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Students unaware they were not taking real AP Exam

FlaParentFlaParent 82 replies18 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 100 Junior Member

Replies to: Students unaware they were not taking real AP Exam

  • skieuropeskieurope 37879 replies6553 discussionsSuper Moderator Posts: 44,432 Super Moderator
    edited June 26
    If true, the principal deserves whatever discipline she receives.

    The "good" news: the students would likely not have received credit enyway. Very very few colleges, especially amongst the private colleges, give credit for AP Seminar. And I can't imagine any scenario where 400+ 9th graders should be taking AP seminar; it's designed as a capstone course. And freshman capstone would be an oxymoron.
    edited June 26
    Post edited by skieurope on
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  • cmfl11cmfl11 70 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 77 Junior Member
    @skieurope Actually, it seems that most if not all Florida publics (including UF) do give credit for AP Seminar. Given that this happened in Florida, it's definitely a problem. I agree that freshmen shouldn't be taking Seminar, and certainly not ALL freshmen at a large public high school.
    I found the principal's excuse that they never said the class could earn college credit disingenuous at best; every high school student knows that AP classes can result in college credit, so of course they would have assumed that to be true here.
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  • iaparentiaparent 251 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 252 Junior Member
    It doesn't surprise me that all freshman students were enrolled in AP classes (not necessarily seminar though). I have a friend that teaches in a struggling school in a neighboring district and they have made the move to require all students to take APUSH and other AP courses as a major state evaluation criteria is the percentage of students taking AP courses. The school can increase their metrics by having 100% participation even though passing rates, AP test scores, etc. will be dismal. Just another way to game the system for the district to keep the funding flowing but a disservice to the kids.
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  • kiddiekiddie 3287 replies210 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,497 Senior Member
    The issue of who should pay for AP exams comes up in many school districts (even wealthier ones). Should the district pay or should the students pay?
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  • skieuropeskieurope 37879 replies6553 discussionsSuper Moderator Posts: 44,432 Super Moderator
    It doesn't surprise me that all freshman students were enrolled in AP classes (not necessarily seminar though).
    I have no issue with freshman taking AP classes for which they are qualified and which are part of the departments curriculum flow. At most schools that allow it, it means honors students for courses like AP Human Geography or AP World History. For a public school, unless it is one where enrollment is based on examination results, I see no validity to having an entire grade take an AP course, particularly 9th grade. As I have said numerous times on this site, in theory, AP exams are supposed to be equivalent to introductory college courses, and while a very small minority of kids are ready for that challenge in the 9th grade, they are the exception. And don't get me started on my opinions of courses like AP Seminar, APHG, etc being equivalent to college courses.
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  • Gator88NEGator88NE 6402 replies195 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,597 Senior Member
    @kiddie wrote:
    The issue of who should pay for AP exams comes up in many school districts (even wealthier ones). Should the district pay or should the students pay?
    In the state of Florida, the state pays for the AP exams, not the district. The state also gives each district additional funding for AP classes (as well as IB and AICE), and pays a bonus to AP teachers, based on their students scores on the AP exam.

    With the state investing a large amount of $ into AP programs, it also insures that the public universities will give credit for these classes (based on the test score).

    With that being said, I didn't even know there was an "AP Seminar". I don't think UF gives credit for it. The other schools may give 3 "generic" credits, but those credits would not count toward any college/state requirements, other than the "number of credits" to earn a BS. Fairly useless.
    https://archive.catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/1516/advising/info/AP-examination-credit-info.aspx
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76489 replies665 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 77,154 Senior Member
    https://catalog.ufl.edu/UGRD/academic-advising/exam-credit/#examstext says that a 3 or higher on the "Capstone Seminar" AP exam gives 3 credits listed as IDS L000 (effectively generic electives) at the University of Florida.
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  • RichInPittRichInPitt 574 replies8 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 582 Member
    edited June 28
    Yes, both Seminar and Capstone get 3 credits for L000 in Interdisciplinary Studies.

    "The L000 course number has no UF course equivalent. The credit applies to the minimum credits for the degree but does not provide credit toward general education, writing requirement, or count toward the major."

    My D received similar for AP's where she scored a 3. It's really worth nothing other than she can register for classed early because her credit total technically puts her in the next class. But it counts for nothing in terms of graduating.
    edited June 28
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  • RichInPittRichInPitt 574 replies8 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 582 Member
    "Assistant Principal Robert Voges told investigators that AP Seminar was “inferenced” as a course for potential college credit, “but never sold that way.”"

    Great - an Assistant Principal that is fine playing semantic games with his students (and apparently doesn't understand imply vs. infer).
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  • skieuropeskieurope 37879 replies6553 discussionsSuper Moderator Posts: 44,432 Super Moderator
    an Assistant Principal that is fine playing semantic games with his students (and apparently doesn't understand imply vs. infer)
    English is not my mother tongue, but IMO he understands the difference, although the sentence is a bit awkward; the students/parents inferred that it was a course for potential college credit, but he (allegedly) never implied that it was.
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  • UndercrackersUndercrackers 851 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 853 Member
    @kiddie At D's public HS, it was the student paying for AP exams through her junior year. Senior year, the district offered to pay for them, regardless of need. Great, right? However, the form they asked everyone to use was the free/reduced lunch form, which captures a lot of personal data like household income. As a family, we felt it was weird applying to have D's AP exams paid for as if we were low income, which we - and a lot of other families - were not. If it's available to ANYONE taking the exam, regardless of need, why do they want know how much we make? We declined to submit the form and were hounded both with mail and phone recordings for WEEKS to submit the form. It was just...weird. That just confirmed to us that there was some sort of incentive - economic or otherwise - for the school/district to gather our data and that they were not being forthcoming with that fact. We continued to nope out of it and paid the $90.00 in test fees. I have no idea if they continued the practice after she graduated.
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22092 replies14 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 22,106 Senior Member
    The part I didn't believe was that the district or the school paid for the AP exams. As Gator88 said, in Florida the state reimburses the schools for them. At my Ds' school, if you took an AP class, you HAD to take the exam and the penalty if you didn't take it was you have to pay the $90 or so to reimburse the school/state.

    It sounds like this principal/school wanted all the students to take the AP class but then didn't want the official scores to be part of their records.
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  • 3kids2dogs3kids2dogs 65 replies12 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 77 Junior Member
    I wish the school paid for the exams - that would be great. At @$100 an exam, they add up. We just got all the HS registration materials in the mail today and I learned that, this year, they want everyone to register for their exams by Thanksgiving. Seems early to me since the kids won't even have taken their first final exam in the course, but I'm sure we'll register for all five AP classes that my daughter is taking next year. Ugh.
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  • dadof4kidsdadof4kids 599 replies58 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 657 Member
    We are on the block schedule. D21 will have to sign up for three of her AP exams 2 months before she starts the class.
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