Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

High End Dorms

12467

Replies to: High End Dorms

  • scubadivescubadive Registered User Posts: 809 Member
    when I went to college the amenities were nothing to rave about. It was very simple. It has become crazy and the cost of education confirms this. Every new quad living with private bath costs money and someone is paying for it and the vast majority of America cannot pay full fare. I think its a valuable learning experience living in basic conditions to prepare for life down the road as well as the comadary.

    Now in terms of GF food, as another poster mentioned as adding cost that simply is not wheat based foods. That really is not a big deal as salad dressing should not have wheat in it. Its lurking in many processed foods. Meats, veggies and fruit dont have gluten which is what we should be eating. In many cases its for medical reasons and the ada protects those students from discrimination.
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 19,938 Senior Member
    But the ADA doesn't set the price of food. At a restaurant I went to recently, it was $4 extra for a gluten free English muffin. The ADA doesn't require the restaurant to make the cost the same for everyone even if it is medically necessary.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 72,949 Senior Member
    However, providing gluten free options need not be expensive. For example, if the dining hall is serving tacos, it can serve them with corn tortillas.
  • Data10Data10 Registered User Posts: 2,549 Senior Member
    edited January 9
    I don't think charging variable rates for housing is particularly rare. Searching some college websites, all I checked except HYPS... type private colleges charged variable rates for different housing. For example, NYU's housing rates are at https://www.nyu.edu/content/dam/nyu/resLifeHousServ/documents/ApplicationsandAssignments/AY2018-2019PropHsgRatesUpdate.pdf . Freshman could pay $8k.year for a triple in Rubin, which is not air conditioned; or they could pay $19k/year for a private suite/loft in Third North.

    While HYPS... often did have a flat rate for undergrads in spite of having very different housing quality in some cases, they often had more variability in pricing among graduate housing. For example, Stanford's graduate housing rates are at https://rde.stanford.edu/studenthousing/rates-billing#Grad . Housing costs vary from $795/month to $2975/month (max $2100/month for single students).

  • Leigh22Leigh22 Registered User Posts: 155 Junior Member
    #34 - exactly.
  • blossomblossom Registered User Posts: 9,159 Senior Member
    I think grad housing is a completely different animal, Data. I have a nephew who has just gone back to grad school. he has a spouse with a job; it was worth it to them to be in the more expensive grad housing option because the parking, location, etc. made it more convenient for the non-grad student to get to work in the morning.

    Not the same dynamics as with an undergrad- we're talking about a student who is almost 30 years old! Not especially worried about his social integration on campus.....
  • hopewhite25hopewhite25 Registered User Posts: 178 Junior Member
    At Duke, there are many different types of dorms for Freshman, from the really old cool buildings, to the ones built 10-15 years ago, all the way to the fancy hotel style dorm that just opened that has double beds, as opposed to the Twin XL (the rooms are HUGE). And yes, the rates are different, depending on which dorm you are in, and whether it is a single or a double. But, if you are on financial aid, the grant aid will rise to cover the cost of the dorm. The students are placed into random housing, so you really do not have a say into which dorm you are placed into. Same things goes for when you move onto West campus the subsequent years.
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 12,070 Senior Member
    @hopewhite25 if you are on financial aid, the grant aid will rise to cover the cost of the dorm. The students are placed into random housing, so you really do not have a say into which dorm you are placed into.

    That's interesting - so if not on FA, you don't know the cost of your room and board? But if you get even minimal FA you pay the same thing every year?

    I think FA should cover housing in situations where students cannot control that cost, and probably even when they can, but I'd never heard of lottery housing with different prices. Goes to show there an infinite number of ways colleges handle this, I guess.

