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High End Dorms

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Replies to: High End Dorms

  • lostaccountlostaccount Registered User Posts: 5,012 Senior Member
    No. But some schools have started to market their schools as if they were camps. And I don't mean the type of places some families have that are rustic places by lakes. I mean the type of camps the wealthy who live in some cities send their kids to for 6-8 weeks/summer where they get the best of the best for 1K a week. It's the 18 year old mentality that will make decisions about which school to attend. And those from wealthy families are used to swank.
  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 Registered User Posts: 3,699 Senior Member
    @gwnorth - I also assumed most schools had tiered housing, especially for off campus rentals. DD's school has tiered housing even for on campus - prices range from quads with no A/C to singles with private baths and A/C. There are probably a dozen options in between. Whether or not you get your preference is something else entirely.
  • maya54maya54 Registered User Posts: 1,739 Senior Member
    edited January 7
    “I mean the type of camps the wealthy who live in some cities send their kids to for 6-8 weeks/summer where they get the best of the best for 1K a week.”

    I guess there may be camps like that but probably much more expensive. My kids private camps which cost more than 1000/week and were typical of those that most kids went to in our wealthy community attend which are nothing like the high end dorms of college. They were very rustic, with tiny crowded dorms. Indeed they were so claustrophobic that I couldn’t stand to be in there on a visitor weekend. Campers were responsible for all the cleaning, including toilets and showers. The grungiest dorms I saw were way way nicer.

    The majority of kids here attended these 6-8 week camps. None would be “sold” by marketing promising a “camp like” experience.
  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins Registered User Posts: 672 Member
    edited January 7
    It’s surprising that colleges with a combination of nice new and crappy old dorms, doesn’t care if you are paying $75,000 or $0. As donors can buy seats in admissions, one would think dorm assignments would also have a price tag. Even though it sucks for full pay students, it prevents classism in colleges. Probably some influential parents do pull strings to get desired rooms but hopefully it’s not a common practice to prioritize room assignments.
  • maya54maya54 Registered User Posts: 1,739 Senior Member
    edited January 7
    “It’s surprising that colleges with a combination of nice new and crappy old dorms, doesn’t care if you are paying $75,000 or $0. As donors can buy seats in admissions, one would think dorm assignments would also have a price tag. Even though it sucks for full pay students, it prevents classism in colleges. Probably some influential parents do pull strings to get desired rooms but hopefully it’s not a common practice to prioritize room assignments.”

    What’s really surprising to me is that at UMich ( where students are randomly assigned except for those in LLC or honors and pay the same price no matter what) the nice new dorm is NOT the one the social wealthy kids want. Instead most hope for one of the oldest and frankly most disgusting dorms. Why? Because it’s freshman only and has a reputation at being very fun and social. My D showed me messages in a social media group where wealthy kids were offering to pay others to trade with them so that they could live in this horrible dorm. The beautiful new dorm was considered a “ bad” assignment by those super social seekers.
  • milee30milee30 Registered User Posts: 1,666 Senior Member
    edited January 7
    "What’s really surprising to me is that at UMich ( where students are randomly assigned except for those in LLC or honors and pay the same price no matter what) the nice new dorm is NOT the one the social wealthy kids want. Instead most hope for one of the oldest and frankly most disgusting dorms. Why? Because it’s freshman only and has a reputation at being very fun and social. My D showed me messages in a social media group where wealthy kids were offering to pay others to trade with them so that they could live in this horrible dorm. The beautiful new dorm was considered a “ bad” assignment by those super social seekers. "

