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Most Commonly Forgotten Items to Pack for a Dorm Move

CCEdit_TorreyCCEdit_Torrey 26 replies226 postsEditor Editor
We've rounded up a few items that families frequently forget to pack for the dorm move-in. What other items are often forgotten? https://www.collegeconfidential.com/articles/parents-dont-forget-these-items-as-you-pack-for-college/
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Replies to: Most Commonly Forgotten Items to Pack for a Dorm Move

  • SammoJSammoJ 14 replies0 postsRegistered User New Member
    The "kitchen junk drawer" stuff they take for granted - tape, scissors, screwdriver, stapler, post-it notes, stamps, envelopes. Thread and needle (and the ability to sew a button back on).
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22422 replies14 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    The recommendation for the medical power of attorney makes no sense. So you have a completed POA and it is filed with your primary care doc and there is a copy in the glove compartment in her car. How is that going to help you on the phone with the ER? YOU need the document and then you need to be able to get a copy to the ER (phone, text, fax). But that only helps if they determine that your daughter is incompacitated.
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  • brantlybrantly 3868 replies67 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    The recommendation for the medical power of attorney makes no sense. So you have a completed POA and it is filed with your primary care doc and there is a copy in the glove compartment in her car. How is that going to help you on the phone with the ER? YOU need the document and then you need to be able to get a copy to the ER (phone, text, fax). But that only helps if they determine that your daughter is incompacitated.

    You keep it on your phone, ready to email or upload to secure site. If student is unconscious or in surgery and parent calls to get info, medical personal won't talk to you without HIPAA release, which is usually incorporated into medical POA. Or student can just pre-sign a universal HIPAA release that parent keeps on phone.

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  • thumper1thumper1 73755 replies3215 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Isn’t there another thread someplace about things folks didn’t remember to take to their college?

    Really...my kid was in the Peace Corp is a not quite developed country...and even there...there were stores. I can’t think of any essential that you would leave behind that you couldn’t get if needed (even prescriptions can be filled).

    We had another thread on things kids take and never use...my guess is the things left behind and the things never used have some overlap!
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22422 replies14 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    The suggesting in the article was not to keep it on the parents' phones, but to put a copy in the car's glove compartment. That's what I thought was silly. My pediatrician told me not to bother giving a POA to the daycare/after school care or even listing the doctor's/dentist's numbers on a medical forms. She said she'd seen too many times when after an accident at the school the care providers look for the forms, waste time calling the doctor's office, calling parents, etc. She said to write on the forms Call 911 instead of putting the doctor's numbers on the form because she couldn't do anything anyway.

    If the example of the kid playing soccer and needing to go to the ER, the kid is either unconscious and the ER will treat her or she's conscious and she'll either be able to give permision to talk to the parents or agree to her own treatment.

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  • brantlybrantly 3868 replies67 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    The suggesting in the article was not to keep it on the parents' phones, but to put a copy in the car's glove compartment. That's what I thought was silly.
    Agree. Writer of the article got it wrong. You need it on your person, not in the car.
    If the example of the kid playing soccer and needing to go to the ER, the kid is either unconscious and the ER will treat her or she's conscious and she'll either be able to give permision to talk to the parents or agree to her own treatment.
    I think the medical POA is more useful for enabling parents to talk to the doctors/nurses. As in the example in the article, if your 18+ kid is in emergency surgery and you are 400 miles away and call the hospital for info, they'll tell you to get lost. If you have the medical POA or HIPAA release, you can fax it or email it over to them along with a photo of your driver's license.

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  • homerdoghomerdog 4841 replies88 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Hm. Our S19 signed a HIPAA release at his pediatrician's office. Is that one good enough if something happens to him at school? Or do we need a "universal HIPAA form"? And how do we find something like that? Does it have to be notorized?
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 6619 replies39 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 7
    You need something universal. Most states have free downloadable health care power of attorney forms. Usually they need to be witnessed but not necessarily notarized.
    edited August 7
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  • homerdoghomerdog 4841 replies88 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @momofsenior1 So one for home state and one for college state? No way to just have one? What if they travel for a sport and could be in multiple states? Seems complicated. Maybe I'll call his school and see if they have any advice.
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 6619 replies39 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Other states should recognize your home state’s DPOHC.
    I’m my mom’s agent and her form is from OH but now she lives in FL. I have no issue when she’s hospitalized.

