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Advice on education degrees - tried the education board, but may have more luck here

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Replies to: Advice on education degrees - tried the education board, but may have more luck here

  • bopperbopper Forum Champion CWRU 14472 replies104 threads Forum Champion
    If you are moving from N Cal because of cost reasons, then check out the prices in the NYC Tri-state area.Also not cheap.
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    I don't think she wants to teach in California, but maybe Oregon or Washington. She is looking at UWash (Udub)
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 82789 replies738 threads Senior Member
  • happymomof1happymomof1 30593 replies194 threads Senior Member
    Another pathway to this career would be to major in a content area, then complete an MAT program in the state where she decides she'd like to work. Often those are 12-18 months and have excellent job placement.
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  • PepperJoPepperJo 303 replies11 threads Member
    edited May 2019
    Oh Aunt Bea...
    OP asked for advice. Her daughter isn’t sure what level she wants to teach, and may or may not pursue special education. I was merely suggesting options, as my very large school district is always seeking SLPs, and pays them a premium. Ours have credentials, and work with children in a school setting full time helping to meet IEP goals. Obtaining a teaching credential does require grad school, and many programs combine it with a Masters degree. If one wants to be a highly attractive candidate, why not explore other options? Not quite sure why, but your reply to me is a little snippy.
    edited May 2019
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  • thumper1thumper1 78020 replies3499 threads Senior Member
    My opinion...The University Of Hartford is fine...but if she really wants elementary and special education dual certification from a school near there, she should look at St. Joseph’s in West Hartford...a spit from UHart. St. Joes is a very highly regarded program...and I know many well regarded teachers who graduated from there...but it is mostly women...

    Another option in CT if you are looking at CT publics is Southern Ct State University in New Haven. Again...a well regarded program.

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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    I should mention that Christian based colleges are on her list of dealbreakers, even if they have Jewish presence on campus. She just feels that she would be uncomfortable as a fairly observant Jew, which is why we would count St. Joes out. A kind of unfortunate limitation as I know there are some highly regarded institutions that fall into that category. We will look at Southern CT State. Not sure that her focus is CT, it's more mine from a) convenience to visit both kids at once and again b) possible relocation near there. That said, she is open to anywhere, so if it looks good to her, then she'll apply.
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  • EmpireappleEmpireapple 2216 replies28 threads Senior Member
    Get your degree in the state you plan to live and teach in. Avoid early childhood - it does not pay a living wage. If she likes younger kids go for elementary and make it a goal to teach in a public school (best pay).

    Consider looking for a school where she could go right on for her masters. She will need it for the best pay in the best schools. Make sure she gets her masters in literacy or special ed. in order to be marketable. Better yet - a dual.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78020 replies3499 threads Senior Member
    The College Of New Jersey has good ed programs. So does University of New Hampshire, Umass, UConn.

    If she does elementary dual with special ed, she can do a prek- grade whatever certification course of study...and she could work in an integrated preschool in a public school (special education and regular ed kids).

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  • blossomblossom 10339 replies9 threads Senior Member
    If by "fairly observant Jew" she is looking for an active Hillel, lively Jewish life, etc. there are at least a hundred colleges which rate better than Southern in that regard. And at least a hundred with more rigorous ed programs. Southern is a fine place for a kid who knows they want to settle and teach locally; it doesn't carry the same weight in Boston, NY, Providence, or Philly, all a train ride away (although in different directions).
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  • jmnva06jmnva06 846 replies8 threads Member
    Both of my daughter went to school in a different state then they they are teaching (d2 graduates in 4 days and starts working in August).

    D1 had no issues getting certified-- it was just a question of taking a couple of exams.