    UChicago has some similar oddities in what is considered a desireable dorm. It also has a range of ages and conditions - from 100+ year old grubby dorms that don't even have A/C to brand new dorms. Due to overcrowding, they even leased some very nice, upscale private condos in a brand new luxury development. You'd think the luxury condos would be the first to book up, but they were so unpopular that housing had to offer a $1500 discount for people to go there. Why? Location and lack of residential house culture. They're a few more blocks from campus (still in a decent area) and not known to be social. The first dorm to book up most years is that old, super grubby no AC dorm; it's in a great location and is known to have interesting (weird), quirky types that always win the big Scav event. Not to say that the new dorms aren't popular, they are, but they appear to be chosen by students primarily for where they are located and the other types of students living there. Bottom line - many students seem to value location and house culture more than they value new dorms with updated amenities.
  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 Registered User Posts: 3,699 Senior Member
    No one tends to want the singles w/private baths at DD's school either. It tends to be international students or upperclassmen, and freshmen who did get assigned there had parents complaining up a storm. Also agree that location is a big deal too.
  • tutumom2001tutumom2001 Registered User Posts: 1,004 Senior Member
    edited January 7
    Yup, old two-person dorms with communal baths rule here as well for the same reasons that maya54 mentioned: closer to the middle of campus, freshman, single-sex, fun and social. The new dorms have been allocated as learning communities for the honors students, aka "nerds." (But, as a nerd, I wouldn't want to live in them either - they are smaller and have itty bitty windows and they are on the edge of campus. The older dorms are slightly larger with those mid-century modern walls of windows.)

    The dorms in the original article are the result of a public-private partnership. Perhaps one solution is for the developer to allocate a percentage of dorm rooms to kids on financial aid at reduced costs similar to section 8 housing in the "real" world.
  • gwnorthgwnorth Registered User Posts: 235 Junior Member
  • gpo613gpo613 Registered User Posts: 158 Junior Member
    I think it is lazy for the college and short-sighted. They could have spent $100M to build a new dorm. Once it is paid off then it is a serious income generator. Think fully owned rental property. Now they will just get a small amount from leasing the land.

    Plus I don't like the tiers for the students. Once on campus all students should be equal.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 72,950 Senior Member
    gpo613 wrote:
    I think it is lazy for the college and short-sighted. They could have spent $100M to build a new dorm. Once it is paid off then it is a serious income generator. Think fully owned rental property. Now they will just get a small amount from leasing the land.

    However, if the college does not have the $100M up front (or capability to borrow such) and/or does not want to take on additional risks (e.g. not being able to fill it up with paying tenants), leasing the land for private dorms may be a lower risk option.
  • kiddiekiddie Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    Her last semester, my daughter lived in what was then the most expensive dorm room available at Northeastern. It was a huge single with full kitchen and bath in a fairly new building. We could afford it and she had had it with roommates and suitemates. She also had sleeping problems whenever she shared a bedroom and her room selection number was 1! Her room became the place her friends hung out in (she ended up with custody of the TV and video game system). I think it was the right choice. None of her friends cared who dormed in which priced rooms. Many of her friends spent most of their college life in the very inexpensive dorms (4 to a suite in an older non-AC building) or in dumpy Mission Hill rentals.
  • RightCoasterRightCoaster Registered User Posts: 2,572 Senior Member
    I will have kids at both campuses next year. I am fine with this system.

    This is how life works. Not everybody gets everything for free and/or subsidized throughout their lives. It's a good life lesson for kids to realize this. I'd like all sorts of nicer, new,fancier things in my life but I'm not expecting my neighbors to subsidize my desires. I don't think there are too many kids complaining about not being able to afford swank dorms. It seems the kids just want to learn and have fun with their friends during their 4 years.
  • Groundwork2022Groundwork2022 Registered User Posts: 1,015 Senior Member
    If my DD has an option for a single room with it's own kitchen, I will sign her up in a heartbeat. She'd agree - she loves to cook.
  • donnaleighgdonnaleighg Registered User Posts: 1,491 Senior Member
    My alma mater, Swarthmore, has the policy of same-price-for-everyone in dorms. Lottery numbers get better as you move up through the classes, so you're more or less guaranteed to have a more desirable room each year. The policy is in line with the (Quaker influenced) policy of egalitarianism. Same policy means no fees for any on-campus events such as movies or concerts. Works for me.
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