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Cheap school = "trashy" dorm life?

Josie5Josie5 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
So, we are probably looking at a public university for my daughter. Is it a given that dorm life is going to have (what I consider) a high level of "trashy" behavior - - kids sleeping around (in the dorm rooms with roommates present?!) / drinking / partying? What do other conservative families / parents do - - just have their kid live at home? Our local schools aren't that academically great - - but we are considering it, because dorm life seems so over-rated / expensive.
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Replies to: Cheap school = "trashy" dorm life?

  • Josie5Josie5 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    Thank you for your honest replies. I guess partly what I meant by cost, is that in a private religious school, I might have a hope of certain behavior from the students. But of course, they are just a little more expensive than state schools. : )
    This was brought home to me when I was talking to a friend last night. She is a very strong, conservative Christian mom whose son is a freshman at Purdue. Anyway, she was talking about how certain behaviors are rampant, and I am kind of angry that in order to get a taxpayer-funded education, the kids have to put up with a lot of crummy behavior.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 63,530 Senior Member
    Josie5 wrote:
    This was brought home to me when I was talking to a friend last night. She is a very strong, conservative Christian mom whose son is a freshman at Purdue.

    Purdue seems to have the opposite of all of the factors associated with lesser college drinking listed in reply #3.
  • Josie5Josie5 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    " Residence halls are self supporting at public colleges. No taxpayer money is involved. "
    Hmmm - - wondering how this could be? The residence halls are on university land, they are university buildings, staffed by university employees, right?
    If my kid goes to a school like IU, she is required to live on-campus freshman year. So she cannot get the educational opportunities without the exposure to the trashy behavior, right?
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom Registered User Posts: 4,589 Senior Member
    UT Dallas has a reputation for the lack of a party scene. I've spoken to current students that agreed.

    OU is huge party school even though it's a dry campus. My daughter says it's mostly football weekends. She and many of her non drinking friends attend social events put on by the Baptist student group. Even though she is not Christian she feels welcome and not pressured to change her beliefs.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 63,530 Senior Member
    Re: #7

    "Self supporting" means that the revenues from the dorms (room and board charges to the students, and revenue from renting them out as hotels for conferences during the summer) covers the expenses, so that they are not otherwise subsidized.
  • chippedtoofchippedtoof Registered User Posts: 181 Junior Member
    Any thoughts as to why drinking is less in the west and south? Weather?
  • MassDaD68MassDaD68 Registered User Posts: 1,453 Senior Member
    I agree. She should have no problem avoiding it if she wants too. It just makes for a rough socialization if most get togethers involve drinking.
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