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Advice on education degrees - tried the education board, but may have more luck here

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Replies to: Advice on education degrees - tried the education board, but may have more luck here

  • mom60mom60 8300 replies513 threads Senior Member
    I live in Ca. I can share a couple of experiences I’ve seen in recent years. My niece graduated from San Diego State a few years ago. She went to work as a preschool teacher which she loved. Unfortunately it doesn’t pay a living wage. She is just starting a elementary credential program at another Cal State with the goal of being a K teacher.
    Another friend went to Seattle Pacific and got her education degree and teaching credential in 4 years. That credential is good in both Washington and Oregon. She knew going into her program that she would not be able to teach in Ca without going back to school to get the California credential. California is not a state known for having reciprocal credential programs. She should just go in knowing that if she gets her degree out of state and decides she wants to come back to Ca she will need to go back to school for the credential.
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    @mom60 What kind of schooling is required for the credential in CA? Even with a Masters in Teaching, which is what she is planning.

    My hope is that she likes wherever she goes, at least well enough to stick around for her entry level experience. She is planning to get involved in community service locally wherever she lands, so that's probably going to help. We haven't visited anywhere, but we plan to in the fall, especially to her top cold climate choices.
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  • LynnskiLynnski 245 replies12 threads Junior Member
    If she wants to be near her sibling at UConn but not at UConn, you might look at the school of education at UMass Amherst. It's close by, has a well-regarded ed school, and both the university and the town of Amherst have very nice Jewish communities. Both kids would fly in/out of Bradley airport.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 82789 replies738 threads Senior Member
    Re: #42

    See the page linked from reply #20 for California teaching credential information.
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  • TooOld4SchoolTooOld4School 3370 replies12 threads Senior Member
    Outside of a few urban and suburban districts, pay isn't that good for teachers. I know plenty who are leaving for other professions. Make sure that she is fully aware of what she is getting into.
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    @TooOld4School She is well aware. I have tried to dissuade her, and I told her that it's really not realistic to work in our area as a single woman, unless she lives with us, but we won't be staying here for that. Darn girl, wants to make a difference :) Her brother is on the autism spectrum, so she's got a compassionate heart. She hasn't expressed a passion for special ed per se, but is open to pursuing it, especially since she knows it's a bit more marketable.
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  • Novacat9191Novacat9191 45 replies0 threads Junior Member
    @overbearingmom . Best of luck, I just went through this with my D19 who will be majoring in Elem\Special Ed next year at Manahattan College. I do have a speadsheet that covers all the teaching programs in the NJ/NY/PA and some CT/MD areas if you are interested I would be happy to email it over.

    A few points to consider.

    1) How quickly are you getting in the classroom. Will you be observing classes Freshman year or wait until student teaching?

    2) Do they offer a 5 year masters program? It's almost a necessity now, and of course means starting at a higher salary3) What's their pass rate for the certification exams?

    4) What's the enrollment in the teaching program?

    5) How do placements for student teaching work?

    6) Since you are looking at different states, look what each one covers for grades. NY if 1-6, PA is PK-4. Some schools offer a step up or step down where you can take an additional class and get covered for the other grades.

    7) The usual, big vs small, city vs rural.

    As mentioned earlier a number of the Catholic colleges in the NE have really great programs (St Joe's, Manhattan, Seton Hall, Scranton) But out of the non-catholic schools I would suggest West Chester, TCNJ, Marist, Penn State, UMD. I would also suggest Braindeis if she is interested in a faith based environment.

    Let me know if you have any questions on any of the schools.





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  • blossomblossom 10339 replies9 threads Senior Member
    Brandeis is a secular university and is the OPPOSITE of a faith based environment. There are zero doctrinal requirements.
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    @Novacat9191 Thank you, I would love the spreadsheet! I have one started as well, but I don't believe in reinventing the wheel. Next week is the last week of school, and then we will be heading into full research mode. Questions 1-2 are on our radar. She is looking at Brandeis. Funny thing is, she's strongly considering Drexel because she was waiting for a Brandeis rep at a college fair, and I told her talk to the person next to her. The Drexel rep was enthusiastic and knowledgeable about the program, so it rocketed to #1.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78020 replies3499 threads Senior Member
    edited May 2019
    Will you be observing classes Freshman year or wait until student teaching?

