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Article: "The hardest test of freshman year? Survival."

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Replies to: Article: "The hardest test of freshman year? Survival."

  • HarvestMoon1HarvestMoon1 6200 replies28 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I found this statistic surprising:
    In 2015, only a little more than half of students who enrolled in college in 2009 made it to graduation, with the largest percentage leaving after their freshman year, according to the National Student Clearinghouse.
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  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens 990 replies59 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @ordinarylives I agree -- My kids freshman experiences by the colleges are a far cry from the drop and figure it out that I had in the 1981. My current husband and I took a TON of criticism from folks (you wouldn't believe how much) when we left our respective home states, got married and brought our children to a completely different state and started a new life when they were ages 14, 15, 17 and 18 -- everyone had to make a new way, find new friends, start a new school. You would have thought by what people said to us we were sending them to juvenile hall or something. IMO it made them resilient- they all know now that it takes a bit of time but it can and will happen and all so far are having (or have had) a great college experience. (and everyone fared just fine in HS as well)
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  • MarianMarian 13183 replies83 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 2017
    @frabgot, good point.

    The dropout rates at highly selective colleges are low.

    At my own alma mater, which is tied for 14th on US News's National Universities list, 97% of freshmen return for a second year and 94% graduate within six years.

    I think that probably at least 99% of them should have been there in the first place.
    edited September 2017
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  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys 16617 replies66 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Yup the 50 percent figure has been around a long time but it feels that unless a kid is failing high school off to college they go and if they haven't even blown their own nose in their life off to college they go.
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  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston 14653 replies980 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 2017
    Yet colleges that have become more selective in the past decade and now have high retention and graduation rates are denigrated as "gaming" the system and seeking to climb the rankings.

    Someone who has a 900 SAT and a 2.5 high school GPA should likely not be going to college. Yet there are many state directional and struggling private colleges that will admit them and take their tuition.
    edited September 2017
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  • Much2learnMuch2learn 4609 replies168 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 2017
    Our high school does a good job of telling students and parents that going to a top college does not really matter, which is good for them to learn.

    However, they do a poor job of teaching them that working to achieve a solid gpa and test score still matters because there is a significant correlation between them and the student's odds of completing college. Students and parent should understand that better and earlier.

    If it even encouraged them to improve their gpa by 0.1 and their ACT by one point, in aggregate, that would have a positive impact on graduation rates.
    edited September 2017
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  • wis75wis75 13924 replies62 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Agree that not all students who go to college should. Years ago not as many chose a four year college.

    I disagree with the article stating freshmen have too many choices. Before a student starts in the fall s/he has a defined list of classes picked out with the help of an advisor.

    I also do not think college freshmen need the support level the article does. Those who are independent will thrive at many schools where there are large lectures. Others should be at other schools. We do not need to continue treating college students like the children they were.

    The part the author has right is the high school experience preparing students for adulthood. Less coddling, more decision making on the part of the student (less interference from parents in deciding classes is one thing).
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  • Much2learnMuch2learn 4609 replies168 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @wis75 "(less interference from parents in deciding classes is one thing)."

    I am interested in your experience with this. In my experience, parents being involved is a positive thing in most cases. Sure some take it way too far, but most parents are reasonable. The kids that seem to have the most difficulty are the ones with largely disengaged parents. Is your experience different from that?
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  • luckymama64luckymama64 188 replies34 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Having dropped my freshman daughter off to college about a month ago, this really hits home for us. Her school does a really good job of getting the students oriented before classes start, but the thing she finds disconcerting is the amount of time she has on her hands! We live a pretty structured life, and kids have a pretty regimented existence: school, home, sleep, start over. With only two classes a day, she has a ton of time on her hands--and no one to say, "Hey, why don't you do . . . now?" We suggested getting a planner and making an attempt to schedule her days. Are there any other tips?
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  • toomanyteenstoomanyteens 990 replies59 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @luckymama64 I guess being a student athlete my daughter is not having the 'time on my hands' experience at all!
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  • cobratcobrat 12207 replies78 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    We live a pretty structured life, and kids have a pretty regimented existence: school, home, sleep, start over. With only two classes a day, she has a ton of time on her hands--and no one to say, "Hey, why don't you do . . . now?" We suggested getting a planner and making an attempt to schedule her days. Are there any other tips?

    This really depends on the individual personality of the student as well as their experience during the K-12 stage.

    Some students require or enjoy a heavily regimented existence or having others direct how they spend most/all of their time.

    Others with more independent and/or creative inclinations tend to strongly chafe at and hate being subjected to the same.

    And most students tend to fall somewhere on the spectrum in between those extremes.
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  • Epson410Epson410 48 replies11 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited September 2017
    Agree!! Well put northwesty.
    edited September 2017
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  • Epson410Epson410 48 replies11 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Re: parent involvement: the book "Paying for the Party" says that students with involved parents who nudge them in the direction of, for example, internships, do lots better. Mentors are good, but without a mentor, better have a parent.
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  • youceeyoucee 1312 replies0 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @luckymama64 I can totally relate to the 'ton of time on her hands' feeling. That can be a hard thing to adjust to and I did not do it well my freshman year. I've been open with my kids about it and have tried to have them learn from my mistakes.

    I can also see the point about too many choices for kids. Some majors only have about 8-10 required courses the first two years. Even with an advisor, you still have to distill 100 or more classes into the ones that will help you progress. Engineers have a much more defined path so it's not as much of an issue for them.
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  • ProudpatriotProudpatriot 1538 replies12 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @DunBoyer - I have an opinion that students who are not capable of managing their time without interventions is not ready for college. Some of them may be ready in future years. Some are not college material. I have no problem with the weed out process that happens at college. One of the reasons having a college degree is an achievement is that not everyone has one. If it were easy, everyone would have a college degree.
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