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Pros and Cons of Public Flagship vs Private Colleges

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Replies to: Pros and Cons of Public Flagship vs Private Colleges

  • Sue22Sue22 6113 replies108 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    ^ re #220, IMO that's a GIGO article. They include graduate schools in the equation, so the Clintons, who attended Wellesley and Georgetown, are listed as graduates of Yale, where they attended law school. Warren Buffet, (U Nebraska) is listed as a Columbia grad. NYU claims Angelina Jolie, even though she dropped out after a short time.
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  • CU123CU123 3436 replies62 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @sue22 I wouldn't say its GIGO, as they decided to include graduate schools which is probably relevant. More interesting is they didn't normalize for the number of graduates each school had; that would be really telling as to which schools produce the most UHNW.
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  • Sue22Sue22 6113 replies108 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Graduate schools really skew things. For instance, the reason many people get into top business schools is that they've already made a lot of money.
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  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger 2738 replies150 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Sue22
    NYU claims Angelina Jolie, even though she dropped out after a short time.

    Dropouts are excluded from the study.
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  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 816 replies78 postsRegistered User Member
    edited May 31
    @barrons SMU isn’t really an attractive school for high achievers, neither rank nor rigor of the school is at their desired level and no free full rides either. It’s more for rich or poor average students. UT, UTD, A&M, Tech and Baylor offer better value than SMU, specially to pre-Med and engineering.

    Rice is incredibly difficult to get in as it is but more so for locals as everyone applies there and Rice just can’t fill up a class with Texas valedictorians and salutatorians, unless they are bringing more to the plate than just grades. It’s expensive too and without aid, not easy to afford.
    edited May 31
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  • ultimomultimom 131 replies1 postsRegistered User Junior Member
  • socaldad2002socaldad2002 1208 replies24 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @moooop fair enough point about size of the student body might not be an issue but was just talking with friends kid who is a junior at UCLA and she is still in some classes with 300+ students and mentioned something about attendance is optional (maybe because they don’t have enough seats?). You would think that by the time you were a junior with upper division courses the class size would be more manageable? These kinds of anecdotes concern me at our in state public universities...
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  • moooopmoooop 2205 replies17 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 1
    Depends on the university & the major, but from what I've seen, the ubiquity of the 1000-seat lecture hall nightmare is exaggerated. Yes, some classes in some majors at some schools might have those, but it's unfair & untrue to assume that's the norm. There are probably adults & high schoolers on cc who have never set foot on a state college campus, much less attended one. I'm proposing that they sometimes too easily accept the "you're just a number" at State U propaganda because it reinforces their belief that there is some sort of law of nature that makes the private superior to the public.
    edited June 1
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  • barronsbarrons 23031 replies1951 postsRegistered User Senior Member
  • Sue22Sue22 6113 replies108 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    When people are discussing public vs. private colleges we often hear about how amazing honors colleges are at flagships and the networking advantages of Ivies, but the vast majority of students do not have these as options. By definition only the top students will be offered spots at either.

    I'm interested in the advantages and disadvantages for the slightly above average kid-the one who's chosing between Eckerd and UMass non-honors or Purdue non-honors and Fordham.

    Superstars will do well wherever they go. What about the kid who doesn't come in with a laser focus on what they want to study and a gazillion credits? The one who's likely to work hard, get involved on campus, but flounder a bit along the way?

    @Correlano, this is not a response to your post, so please don't take it as criticism of any sort.
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  • itsgettingreal17itsgettingreal17 3877 replies25 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Sue22 That isn’t the average CC student and is usually not the type of student who prompts the fierce debate on here about privates v. state flagships.
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  • Twoin18Twoin18 1457 replies16 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 1
    "...was just talking with friends kid who is a junior at UCLA and she is still in some classes with 300+ students and mentioned something about attendance is optional (maybe because they don’t have enough seats?)"

    The more likely explanation is that some professors put their lectures online and so students who want to can catch up later. (UCLA is different to some other universities which have explicitly online courses that were recorded previously)
    edited June 1
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  • CorralenoCorraleno 141 replies1 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    @Sue22 It's funny you mentioned Eckerd, because that's where I went for undergrad. I was a first gen, dirt poor (EFC $0), high stats kid, and at the time they offered a full ride for National Merit, so that's where I went. I had a great experience there, although the strength of that experience was heavily dependent on one professor who became my mentor. Had he not been there, my experience would still have been overall positive, but not nearly as life-changing.

    The pros were small classes with lots of discussion, lots of intensive writing, no scantron or multiple-choice exams, lots of opportunity for independent study courses, and very little bureaucracy if I needed help (needed an increase in financial aid, needed to add/drop a course past the deadline, etc.).

    The cons included such limited course options that independent study was basically a necessity if I wanted to pursue advanced topics. I took the one or two courses that were offered in my major each semester that I hadn't already taken, and then I filled the rest of my schedule with electives and independent study. I was very lucky in having a philosophy prof take me under his wing and really push me to advanced levels of thinking and writing; there's no question in my mind that his recommendations, and the independent study courses I did with him, are what got me into top PhD programs like UCLA and Berkeley.

    I have no regrets and I think a LAC was definitely the best place for me, given that I was truly 100% on my own with no support of any kind (financial or otherwise) from family. I probably would have been lost at a huge flagship, because I just had no idea how the system worked, what the options were, or what to do if I needed help (academic, financial, logistical, whatever). However, in my case the cost of a private LAC was equal to or less than the cost of an in-state public, so I wasn't forced to choose between taking on large debt for a private school versus a cheap public option.

    D21 does not have the academic stats that S had, and doesn't have strong interests in terms of major, so in many ways she is exactly the kind of kid who is often choosing between Eckerd-level private schools and in-state publics. But she's perfectly happy with the in-state options, and isn't even considering private schools. As much as I enjoyed my time at Eckerd, I (personally) don't consider it worth an extra $150K or so compared to our public options. (No disrespect to those who choose Eckerd, especially with large merit awards, as I think it's a great school — just not worth the full COA for our family.)
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  • CU123CU123 3436 replies62 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Again kind of debating the wrong things here, the real benefit comes from what happens after you graduate. You will get the benefit of the doubt by simply saying you graduated from Stanford, because ALL students who graduate from Stanford tend to be quite accomplished. Graduating for University of Minnesota means, well, you still have to prove yourself because there is no benefit of the doubt given to you because only some graduates there are equivalent to a Stanford graduate.
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