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A Student Rebelling

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Replies to: A Student Rebelling

  • holychildholychild 288 replies7 threads Junior Member
    Phoofie, Thank you for sharing your own situation. I am hoping that she will take the ACT again in September. I had hoped she would have finished the ACT and been able to try the SAT. I think the best I can hope for is for her take it agin in September and improve her score to a 33. We are looking at schools where she would get in with a 31. At this point we lost the money for the April and June tests but that is nothing if she works really hard over the summer, takes the test again and improves her score. September will e her last shot to make the early action deadlines. At this point we will not even try for the SAT subject tests. We can't afford Georgetown any way.

    I am coming to the realization that if this is how motivated she is whereveer she ends up going to school is where she belongs.It would be nice for her to get meirt at some priate schools but I think with a 31 and her current grades she would likely get into one of the SUNY schools which would be afforadable. She can certainly get a great education and be successful. If she makes the top 10% of her graduating class she could even get one of the Stem Scholarships.
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  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 43109 replies470 threads Senior Member
    edited May 2019
    You could ask her to go to the June test because you paid for it - no prep requested. Just show up and do your best.
    And since it's a pain for her, treat her to a nice meal, or ice cream and a movie, or a round of minigolf, or whatever can be fun as a family outing in her honor. :)
    (Yes as a teen she'd rather not be seen with you but I'm sure she'll have fond memories of the day you decided to do z in recognition of her trying hard for College ;))
    edited May 2019
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  • holychildholychild 288 replies7 threads Junior Member
    I just wanted to check in and give an update on our current status. DC insisted on taking the June test although there was minimal additional prep. Didn’t sign up for September ACT since the motivation to prepare is just not there. We decided not to push the issue so that DC can concentrate on doing the essay and Common AP but even that is a struggle. Not very motivated to get it done before school starts. So the stats are 96 weighted GPA, 31 ACT, will have 7 APs , mostly 4s . Trying to be patient. I could use some suggestions for schools that would give merit scholarships for DC stats to bring COA at or below 30k. We will not qualify for any aid.. DC is interested in going into the medical profession. We are instate for SUNY so will apply to those . We would like to stay max 5 hours from NYC. Any general words of encouragement would also be appreciated.
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  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff 6922 replies30 threads Senior Member
    Congratulations on being done this phase. Now you have the stats to narrow down your search. Her grades , act and APs will get her into many schools. Maybe even having some credit to save some money.

    What in the medical profession is she thinking about? Evidently your Sunys make the most sense.
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  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 43109 replies470 threads Senior Member
    Juniata and Susquehanna may be within budget with merit (with a 31 will receive). She could apply EA.
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  • holychildholychild 288 replies7 threads Junior Member
    Thanks for the suggestions. I will look at those colleges. She wants to be a doctor but I am not sure she can be in it for the long haul. She may be better off as a PA or NP. What would be your suggestions for reach schools?
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  • HippobirdyHippobirdy 672 replies1 threads Member
    edited August 2019
    Reach- Colgate, Vassar. Pitt.
    Guaranteed admission BS/MD like at Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
    In general, Direct entry BSN programs like at Binghamton, Drexel, Quinnipiac, Duquesne, Temple may be a reach. (Especially ones with rolling admission and fill up).
    These may also be financial reaches.
    edited August 2019
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 6589 replies10 threads Senior Member
    She might get merit at Union but probably not enough to get to $30,000. SUNY will likely be more affordable.
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  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff 6922 replies30 threads Senior Member
    Medicine in any form will either pick her or not. What I mean by that is the first semester or two you will see what she has on a college level. Unless we're getting an incorrect picture of her. You have to have the drive and the will to improve and better yourself. Not wanting to do that now is a red flag to me. But some kids just need to get out of the house also. There are weeder classes for sure. Those will help determine her future direction. She has to understand that for medical school she needs to be the best version of herself. Getting her accommodations arranged now doesn't mean she needs to use them.. Just that they are there just in case. Things in college get hard really fast. Having the motivation to follow through is important.
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  • jym626jym626 57411 replies3010 threads Senior Member
    Agree that she will need to be a tippy-top applicant for a BS/MD program. And she will need to be... motivated. Any experience in healthcare? Shadowing? Volunteering in a hospital? Research assistant?
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 30268 replies59 threads Senior Member
    For your daughter to get into medical school or a PA program, college GRADES are crucial. PA programs are not where failed premeds go unless they bring up that gpa with additional courses. If she is going to start out in a PA program, she needs to find those programs from the onset , and apply to them to get best chance of acceptance. Or do very well in Premed program and apply to PA and/or MD programs. The advantage to a PA program is that it is less rigorous in its maths and sciences in that the students are not usually the academic caliber of premeds in most colleges. It’s very much a pre professional program. Premed is taking university courses in sciences and math that are required by med schools.

