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The Most Regretted Majors All Had One Thing In Common

ScipioScipio 8480 replies478 threads Senior Member
edited December 2019 in Parents Forum
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/12/05/the-top-10-college-majors-american-students-regret-the-most.html

According to this study a whopping 42% of college graduates who majored in English regretted choosing that major. And the most commonly cited reason not only for English majors but for all the most regretted undergraduate majors was limited job opportunities. Rounding out the top 5 most regretted majors:
1. English/Foreign Language (42% regret)
2. Sciences (35%)
3. Education (31%)
4. Social Science/Law (29%)
5. Communications (27%)

On the flip side the least regretted majors were:
1. Computer Science/Math (13% regret)
2. (Tie) Business and Engineering (both 16%)
4. Health Administration (18%)
5. (Tie) Community/Family/Personal Services, Health Science Technologies, and Repair/Production/Construction (19% each)
edited December 2019
497 replies
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Replies to: The Most Regretted Majors All Had One Thing In Common

  • AboutTheSameAboutTheSame 3145 replies47 threads Senior Member
    And your point is?
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 3285 replies39 threads Senior Member
    The report was produced by Georgetown University's center for education and workforce, and you can Google it if you wish to learn the methodology. They, and I, found the results quite interesting.
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 3285 replies39 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    😁😁😁. Actually, it looks like some of the salary data regarding college came from Georgetown, but the majors report was prepared by a labor economist at Ziprecruiter based on a survey of 5000 recent college grads. It does note that of course there are many things besides salary which can be considered. But it is nice to have a salary.
    edited December 2019
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  • HowardGradlyHowardGradly 160 replies6 threads Junior Member
    Thanks @Scipio I found your post interesting.
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  • Happytimes2001Happytimes2001 1688 replies13 threads Senior Member
    @compmom Totally agree. People used to go to college for the life of the mind. They wanted to learn how to think so they could eventually do many jobs.
    Today, many programs are based on job specific learning. Very different.

    While I would presume this study is based on recent graduates, it would be great to look at a cross section of ages. Someone 50 years old with a degree in English may have found that field to be really valuable ( in PR, journalism, communications, etc) while someone 22 who doesn't have any other skills and is looking at their first job, might not.
    Not every person is wired for every major. The regrets in the sciences field, I'd guess would be kids who went into the field for the positive job prospects and high income and found it wasn't what they wanted to do.

    My advice to my kids is always along the lines of find some things ( not just one) that you like to do. Create a plan where you have several options for various jobs and develop multiple skills. I know this isn't popular. But people who love their jobs and who are highly paid are also often highly specialized. When you combine multiple fields you can often create your own job. And these jobs tend to pay better. Plus one never knows which fields will become obsolete. Or which fields will develop.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79717 replies712 threads Senior Member
    @compmom Totally agree. People used to go to college for the life of the mind. They wanted to learn how to think so they could eventually do many jobs.
    Today, many programs are based on job specific learning. Very different.

    While I would presume this study is based on recent graduates, it would be great to look at a cross section of ages. Someone 50 years old with a degree in English may have found that field to be really valuable ( in PR, journalism, communications, etc) while someone 22 who doesn't have any other skills and is looking at their first job, might not.

    The entry-level job market may be more competitive with higher standards now than a generation ago.

    * There are more college graduates now, so there is greater competition for jobs that will hire someone with a BA/BS in anything.
    * There may be more competition from those dismissed from their more senior jobs in the recent recession who are desperately looking for anything, including entry and lower mid level jobs.
    * Many jobs that were willing to hire "smart people" (often with having a BA/BS as a proxy for that) and have them learn on the job now expect entry level employees to be ready to do the job immediately.
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  • Happytimes2001Happytimes2001 1688 replies13 threads Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus I'm thinking longer term. Yes, it's harder to get good entry level jobs that will lead to bigger things. But over decades, a persons education becomes less relevant than their skills ( except when they change jobs or in certain fields). And English is a strong skill set.

    recent recession#$#% Where do you live?? OMG, they are paying $15 to work at any local supermarket. And there are signs for help wanted everywhere . The economy is better than it has been in years. Up and down the food chain.
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