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Anyone else feel like it's time to tell expensive colleges "ENOUGH!" (CC Newbie Rant)

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Replies to: Anyone else feel like it's time to tell expensive colleges "ENOUGH!" (CC Newbie Rant)

  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,812 Senior Member
    Correct. A much lower percentage of Euro kids attend college as compared to the U.S.

    In addition, "free" college in Europe does not typically include room and board. Most European colleges don't have dorms. Most kids live at home and commute. Or they pay for their own food and lodging.

    And the European college "experience" is extremely bare bones as compared to the U.S. No dorms, no dining halls, no sports teams, no student rec centers, etc.

    "Free" college in Europe is relatively similar to a commuter community college here in the U.S.
  • cobratcobrat Registered User Posts: 12,285 Senior Member
    edited August 10
    Or they pay for their own food and lodging.

    And the European college "experience" is extremely bare bones as compared to the U.S. No dorms, no dining halls, no sports teams, no student rec centers, etc.

    This is overstating things in the other direction. Some countries such as Denmark actually pay a living stipend for university students on top of free tuition.

    Also, university students get special discounts and even heavily subsidized rooms/apartment blocks earmarked for them which makes rooming substantially cheaper than market rate(Granted you'll be commuting further, but that's part of their dorming experience and not unlike a friend's commute from his distant frat house to MIT during his undergrad). And in many cases, you will have your own room to yourself.

    And European universities DO have dining halls which serve what several former European and American colleagues who attended recount as a reasonably good substantial meal comparable to a mid-end restaurant for an exceedingly nominal price(It's currently 3 Euros in German universities). One downside is that those halls do get crowded as a result.

    I don't know too many places...especially in NYC and other urban areas where one can get a good substantial mid-end restaurant meal for $5-6.

  • exlibris97exlibris97 Registered User Posts: 775 Member
    @prof2dad In the case of Harvard and Princeton, they are NOT expensive for upper middle income families. You have to have an AGI substantially more than $200K a year to pay more than 10%. The vast majority of Americans do not make anything more than that.

    But as has been said before, you don't have to go to an expensive college. 95% of Americans don't.
  • prezbuckyprezbucky Registered User Posts: 3,512 Senior Member
    @Studious99

    Re: 21

    Admit rate is worth only 1.25% (0.0125) of a school's overall score in the USNews ranking. (it's 10% of the Student Selectivity category, which altogether is 12.5% of the total score. The other factors in the SS category are 1. test scores and 2. the percentage of enrollees who graduated in the top 10% of their HS class.)

    I agree in principle with much of what you said, but if schools are trying to game USNews, dropping the admit % won't do much.
  • NashvilletoTexasNashvilletoTexas Registered User Posts: 148 Junior Member
    edited August 11
    In the case of Harvard and Princeton, they are NOT expensive for upper middle income families. You have to have an AGI substantially more than $200K a year to pay more than 10%.

    Where do you get this information @exlibris97 ? I just put in $200K in Harvard's net price calculator with NO assets and didn't get anywhere close to 10%. Came out to about $44K/year.

    *edited to acknowledge the OPs point in the following post. This thread is not about net price at the *elite* colleges, but about the real/perceived value across the spectrum of expensive colleges.
  • rwmannesqrwmannesq Registered User Posts: 138 Junior Member
    Don't know why Harvard keeps getting mentioned in this thread. Not even close to being on point.
  • Sue22Sue22 Registered User Posts: 4,484 Senior Member
    From the OP:
    If the college is going to cost $250,000+ for 4 years, why aren't we just setting our kids up in a business.

    I knew someone whose parents did just this in the 80's. They gave her the choice between money for a business or 4 years of college. She chose the business, a franchise of the wealthy father's business, which being 18 and without any training in business or economics or substantial industry or managerial experience she proceeded to run into the ground despite her best efforts. Dad had to take over to prevent a total collapse. After that 4 years of college seemed like a better investment.
  • rwmannesqrwmannesq Registered User Posts: 138 Junior Member
    edited August 11
    @Sue22: Your post reflects my thoughts and expectations. And buying him a house/condo presumes he wants to live in one single place or that he can somehow figure out the business of renting it out. No real options other than college. Grumble, Grumble, etc
  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek Registered User Posts: 3,736 Senior Member
    It doesn't have to be a $250,000 for 4 yrs' college. There are plenty of options that come in around $80,000 for 4 yrs, and some even less. Truman State is an example of a more affordable smaller school. http://www.truman.edu/admission-cost/cost-aid/tuition-costs/ (and they offer automatic scholarships.)

    Researching schools can yield affordable options. Grumbling? Why bother if you don't take action to change the outcome?
  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 4,199 Senior Member
    @rwmannesq I have offered my kids the difference. Go to SUNY, when you graduate you have $50-60k to fund your first film... or house. S1 said no. Let's see what the filmmaker S does.
  • foobar1foobar1 Registered User Posts: 158 Junior Member
    edited August 11
    Good points. There are a range of options in colleges. However, if a student limits their search to a private "dream school" and doesn't qualify for financial aid it can be very expensive.
  • rwmannesqrwmannesq Registered User Posts: 138 Junior Member
    edited August 11
    @foobar1: There's an "or" that should be in there....

    ...or if circumstances dictate that the smaller private schools (even if not "dream schools") are the best fit for the particular student, maybe there's room to grumble a little.

    The state options really aren't for everyone, though generally I agree with all of you on this point. S20 won't be part of this particular rant. :)>-
  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,812 Senior Member
    "...or if circumstances dictate that the smaller private schools (even if not "dream schools") are the best fit for the particular student, maybe there's room to grumble a little."

    Oh come on.

    As all CC-ers know, the smaller private school is the king of the deep discount (aka merit aid). All CC-ers also know that the merit aid goes to the above average students. Luckily, every kid is above average somewhere.

    I had a low, a medium and a high academic kid, and all three of them went to smaller private schools on a deep discount. But obviously the school for the high kid was a lot fancier than the school for the low kid.

    Stop grumbling and start learning how to be a smart shopper. We're all here to help. :\">
  • rwmannesqrwmannesq Registered User Posts: 138 Junior Member
    Ouch! Needed that wake up call out, @northwesty.

    Seriously, for a moment, it's clear that one of our target schools will either discount the package OR we can fall back on a safety "smaller" UC.

    But I'm a firm believer that just as soon as you're happy with something, WHAM! Something else comes along and flattens you.

    So, until it really comes true, grumble, grumble, to satisfy the Karma Gods. ;)
  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek Registered User Posts: 3,736 Senior Member
    I agree with the "Oh come on" comment. It isn't even an option for most families. Their kids make do. (And like @northwesty, I have kids that are outside of the "norm" bubble, and they are amg the kids that have to make do.)

    I can't remember if you are the poster who mentioned Aspergers or not, but there are excellent programs at non-small privates that are geared to support students. Kelly Autism Program at WKU https://www.wku.edu/kellyautismprogram/collegeandcircleofsupport.php offers built in support and OOS costs would be 1/2 the $250,000 costs being tossed around.

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