    OP’s daughter needs to do the research and be the one to commit to this marathon. She needs to understand where these options are available and what it takes to get that degree in medicine as a MD or PA

    As for joint Bachelor/MD programs, they are highly competitive. I agree the current stats give virtually no chance of admittance to them. I’ve known kids accepted to HPY who were rejected from all or most of these dual programs. The application process alone is daunting. I suggest OP research that process. It’s not one to take lightly.

    If the student wants to be a doctor, she should start out in supportive college that doesn’t break the bank and get the best grades she can, taking premed courses either there, or plan to take in some program where she can take as a supplement. Grades are the crucial thing. That and MCAT score, and she should test prep to the max for those. Regardless of what direction she goes, med school apps, nursing program, PA, grades are essential Anything else can be made up later, but a low gpa is difficult if not impossible to mitigate. You have to retake courses and bring up entire gpa to address a bad academic record.
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  • blossomblossom 10339 replies9 threads Senior Member
    There are tons of healthcare fields with great employment opportunities that are not MD or PA. There are statisticians who design protocols for clinical trials and the case managers who recruit patients for them; there are policy experts who work at the state and federal levels on funding for different medical interventions; there are communications pros who work for HMO's developing strategies to make sure that patients understand their benefits-- some patients have PhD;s and others read at a fifth grade level so it's not so easy communicating with so many diverse populations. There are social workers who work in hospitals helping vulnerable patients who are being discharged arrange the right kind of home support, and there are financial experts who consult with hospitals and clinics on ways to improve their cash flow or cut costs. There are fundraisers who work with foundations and corporations to pay for innovative programs to bring dentists and hygienists on mobile vans to inner city schools where some kids have never seen a dentist, and graphic designers who work at pharmaceutical companies to develop more user friendly guides to make sure that patients are taking their meds correctly and COMPLETELY (huge problem with people who don't understand the instructions on their Rx).

    And of course- OT, PT, Speech, midwife.

    I think encouraging your D to think broadly about her interests in healthcare is terrific. She doesn't need to commit to medicine-- she just needs to understand that her focus and performance from Day 1 in college is going to help determine if MD is the right path, or some other. And then leave it to her.
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  • HippobirdyHippobirdy 672 replies1 threads Member
    Here is info on VCU,it is a high reach when looking at 2018 successful applicants. I think advice from others to look for targets or matches will work out better.
    https://honors.vcu.edu/admissions/guaranteed-admission/gmed-app/
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 30268 replies59 threads Senior Member
    I didn’t say anything about the caliber of students seeking PA, though I dare say their test scores are lower than thosevacceptrd to med schools. However, most of the PA programs do not have the exact same science programs that the pre meds tend to take. I’ve been going through what’s available interns of PA programs and many of them are at directional colleges and schools that do not have many pre meds. It’s the same with nursing schools in general. Johns Hopkins nursing school for example, does not have the same rigorous science courses that are offered at the school of arts and sciences for premed. My frirnd’s Daughter, when she wanted to make a bid for medical school, had to transfer from the nursing school to get the prep she needed. She had trouble with that step up. It’s not always the case, with some schools sharing a one size fits all for all health care fields preparatory classes , but there is often a distinct difference. I’ve been looking at schools like Southeastern that have PA programs— they are excellent value for payback in salaries after getting that degree
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  • holychildholychild 288 replies7 threads Junior Member
    Colgate would be too expensive. As always, you have all given me a lot to think about. She has volunteered in a hospital for over a year and likes it. I think a school like Seton Hall may be a match for her. Would you consider Case Western and American reaches? Both give merit scholarships and appear to have strong pre-med programs/advising.
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  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 43109 replies470 threads Senior Member
    American is a match for stem and Case a reach :)
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  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom 10907 replies232 threads Senior Member
    edited August 2019
    Explore Health Careers

    Searchable database of all sort of health-related professions--from physician/surgeon to clinical social workers to techs of all sorts to medical device/pharmaceutical sales to hospital administration.

    While a 31 ACT does not in any disqualify your D from potentially applying to medical school, her reluctance to prep seriously for standardized exams is worrisome. The MCAT is a 8 hour long beast of an exam that requires substantial practice & preparation to do well on.

    And my caveat to every hopeful pre-med--
    with more than 60% of applicants getting rejected every year, your D needs to have a Plan B career in mind during college and take steps so that she's not going to be one of the bio grads with poor or no employment prospects if she doesn't get a med school school acceptance.

    P.S. there has been substantial discussion recently about changing the structure and format of medical school so who knows if med admissions will work the same way 5+ years from now.
    edited August 2019
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