right arrow
GUEST STUDENT OF THE WEEK: AMALehigh is a rising sophomore at Lehigh University, majoring in Finance. He answers questions about academics, networking, finance, Greek life, or Lehigh in general. ASK HIM ANYTHING!
Make sure to check out our July Checklists for HS Juniors and HS Seniors. Consult these quick resources to get you started on the process this month.
As we work to adjust to the current reality, make sure to check out these dedicated COVID-19 resources: our directory of virtual campus tours, our directory of extended deadlines, as well as the list of schools going test optional this fall.

How to "live" in a small dorm room?

JustaMomJustaMom 2891 replies102 threads Senior Member
edited June 2006 in Parents Forum
Just back from Ikea and as I went through (I was looking for organizational stuff for my home office), they had room after room decorated and looking great. It was quite inspiring.

I realized it would be a great field trip to take my D to Ikea; not to buy, but to get an idea of how if done well, a small space can be lived in large.

That's all...you may now return to your regularly scheduled CC...
edited June 2006
31 replies
Post edited by JustaMom on
· Reply · Share
«1

Replies to: How to "live" in a small dorm room?

  • gsp_silicon_valleygsp_silicon_valley 1512 replies30 threads Senior Member
    Ikea has dorm room ideas for students attending ASU

    Eugene Scott
    The Arizona Republic
    Feb. 22, 2006 12:00 AM

    Few have to use their bedrooms for more than sleeping before going away to college, so making sure the often-cramped space fulfills the needs of multiple rooms can be a challenge, especially when there's a roommate involved.

    Arizona State University's Resident Life Department is turning to Ikea Tempe to help give incoming freshmen some ideas. The retailer has decorated mock dorm rooms to help prospective students see what a room in McAllister Village, a freshman residence hall opening this fall, could look like.

    "We're experts in planning in small spaces. We have good design and good function, so it was nice for students to get an idea on what their room could be," said Jackie Terry, an Ikea Tempe spokeswoman.

    Tours of the mock-up, which consist of a room for a student with a disability, a single occupancy room, and a double occupancy room, can be arranged during Talk and Tours, ASU's information sessions for prospective students.

    For the university, the hope is that if incoming students see how nice on-campus living could be, they might be more likely to live on campus.
    · Reply · Share
  • JustaMomJustaMom 2891 replies102 threads Senior Member
    4 months ago...they stole my idea!

    ;)
    · Reply · Share
  • maritemarite 21343 replies243 threads Senior Member
    Parents' decorating ideas must meet the realities of students' habits. No use buying a pretty rug: the mounds of clothes, both clean and dirty, are patterns enough in themselves.
    Nice coordinating sheets: do they actually make the beds? wash the sheets?
    Shelves: books compete with clothes for floorspace. Shelves may be used to stack dirty dishes and crockery(some from the cafeteria, to be returned at the end of the school year).
    Chair (s): Also used as repositories for books, papers, etc...

    You get the idea. :(
    · Reply · Share
  • MarianMarian 13230 replies83 threads Senior Member
    Also, if my experience at college is any indication, the few students who are interested in decorating inevitably end up with roommates on very strict budgets who cannot afford to spend any money whatsoever on room decor.
    · Reply · Share
  • scarletleavyscarletleavy 2359 replies15 threads Senior Member
    Well then couldn't they just decorate their half of the room without the room-mate?
    · Reply · Share
  • weenieweenie 5444 replies349 threads Senior Member
    marite:
    You are so right. MOST kids really don't care nearly as much as the mom does about how a room looks. If they have their favorite poster more-or-less hanging up someplace and their friends are in there too they're happy.
    · Reply · Share
  • jmmomjmmom 8916 replies168 threads Senior Member
    Yes, when I faced the reality of how my son lives, I allowed all my ideas for cute/elegant/organized storage solutions to fly out the window. Luckily, this epiphany happened before I spent any $$ on the things *I* would have wanted for *my* dorm room.