    Remember too that you are next of kin for your child and in an emergency, health providers want to reach you!

    Schools will have forms for their own health clinics to talk to you (like an MD’s office HIPPA forms).
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  • CheeringsectionCheeringsection 2381 replies71 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 8
    My DS drives himself back and forth to school which is about 5 hours. DH, DS and I all have his paperwork on our phones. We do not assume he would be at school when it might be needed.
    edited August 8
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  • brantlybrantly 3868 replies67 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 8
    Other states should recognize your home state’s DPOHC.
    Remember too that you are next of kin for your child and in an emergency, health providers want to reach you!
    No. That's only on TV soap operas. Rules of consanguinity do not apply for release of medical information or for making medical decisions on one's behalf if the patient is not a minor. Consanguinity is legally applicable only in determining heirs and in certain prohibitions, such as certain marriages and jury participation.

    edited August 8
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  • homerdoghomerdog 4841 replies88 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Cheeringsection “his paperwork” ...what exactly is it? HIPPA by state? I don’t know why I’m struggling with this. I don’t get it. I see forms online but they all ask you to fill in WHO you asking to release the info (like a certain hospital or doctor). The only one we’ve filled out so far is at our pediatrician. And my understanding is that is just for her to give us S19’s info if we request it. It didn’t seem universal even to the state we live in.
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  • brantlybrantly 3868 replies67 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 8
    homerdog wrote: »
    @Cheeringsection “his paperwork” ...what exactly is it? HIPPA by state? I don’t know why I’m struggling with this. I don’t get it. I see forms online but they all ask you to fill in WHO you asking to release the info (like a certain hospital or doctor). The only one we’ve filled out so far is at our pediatrician. And my understanding is that is just for her to give us S19’s info if we request it. It didn’t seem universal even to the state we live in.

    She's referring to the HIPAA release and/or medical power of attorney. It is most important for the agent -- that's YOU -- to have the "paperwork" on your phone. You are the one who will be calling the ER and saying, that's my son you've got there, I'm his designated agent, and I can email you the signed paperwork to prove it.

    What your son filled out at his pediatrician's office is just for that office.
    edited August 8
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  • brantlybrantly 3868 replies67 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Now, note that some medical facilities will talk to parents (or adult children of elderly patients) without the signed release or POA. They have the option to do that if they feel, in their judgment, that they should and that they patient won't file a complaint about it when he comes to. But they do not HAVE TO talk to you and often will not. Better to have the signed documents so you don't have to rely on the whims of the person you speak to on the phone.
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  • Trixy34Trixy34 1171 replies6 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @homerdog - the execution requirements for health care powers of attorney are pretty similar for most states, so if you had one done up in your state, it would probably be OK in Maine. That said, though, you might want to search for a Maine HIPAA release form. Sometimes state or county bar associations have guidebooks or sample living wills you can find online.
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22422 replies14 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    My friend's brother was taken to the hospital recently, in a coma. He never regained consciousness but lived for 2 weeks. The hospital had no problem talking to her and her sister (both parents dead for a long time), the doctors met with them and let them make all decisions, including when to stop medical care. The women hadn't seen their brother in 5+years (my friend just happened to run into him 2 days before this and had learned where he lived). They didn't have anything listing them as POA, next of kin, living at the same address. Nothing.

    They were wary of claiming any legal guardianship of him because they needed him to qualify for medicaid. Hospital didn't make them sign anything and I think were glad just to find someone who cared.
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  • thumper1thumper1 73755 replies3215 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Somehow I thought this thread was about items for the dorm room or supplies...not medical things. I guess that’s something that could be left behind...but is that what the thread intent was?
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