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College Decision Day 2019 is past. How is everyone feeling? Lessons Learned?

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Replies to: College Decision Day 2019 is past. How is everyone feeling? Lessons Learned?

  • TheodenTheoden 252 replies7 threads Junior Member
    @RookieCollegeMom Where did your daughter end up?
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  • AtyrauloveAtyraulove 132 replies4 threads Junior Member
    I’m glad @Trixy34 speaks so highly of St Lawrence!!! My S19 will be attending. I’m giddy that they are simply a FAFSA school as I have a D17 at a CSS school (Smith) and it’s HARD to gather all the information each year!
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  • TheodenTheoden 252 replies7 threads Junior Member
    @browniesundae Thanks for sharing your lessons!
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  • TheodenTheoden 252 replies7 threads Junior Member
    @pickledginger Thanks for your insights. There are some schools (and they are rare) that don't tie a merit scholarship to minimum GPA while at college. Sounds like he's done well.
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  • browniesundaebrowniesundae 301 replies3 threads Member
    @Theoden You are right. DS's scholarship requires a 3.4, which was the highest we encountered (I think he will manage it - fingers crossed). DD's merit at T10 has no GPA requirement. She just needs to "remain a student in good standing". I didn't see that for any of the other scholarships she applied for.
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  • Aug2019Aug2019 201 replies15 threads Junior Member
    This article on the topic of maintaining a scholarship is old (5 yrs) but might be useful:

    http://money.com/money/collection-post/3149027/dont-lose-your-college-scholarship/
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  • browniesundaebrowniesundae 301 replies3 threads Member
    Another thing about scholarship weekends with interviews, etc. Sometimes they are mostly just a recruitment tool. For example DD18 was invited to a weekend at St. Louis Uni. When we got there we found out they were doing the program 2 weekends in a row with 200 kids per weekend -- so 400 kids for about 20ish full tuition scholarships. I had to foot the bill for travel, hotel, etc. Afterwards, I felt it was just a way to get high stats kids to visit campus and be "sold" on the school in person.

    But not all of them were like that. DS18 went to one scholarship interview weekend where they invited 70 to interview and they gave 25 full rides - and he got one! There were also a couple where the school paid for flights.
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  • gpo613gpo613 361 replies23 threads Member
    @browniesundae & @pickledginger

    Thank you for bringing up that aspect of the process. My D19 went through almost the same process you described. Luckily one of the "scholarship competitions" was local enough it did not require a hotel, but still took time. D19 did one where 300-400 kids got interviewed. The number of people doing the interview had to be 40-50 people from the university. I call it a luck of the draw situation. It only works if you click with the interviewer. We know all of them are not created equal. You are right about them being recruiting tools.

    I think by the time D19 got to doing the T20 essays she was done. Also I think she could read the tea leaves that the money would not be there. The extra merit essays are tough.

    My main advice is to have a very clear picture of what schools make the most sense by July of the Summer before senior year of HS. Narrow it down to 6-8. Understand the money and cost. That is important.
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 24564 replies19 threads Senior Member
    There are many athletes who use their sport to get into the college they really want to go to but can't afford or can't get into without a hook.

    We viewed it as a three legged stool with academics, athletics, and finances being the three legs. If all are equal, the stool won't wobble.
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  • CountingDownCountingDown 13685 replies113 threads Senior Member
    One of my nephews went where he was recruited for baseball. School 1 (junior college) didn't want him to major in engineering because of the time commitment. His ACT was much higher than their average; they weren't sure what to do with him. Transferred to School 2 (small private D-I), injured his pitching arm, never got back into their rotation and didn't want to borrow money to attend after his scholarship was reduced. Was set up to transfer to School 3 (another small D-I), but his best friend passed away in an accident. They had played baseball together since T-ball. Nephew's heart wasn't in it after his friend died. Went home and got a job in accounting. Doesn't have his degree. He's married, happy and dad to two-going-on-three boys. Have no doubt as they get older, he'll coach.

    He had gotten interest from pro scouts and decided to chase that dream by pitching in college. As with most would-be professional athletes, a lot of things can get in the way of that goal.

    I hope he goes back one day to finish the secondary math ed degree he talked about so that he can coach at his former HS.

    tl;dr -- consider the entire package. Be aware of tradeoffs. Make sure you want to attend that school if the sports piece doesn't work out.
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  • vpa2019vpa2019 516 replies10 threads Member
    @MariettaDad litigation regarding?
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  • TheodenTheoden 252 replies7 threads Junior Member
    @MariettaDad Good insights. I agree that scholarships that explode below a certain GPA aren't so hot. Sometimes a 3.0 is hard to maintain if the school is super rigorous.
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  • 1stTimeThruMom1stTimeThruMom 389 replies9 threads Member
    @Theoden @MariettaDad Let’s hope colleges are “super rigorous.” We need more grit, resilience, intelligence, and appreciation of the same.
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  • itsgettingreal17itsgettingreal17 4110 replies28 threads Senior Member
    Parents and students need to very carefully consider scholarship renewal GPA, but I wouldn’t automatically cross off a scholarship requiring a GPA higher than 3.0. Some of the best scholarships (mostly full rides) out there require up to a 3.5 to renew. Instead, ask questions of admin, parents and current students about the risk to assess whether it’s one that makes sense for your student.
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 30268 replies59 threads Senior Member
    Sigh. When an athlete is considering a school, the team, coach program IS very important. They spend a lot of time at their sport and it has to be a fit. So, it figures largely. You can’t get everything when going the athletic route, so you do try to balance things. It didn’t work out well for many athletes even keeling the balance and having options. My kid was privileged in that he didn’t need a scholarship, and was capable of doing the schoolwork , was amply academically prepared. Not always the case

    @MariettaDad, I agree with most all of what you wrote. A lot of folks I know burned with spike in OOS and R/B Hikes after first year or two. It’s important to see what the cost of upper class housing is and what options are available. At many schools, you get a double room in the freshman dorms, but after that it’s an apartment or single, and pricier. Getting off campus digs is a money saver at UBuffalo or Pitt. Not so much at USC or NYU. Take a good look at that student ghetto around the campus. It can cut down costs drastically in future years,...or not.

    That contingency plan about what to do if can’t grad in 4 years—- well, might as well face it now: if kid is a class or 2 short at the 11th hour, and I see this all of the time, the best thing to do most of the time is to bite the danged bullet and get it done with that summer. I know some hardline parents regretting they didn’t do do with kids who didn’t get degree for a semester or two of extra time at that school. They left to earn the money and life took over. That’s a reason why I really advise people to stay away from those danged loans from the get go. They may be a life saver at the tail end but not if you are already stuffed to the whazoo with loans. It can happen with even the most talented kid. Easier to deal with it the first two years. After that third year, yes, thAt money in the pot is a consideration as well as time spent. I have a kid who went back to school after a 9 year hiatus and was lucky enough to find a school that would take those old credits and get him out in less than a year. Many schools require a 2 year residence, won’t take old credits, picky about credits they take, etc. i have a friend whose son and niece were on a perpetual treadmill to get their degrees. Wasn’t going to happen with the rules in place. The shame was that the niece should have gotten her degree in 4 1/2 years from the get go but a mishap and parental tough love led to this situation
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