    Had I purchased any of the clever cubes/stackables etc., I'm sure they would have remained empty for the full year. In fact, there is a set of stackable drawers in his room at home - hand-me-downs from my office. Cute and organized. I put some looseleaf paper and other office supplies in those drawers. They have remained untouched by human hands for the 3 years they've been in his room. Look for supplies in a drawer?!? Alien concept. :D
    · Reply · Share
  • memiememie 113 replies3 threads Junior Member
    My D bought two matching comforters with shams to share with her roomie. She did check with her roommate prior to purchasing them just to make sure that they liked the same style/color. By owning both sets, it does not matter if she changes roommates each year; she will still be able to have an attractive room. It has worked great so far, and yes, she did change roommates for her sophomore year. Besides, she has always been one to make up her bed every day, as have both of her roomies.

    Their dorm room was not fancy, just always neat and clean with matching bedspreads. Beyond that, she put up a simple tulle swag hung with plastic stick-on hooks over the large window in their room.

    Thanks goodness they did not have bunk beds. Their beds were highly elevated from the floor, however, and they had chests of drawers and shelves that fit right under each bed. (came with the room)
    · Reply · Share
  • my-3-sonsmy-3-sons 2960 replies49 threads Senior Member
    Marite-You must have visited my S's dorm as you have it pegged perfectly, right down to the bowls encrusted with Easy Mac sitting on the shelf. :eek: LOL Fortunately, he and RM were 2 peas in a pod, a very cluttered pod.
    · Reply · Share
  • lesmizzielesmizzie - 1193 replies278 threads Senior Member
    Im not a parent...but I reccomend plastic draws..i pack a lot...i really tend to over pack..and i went to sleepaway camp...theres one way to save space and pack a lot at the same time is= plastic draws u know these sets w/ 4-5 draws they hold so much(packed about 1/2 my clothing plus my toiletries and extras needed in one! i cannot imagine what a couple of them at college could do and there real storage savers..there small but can hold a ton!) you can get get them at target and probably walmart
    · Reply · Share
  • thumper1thumper1 78275 replies3527 threads Senior Member
    Here is what has happened in our household...

    DS says "put all of the "stuff" you think you need to take with you to college in one room. Then take 1/2 of that or less with you. The rooms are small, have little storage, and you won't use most of what you think you need anyway." He packs lighter and lighter every year. DD will do her "college shopping" in our linen closet (DS did the same thing). We have towels, sheets (the jersey knit sheets my kids use fit those Xlong but X thin and narrow beds just fine), mattress pads and comforters. We even have a lot of throw rugs...and the kids both have study lamps in their rooms. They take that "stuff" with them. Both of my kids actually like the "stuff" they have here at home, and want to take it along with them. Reality check...they won't be HERE using it...it may as well go to college.
    · Reply · Share
  • PackMomPackMom 7650 replies17 threads Senior Member
    Yep, my S even told me to leave the top sheet at home because he didn't need it. They did buy a piece of carpet for the middle of the room but threw it away upon move out.
    · Reply · Share
  • thumper1thumper1 78275 replies3527 threads Senior Member
    DD is going across country to college. We are sending most linens on a one way trip. She will take older sheets and towels, but they do NOT need to come back here. We have so many sets of twin sheets (from DD and DS) that she could take two sets every year and never bring them home. Ditto towels.
    · Reply · Share
  • weenieweenie 5444 replies349 threads Senior Member
    I'm sorry - but I think it's weird to buy and own the bedding for the roommate...Glad it worked for her but I don't think it would be a commonly accepted plan.
    · Reply · Share
  • thumper1thumper1 78275 replies3527 threads Senior Member
    Back when the dinosaurs roamed (when I was a college freshman), my roommate was from a very rural part of the country. I lived in the suburbs. She actually sent me money and told ME to buy all the rugs, bedspreads, etc. (our college had linen service for towels and sheets...they even changed the linens once a week...IF they could find the bed). It was easier for me because I could get to some stores and she could not. At the end of the year, we decided not to room together. She didn't want the sets and I was transferring...so we sold them and split the money. But I will say...I think that was an exception.
    · Reply · Share
  • sybbie719sybbie719 20966 replies2052 threads Super Moderator
    Gosh, I am having a flash back moment. I remember sending DD off to college and sooo happy about ordering the XL twin sheets in all of these beautiful colors and even springing the extra $5 to have them monogrammed and the trunk that sat at the foot of her bed filled with linens and towels. One of the first pictures, she e-mails me is her and a bunch of her friends going to a toga party. In what? those same colorful momogrammed sheets.


