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Gap Year before high school

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Replies to: Gap Year before high school

  • milgymfammilgymfam 651 replies11 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 662 Member
    edited June 6
    It is very simple and straightforward to homeschool in CA, we did it for two years. You file a notice of intent to homeschool online once a year (there is a specific window of time for it, October 1st-15th each year) and give your homeschool a name. That’s it. There are no reporting regulations or testing requirements at all. Best of luck to your family!
    edited June 6
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22092 replies14 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 22,106 Senior Member
    And read up on the sports regulations. You need to make sure he's not considered a high schools, especially if he's playing a sport even at the club level, to make sure he doesn't run out of eligibility.
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  • mathmommathmom 32012 replies158 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 32,170 Senior Member
    edited June 6
    I've known a handful of people who repeated grades by attending private schools. (And others who were able to skip grades by going that route.) But they had good reasons for those choices. We are talking about an academically advanced kid here. FWIW my tiny 8th grader grew 8" in less than two years.
    edited June 6
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  • CorralenoCorraleno 140 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 141 Junior Member
    @lovemidwest I think you have a good plan — and that's awesome that your son is already familiar with AOPS, that seems like the ideal way to cover math next year. As milgymfam mentioned above, homeschooling in CA is super simple, you just file a Private School Affidavit in October. Here's a link for that:
    https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/ps/affidavit.asp
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  • shuttlebusshuttlebus 456 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 457 Member
    @lovemidwest. I am also a homeschooler and think your plan for next year is great. There are many homeschoolers out there who have provided their kid with a rigorous education without using co-ops or other outside classes.

    Good luck! Just beware - your son may enjoy next year so much that he will want to continue homeschooling all 4 years of high school,too!
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  • wis75wis75 13892 replies62 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 13,954 Senior Member
    Why are you moving to a state you do not embrace? You are willing to do the job change but not embrace the neighborhood and city culture? You are choosing to exclude him from your neighbors and local culture if you only expose him to a homeschool study group. I would certainly think you can afford a neighborhood with good schools if you are bothering with the relocation.
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 1704 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,710 Senior Member
    edited June 7
    I worry more about the fact that OP seems to have jumped on the homeschooling bandwagon as some sort of solution to problems unforeseen originally (almost as a legal way to take a gap year) rather than really thinking through all of it. I have no doubt that homeschoolers can be well integrated into community etc, but most homeschool parents I am aware of that do these things successfully have spent a lot of time and research on homeschooling itself as well as what opportunities are available. (Unfortunately I do also know homeschooled kids who have not had a successful experience either educationally or socially. I don’t think it just falls into place without proper preparation, and I don’t think it’s the type of thing just any parent can do successfully.)
    edited June 7
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2701 replies36 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,737 Senior Member
    They don't need to make academic progress in his year off; he can engage intellectually as interests him and wait for his classmates to catch up. The kid has his sports club and teammates for socializing, and may find other outlets. It is only a year and sounds like the plan will be fine.
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  • tutumom2001tutumom2001 1199 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,201 Senior Member
    edited June 7
    I think a lot of people have lost sight of the OP's intentions. I don't have a problem with homeschooling, but I can't fathom that California laws are going to allow a kid to just play truant for a year while he grows in stature enough to be a contender for D1 recruiting in four years. And, that is what the OP is looking for. She doesn't want him involved in academic study because then he might lose his NCAA eligibility.
    edited June 7
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 1704 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,710 Senior Member
    edited June 7
    ^ But that’s a bit like saying it’s ok to drop out of college because zuckerberg and gates did ok. Just because someone managed to make “unschooling” work into an uncommon success, doesn’t make it the right choice for the majority of kids.

    I wonder what the child actually wants. I don’t know if that’s been mentioned anywhere?
    edited June 7
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2701 replies36 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,737 Senior Member
    There is no sign that it isn't the right choice for this kid. The parents have thought about it and have a plan. Hundreds of thousands of people homeschool successfully, often when their primary focus is athletics or dance.
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  • milgymfammilgymfam 651 replies11 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 662 Member
    There is no evidence that unschooling produces negative results regularly any more than evidence that it regularly produces ivy graduates.
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 1704 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,710 Senior Member
    The parents have thought about it and have a plan.

    I guess this is the point we agree to disagree over.
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