    Oh heavens...if the first classroom experience is student teaching...RUN from this program. Our school send to have student teachers from one college...and their first classroom time was student teaching. I can’t tell you how heartbreaking it was to see a first or second semester college senior realize that teaching was NOT their cup of tea.

    Student teaching is too late for the first classroom experience.
    edited May 2019
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  • Novacat9191Novacat9191 45 replies0 threads Junior Member
    @thumper1: yes that was my point. There were a number of schools that don't actually admitt you into the teaching school until Junior year.
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  • NJWrestlingmomNJWrestlingmom 1669 replies2 threads Senior Member
    My son's school doesn't admit to the education department until junior year, but he was in the classroom before that.

    Back when I was in school (early 90's), student teaching was it - I can't even count how many friends I have with teaching degrees who never set foot in a classroom after that! I think most have moved away from that model for that exact reason. If not, what thumper said - RUN!
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    @NJWrestlingmom how did that work to be in the classroom before in the program? Did you mention above what program that was? Is it sort of a pre-education track for the first two years, with some education classes while the focus is on gen ed major? It was my daughter, to her credit, who realized what a plus the early exposure would be.
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  • Novacat9191Novacat9191 45 replies0 threads Junior Member
    There are some subtle differerces. Based on certain state requirements, you may not be "formally" admitted as a teacher candidate until junior year at some schools. This does not preclude you from doing obeservations or 200 level education classes.

    There are however some schools (Rutgers) that you actually start out in the school of liberal arts and then actually apply to the school of education junior year.

    One of the things that was most enlightening was actually looking at the course schedule for each year.
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  • threebeansthreebeans 790 replies37 threads Member
    DD also wants to go into education. We were very impressed with the staff at University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. They have a school on campus for the college students to work at so it eliminates the need to keep a vehicle there. DD ultimately decided on UNL. Even though we are from the midwest - Nebraska takes nice to a whole new level. Search Nebraska universities for Teachers Scholars Academy .
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    We are definitely looking at U of M. Was impressed with them at the college fair too. Plus, husband's large extended family is in the cities or at most a few hours away, so she'd have a place to go for Thanksgiving or to crash if she needed a break. I'll check out Nebraska. Something tells me I'm going to do all this research, and she's going to end up picking from the three or four that are already on her list.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78020 replies3499 threads Senior Member
    edited May 2019
    @overbearingmom

    My program required a student observation in a classroom at the start of sophomore year. It was a one crest course, and was actually done when public schools started in the fall. It was a two week everyday gig...gave students food for thought early on.

    Junior year, we had a one day a week thing in a school classroom. This was often doing work for the teacher, preparing materials, and doing some small group instruction...or things like read alouds. Again...more food for thought.

    Then we had the full semester of student teaching senior year. Most people did this fall term...and it started when school started and ended when the holiday break happened in December.

    Your daughter needs to know also, that in many states, the education majors pick a content area subject as their actual major, and the education courses are layered onto that. So she would need to choose a major...math, science, psychology, English, history, a foreign language...whatever.

    Which U of M are you looking at? There are a bunch...Michigan, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota....

    edited May 2019
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  • overbearingmomoverbearingmom 152 replies12 threads Junior Member
    Sorry, someone mentioned Univ of Minnesota - Twin Cities. As mentioned, that's in the mix more from a proximity to family members than the program, at this point. She hasn't started her deeper dive that she will this summer. She's working as a camp counselor this year, so that may inform whether she wants to work with younger vs. older
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  • NJWrestlingmomNJWrestlingmom 1669 replies2 threads Senior Member
    @overbearingmom my son is at Rowan, a state uni in NJ. He is still an elem ed major (they require a double major, so he is elem ed and history). There are a number of education classes he's taken,but in order to do the higher level classes he needs to pass the Praxis Core Exam and get grades of C- or better in all classes, with an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher. Not meeting any of those, and you can't be formally admitted to the major to take the junior year higher level ed classes.
    But this year he did have to undergo fingerprinting and background check to get into a class. He spent 1 day a week Spring semester in a local school, with a college class meeting afterwards.
    I believe he will do something similar with the next 2 semesters of higher level ed classes, before doing student teaching. It's a lot of work with a double major!
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  • jagrrenjagrren 73 replies2 threads Junior Member
    i would suggest going to college in a state that has an excellent public school system. I work in northern NJ, and our schools are supported and well funded. Teacher salaries are better than most. It really sucks the life out of you to work in an underfunded school.
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