    I purchased at least duvet covers with matching shams in addition to a bed in a bag set that had a comforter with matching shams thinking that she is going to live at school the way she lives at home (those duvet covers and shams never got used). I must have forgotten that I am the one doing all of the duvet and comforter changing in the house. Silly me.

    The roommate's mom and I should have taken a picture of how pretty the room looked on move in day freshman year, because it hasn't looked that way since. Went up for parents weekend in may, you could not even see the floor. They were not even sleeping in the room it was so much junk in there. They lived in a 3- room suite and were sleeping on the futons in their common room where it was clutter there too. Smaller room, less junk they can bring in.

    Now on to sophomore summer where D is living in house with 17 of her sisters. Mom, the twin sheets don't fit my bed, you need to send me sheets. What size bed is it. I think it is a full. In the mean time you'll be happy to know that I am using one of the duvet covers and spreading it out over the mattress along with one of my top sheets. I overnight mail a couple of sets of full size sheets. The next day she calls again, these sheets are too small but at least now I have a full size flat sheet to put across the mattress. Go back to the post office this time with queen size sheets (at this point I don't care if they really fit, they'll manage).
    · Reply · Share
  • memiememie 113 replies3 threads Junior Member
    Although my daughter's ownining both sets of bedding may seem a bit unusual to most posters, it was ideal for her situation. She lives in-state, but both of her roommates were from long distances - one from Bulgaria! Both of the roomies heartily WELCOMED the help with bedding that they did not have to ship or transport.

    I'll admit that I did the exact same thing in college. My roommate was from a distance, so I bought and owned both sets all four years. My roomie transferred after soph. year, but the bedding was still mine and a "matching set" that carried me through senior year! Back in the dark ages, at least where I went to school, most girls tried to coordinate their bedding. It's not so true nowadays though. My younger D is already saying that she will just take her favorite twin bedspread that she always uses for summer programs.
    · Reply · Share
  • MarianMarian 13230 replies83 threads Senior Member
    scarletleavy, I meant that some people want both bedspreads to be the same color. That sort of thing. Also, there are usually things in a dorm room that people split the cost of -- like a rug. But not everyone has the money to do that.
    · Reply · Share
  • scarletleavyscarletleavy 2359 replies15 threads Senior Member
    Yeah that is true. I'm planning on decorating my dorm room, but not to the extent that I'd feel the need to make my room-mate do it as well, although it would be nice to have co-ordinating or at least matching things. I guess I'll find that out when I learn who my room-mate is. I'm assuming that's one of the first things you discuss.
    · Reply · Share
  • thumper1thumper1 78275 replies3527 threads Senior Member
    I have to say...girls are probably different than boys. DS knew his roommate freshman year. They really didn't coordinate anything decorative. They were only concerned about who was bringing the fridge and who was bringing the stereo (no TVs that year). Flash forward to soph year. DS didn't even talk to his roommate before the year began except to say that he had a fridge. The roommate had a tv. That was the end of the coordination. DH and I remember walking through the dorm (coed) and seeing the nicely coordinated girls rooms on one side, and the less than coordinated rooms on the boy's side. Let's put it this way...most of the boys didn't even HAVE bedspreads...never mind ones that were the same color. My son's towels didn't even match each other. It didn't matter a bit to him. To be honest, it does NOT matter to my daughter either. Her comment...Mom...they're towels and sheets, not my clothes.
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity