there really) and now here we are paying the piper -- well here SHE is not me.

She seems to want to move toward PA, but the direct entry programs are very pricey, her GPA is on the cusp of acceptance to them let alone any merit $$ so most of them are out for our family who will have 3 in college when she goes. And for the competitive programs where you have to apply at the 4th or 5th year I am not clear how 3.4 'trying her hardest' in high school expects to get a spot where 1000 kids are competing for 50 places.

Did I mention I was tired?? :(
«134

Replies to: Reality hitting my rising senior in the face now!

  • boudersbouders Registered User Posts: 1,818 Senior Member
    You might want to discuss studying an Allied Health program at a community college with her.
  • blossomblossom Registered User Posts: 8,062 Senior Member
    Hugs toomany. Lots on your plate these days!

    Agree with Bouders- there are SO many health care careers that are not PA's. Kids get locked into a certain job title because it conveys serious/respectable/able to earn a living, and then they can't see the forest for the trees. And if she can support herself for a few years in radiology tech or phlebotomy or PT assistant or LPN and get serious about knuckling down academically- what's so bad about that? PA and nursing will still be there!

    Has she tried the SAT?
  • bhs1978bhs1978 Registered User Posts: 289 Junior Member
    "And for the competitive programs where you have to apply at the 4th or 5th year I am not clear how 3.4 'trying her hardest' in high school expects to get a spot where 1000 kids are competing for 50 places"

    By her 4th and 5th year her high school GPA means nothing. If she can't get in any direct entry programs she can go to a good state university and do her best to get the GPA and prerequisites required to get into a program.
  • SybyllaSybylla Registered User Posts: 1,445 Senior Member
    I think the CC option is more appropriate. Can she do an ASN at CC in your state?
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 614 Member
    She is probably fine to do BSN at Rutgers Camden (and can live at home) -- but PA may not be in the cards.
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 614 Member
    edited July 13
    @bhs1978 I don't mean her HS GPA, what I mean is when she is in year 3 of college, how is her college GPA going to be competitive for the spots if she can only muster 3.4 in high school. I am not sure I want to 'chance' that she won't get into a program to finish the PA -- or one we can afford. If she goes BSN direct it will be more sure. I know she could mature and change but to date she is a 'do what you need to get by and no more' kid-- though she denies that it is absolutely true.

    She was a competitive figure skater for years, and she love skating but still when the going got more tough she tended to do only what she HAD to do - the key to winning was repeating your program man many times -- all the way through, and she did that begrudgingly and only when pushed by her coaches -- she tends to approach school so far as I can see the same way. It is going to take more than that to succeed in PA school.
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 614 Member
    @blossom Parenting teenagers is not for the faint of heart! -- She did try the SAT and didn't do great on that either. She got a 1090 -- on the ACT she got the best score on the STEM section (25) and the reading section (26) - but only 21 on the English
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 614 Member
    @sseamom Thank you for the suggestion, I will look into it -- suggestions are welcome!
  • twogirlstwogirls Registered User Posts: 5,853 Senior Member
    edited July 13
    With that GPA and test score she can attend an instate school and pick a health science type major. She can complete her nursing prerequisites either in college ( this may be hard) or after graduation at a local community college ( still hard, but doable if she works). If she can maintain a GPA around 3.3-3.4 while in college.... And completes the nursing prerequisites.... There are 15-18 month accelerated BSN programs she can apply to who will accept her with that range of GPA. I know 2 kids so far just like your daughter who went this route.

    She can also apply to some of the nursing programs, X-Ray tech etc at your community college. Some of these programs are hard to get into and may have wait lists.

    PA programs are not realistic right now.
  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens Registered User Posts: 614 Member
    edited July 13
    @twogirls I think she can do the 3+1 program at our community college and get there as an option for sure. I agree about the PA -- it is so hard when you try and try to tell them and they just.don't.get.it

    That said, it looks like a fair number of people get their degree (4 year) and work in healthcare and then go to do the PA (can be 18 months up to 2 years depending). That is always a possibility too if she really figures out she has to buckle down.
  • twogirlstwogirls Registered User Posts: 5,853 Senior Member
    Also... Keep in mind that all of these 15-18 month accelerated nursing programs are different in terms of prerequisites, ease of admission, etc. It is very important to look closely at each one and decide which ones are the most realistic in terms of admissions requirements and completing the necessary prerequisites.
  • CheddarcheeseMNCheddarcheeseMN Registered User Posts: 2,407 Senior Member
    Toomany- you don't need to tell her. She's got a guidance counselor, no? Encourage her interest in health careers (or anything else she might decide she's excited about) and let the "market" do its thing.

    This. Make sure she is in touch with advisor and make sure she has a robust set of safeties. That is it.
«134
Sign In or Register to comment.