    In terns of things to look for, I think the most important thing is ensure she is certified when she graduates. Also getting into a classroom ASAP is key
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  • aunt beaaunt bea 10278 replies70 threads Senior Member
    Wherever she goes to school is where she will receive her practicum hours. That's where she should expect to be hired.
    California is a huge state and has many options for her education. She doesn't necessarily need to be in the northern part of the state to go to school.. Our CSU's are very strong for most education majors. For the price, it's a good deal. Teaching is a noble profession but that doesn't mean her paycheck will reflect that. Save your dollars and have her look throughout the state. She'll find that there are many options.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78020 replies3499 threads Senior Member
    @blossom I agree, but when I responded, the OP was mentioning colleges in CT but not UConn. So...that’s why I mentioned Southern.

    There are a lot of colleges...a lot...with active Hillel that also have education programs. Any flagship university will have that...I listed some above...but U of Delaware is another.
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  • fleishmo6fleishmo6 554 replies29 threads Member
    The college of New Jersey started out as a teachers college. Still IMO the best ranked for putting out teachers in the state of NJ . Nice campus and does well getting its grads employed.
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  • bopperbopper Forum Champion CWRU 14472 replies104 threads Forum Champion
    If she is thinking about Middle school/high school, then she could go to a state school anywhere and major in a content area, (e.g., Math, science, english, History, etc) and then get a Masters in Adolescent Teaching in the state where she wants to work. This way you can put off figuring it all out.
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  • zeebamomzeebamom 1412 replies3 threads Senior Member
    Western Washington University in Bellingham has a great Ed program. In Washington, she’d major in something else and also take Ed classes. A Masters isn’t required, but many teachers get one to get better pay.
    A sibling has taught all elementary grades (to 6th), and has settled on primary, gr 2. I wouldn’t get a degree in early childhood Ed, unless low pay, low/no benefits is ok.
    Observing or volunteering in a special ed classroom or blended class would be beneficial prior to deciding on specializing. It isn’t for everyone.

    Since hiring is often dependent on student teaching, going to school in the state where she plans to teach makes a lot of sense.
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  • wis75wis75 14376 replies65 threads Senior Member
    OP- you are likely overthinking this. There are hundreds of public and private U's/colleges that will give future teachers a good education. Most will have the Hillel and other services to suit her. Assume finances are not the deal breaker for her.

    Her priority in choosing schools will involve figuring out where she intends to work. Each state has specific requirements that would include local geography, history and political type knowledge. It makes sense to go to school where she intends to live for this reason. People can attest to the greatness of many schools, but frankly, the best ones will be where she intends to live after college as they will teach her (inside and outside the classroom) about local/area culture. She may need to figure out her chances of being admitted to a school of education as with high demand they could be competitive.

    I think you will notice a common thread in answers- it depends where she wants to be.
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  • jmnva06jmnva06 846 replies8 threads Member
    I'm going to disagree that deciding where to go to school=deciding where to work.

    Most states have reciprocity agreements that make getting jobs in a different state not that big of a deal.
    My impression is that most of my daughter's classmates are not staying in the same state as her school.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78020 replies3499 threads Senior Member
    @jmnva06

    Reciprocity agreements are not everywhere. They just aren’t.

    BUT the worst that can happen is that a graduate needs to take an addition Praxis test in most cases.

    I’ve had certification in four different states...with no real issues, but I do have the equivalent of national board certification in my field which made it really easy.

    In my state, a grad from another state needs to take the Praxis here...and they do check to see that all the required courses have been taken for certification.

    Teachers move from state to state all the time. That’s not an issue.

    But the connections you make during college, student teaching, etc. can help you with your entry level position, sometimes. After you have experience..that experience is what will matter.
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 30268 replies59 threads Senior Member
    Since you are not planning to stay in CA, have not made up mind where you want to move and your DD is not set on returrito work there after college, I suggest she find a school she likes, in an area she likes. A lot of kids stick around where they went to college, if the jobs, housing and atmosphere is conducive. Keep that in mind when looking at schools.

    Money not a huge issue here, so you look for some nice schools that have an education program that can get her on her feet after grad as a teacher. Someplace where work opportunities are there. Visit and see how it clicks. Frankly, most of my kids didn’t have a major, much less a career in mind when they were looking st schools but the feel of the school the atmosphere was all important. Visits are a good idea.
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