    I'm a fan of the residential one-price lottery/seniority system because I see how that works well for a LAC trying to build a tight community of students. Less useful for a large U that is perhaps trying to build smaller communities of students within the larger institution. I also know some LACs do variable pricing based on single/double, suite, etc. but I am not a fan.
  • hopewhite25hopewhite25 Registered User Posts: 178 Junior Member
    @OHMomof2 From what some of the moderators on the Class of 2022 Facebook page have said, it is implied that Duke does not charge the differential housing price for the first year, since there is no say in which dorm you live in. However, the website does state different prices for regular singles and doubles on East Campus versus Premium singles and doubles. Our bill just shows housing, so it could be true, but we are not full pay, so that could be the reason. My daughter is in a middle of the line dorm. The only ones on East Campus that are supposed to be premium from my understanding is Trinity, which is like a fancy hotel.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 30,622 Senior Member
    "lottery housing with different prices" Sure. Prevalent enough, after first year. The better your number, the more choice you have, including whether to go for higher end/more costly. Or not.

    Add my D1 to those who weren't crazy about being in a much newer dorm. But both of mine had same cost for all choices. No premium pricing.
  • Materof2Materof2 Registered User Posts: 232 Junior Member
    A “Ritz Carlton” dorm for the silver spooners? I imagine colleges would do anything to make more $$ by charging a premium for those rooms. And they’d likely fill up every room. If this works in one college, get ready for a trend.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 72,949 Senior Member
    OHMomof2 wrote:
    I'm a fan of the residential one-price lottery/seniority system because I see how that works well for a LAC trying to build a tight community of students. Less useful for a large U that is perhaps trying to build smaller communities of students within the larger institution.

    Perhaps it matters more for colleges that try to have a more integrated residential experience living in college or college-associated housing for all four years, rather than the probable majority of colleges where only a portion of frosh (those from out of the area) live in the dorms, and almost everyone lives off campus after frosh year.
  • kiddiekiddie Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    Boston is a tough housing market, especially for students. The city wants the colleges to house more of their students but construction costs are very high. Even with new dorms (NEU has built several in recent years - IV, EV, and now this new one which they are not the owner of), schools can only guarantee housing for 1-2 years. At places like BU and NEU, the college campus is pretty much integrated with the city and living off campus has few drawbacks in terms of convenience. Also, at NEU, with it's coop program, people come and go, so students' housing needs can be fluid. You end up with students in "tiered" housing both on and off campus. Those living in fancy condos their parents bought (I only know of one Harvard grad student who has this), those living in nice dorms, those living in less nice dorms, those living in dumpy apartments in not very nice neighborhoods, those living in slightly nicer places a train ride away from campus, etc.
  • iaparentiaparent Registered User Posts: 199 Junior Member
    I never gave it a second thought that different dorms/room set ups cost different amounts. When I went to school it was a lottery of sorts but the price was differentiated based on where you ended up. Back then it was not much of a difference as the only real differences were air conditioning, # of roommates, and private bath. That said I was on a very tight budget and requested the least expensive and ended up somewhere in the middle, having to pay the difference myself. I thought this was how every place worked.

    When my son applied to my alma mater two new dorms had been built within the previous 2 years, and were obviously much nicer and more modern than 80% of the rest of the buildings. The school had gone to mandatory Living Learning Communities for the dorms so the student had to rank which communities (1-10) they wanted to live in and then they were placed in housing based on that. Again a kind of a lottery but not every community was in every dorm and some were only offered in the newest, most expensive dorms. As luck (or unluck?) would have it the community he was assigned was only housed on one floor of one dorm, the newest most expensive on campus and we definitely paid a significant amount more than if he had been assigned to one of the older buildings.
  • Data10Data10 Registered User Posts: 2,549 Senior Member
    edited January 9
    I think grad housing is a completely different animal,
    In the referenced Stanford link, there can be a good amount of overlap. For example, ~40% of Stanford engineering school majors do a co-terminal master's where they simultaneously pursue a BS and MS. Co-terms can apply for housing as either an undergraduate or graduate, and can pay different rates to live in the same housing, depending on which way they choose to apply. When I was a student and co-term, I spent one year in all freshman housing, 2 years in housing that had both grads and undergrads, and 1 year in all graduate housing. That said, I agree that a difference in cost of housing becomes less relevant the further along you are in college. There are various advantages to not separating freshman by cost of housing that decrease as upperclassmen, and further decrease as graduates.
Sign In or Register to comment.