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Wither the regional public university?

scholarminscholarmin 27 replies12 threads Junior Member
I often see threads about small private colleges failing or facing serious financial challenges, with the suggestion that students may be opting for cheaper regional public universities. But in Minnesota (and other states; see the recent thread on PASSHE schools), the regional public universities are facing similar enrollment crises, even laying off tenured faculty. https://www.sctimes.com/story/news/2019/10/22/minnesota-state-schools-enrollment-change-college-scsu/4055762002/
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Replies to: Wither the regional public university?

  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79714 replies712 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Wouldn't that have a lot to do with declining populations of college intending and ready high school graduates in the areas that the regional public universities are located in?

    If not (or even if so), another possibility is that the regional public universities' costs have increased to the point that they are no longer financially accessible to some of the students who would attend.
    edited December 2019
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  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston 15078 replies1021 threads Senior Member
    Such public universities have few out of state students and minimal international students.
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  • NJWrestlingmomNJWrestlingmom 1371 replies2 threads Senior Member
    2 of our regional publics (NJ) - TCNJ and Rowan - are growing by leaps and bounds. I believe Stockton is even increasing enrollment. Rowan in particular has done a great job adding new facilities while offering decent merit to keep the cost in check.
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  • StPaulDadStPaulDad 480 replies1 threads Member
    Larger states with rural areas that are not close to major cities need more locations, and they are running into budget and enrollment challenges all over the country. For example PA was in the news recently with some serious questions for some of their under-performing out-state campuses.

    It's expensive to keep even a small campus staffed, so the emerging questions are "How much access to post-secondary education is enough?" (Is a two hour drive close enough?) And a close second is "How important is the boost a campus provides to the local economy?"
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  • NhatrangNhatrang 483 replies1 threads Member
    2 of our regional publics (NJ) - TCNJ and Rowan - are growing by leaps and bounds. I believe Stockton is even increasing enrollment. Rowan in particular has done a great job adding new facilities while offering decent merit to keep the cost in check.

    Add to the list is Rutgers - they plan to double the size of Engineering school in 5 years due to huge demand. My company is one of the organizations that will help make this happen.
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  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk 2583 replies5 threads Senior Member
    I wouldn't consider Rutgers is a regional school.
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  • SchadretSchadret 143 replies19 threads Junior Member
    2 of our regional publics (NJ) - TCNJ and Rowan - are growing by leaps and bounds. I believe Stockton is even increasing enrollment. Rowan in particular has done a great job adding new facilities while offering decent merit to keep the cost in check.

    Stockton's been increasing. Daughter started there last year and they had to make more doubles into triples. This year in the apartment housing they changed from 4 people to 5 people. Also built the new science center, and the entire Atlantic City campus for last year. Steady increase over the past few years.
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  • NhatrangNhatrang 483 replies1 threads Member
    I wouldn't consider Rutgers is a regional school.

    What is the "regional school"? I just want to know.

    Not sure if this is relevant - I read somewhere that Rutgers has 80% of its students from NJ and the rest is OOS and international.
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  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 13213 replies247 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Nhatrang wrote: »
    I wouldn't consider Rutgers is a regional school.

    What is the "regional school"? I just want to know.

    Not sure if this is relevant - I read somewhere that Rutgers has 80% of its students from NJ and the rest is OOS and international.

    I think here the term ("regional public universities") is used for state schools that are not the flagship. Rutgers is NJ's flagship.

    The article linked in OP doesn't seem to include any numbers for UMinn, even its regional campuses.
    edited December 2019
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  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston 15078 replies1021 threads Senior Member
    Another tern for regional college is second tier state school.
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  • SchadretSchadret 143 replies19 threads Junior Member
    The USNews Rankings define it as:

    Regional Universities: Like the National Universities, Regional Universities – defined by the Carnegie classification as Master's Colleges and Universities (larger programs), Master's Colleges and Universities (medium programs) and Master's Colleges and Universities (smaller programs) – provide a full range of undergraduate programs and some master's-level programs. They offer few, if any, doctoral programs.



    Regional Colleges: These institutions focus primarily on undergraduate education, just as the National Liberal Arts Colleges do, but grant less than 50% of their degrees in liberal arts disciplines. Some of these schools have small bachelor's degree programs.

    The Carnegie classification defines these schools as Baccalaureate Colleges—Diverse Fields; Baccalaureate/Associate's Colleges: Mixed Baccalaureate/Associate's Colleges; and Baccalaureate/Associate's Colleges: Associate's Dominant.

    There are a total of 373 Regional Colleges (169 public, 191 private and 13 for-profit) ranked within four regions: North, South, Midwest and West.
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  • 57special57special 638 replies15 threads Member
    I wonder if this is more of an indication of the lower numbers of school age kids in Minnesota. It's interesting to see that a lot of the technical colleges are experiencing drop offs...the ones who will be training Tradespeople, and support people for all sorts of industries.

    Minnesota has a great job market, with a pretty wide palette of jobs to choose from. Not a bad place to move to and raise a family, if you can handle a climate about the same as Montreal's. It's got good public education, reasonably safe cities, and a clean environment.

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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79714 replies712 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Nhatrang wrote: »
    I wouldn't consider Rutgers is a regional school.

    What is the "regional school"? I just want to know.

    Usually refers to schools which attract mainly students from the region of the state (as opposed to the whole state as is more common with flagships), typically those within commuting range except that in sparsely populated areas, any location in the region may leave many students in the region out of commuting range.

    In some states, they may be called "directional" schools, based on names like Northern Arizona, Eastern Michigan, South Alabama, Western Washington, etc..

    Granted, NJ / Rutgers seems to be a special case in that many NJ students seem to have a lot of disdain for Rutgers.
    edited December 2019
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  • NhatrangNhatrang 483 replies1 threads Member
    ucbalumnus wrote: »

    Granted, NJ / Rutgers seems to be a special case in that many NJ students seem to have a lot of disdain for Rutgers.

    Interesting, care to share where you get this impression? I do know a lot of kids who chose not to go to Rutgers but the only reason I heard was it's too close to home. We live 30 mins from there. I also know a lot of kids who do. I never heard a kid saying they hate Rutgers, though.
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  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston 15078 replies1021 threads Senior Member
    18 year old college bound students are New Jersey's leading export.
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  • NhatrangNhatrang 483 replies1 threads Member
    ^^ Because we have a lot of people and not enough colleges, like PA for example.

    After all, Rutgers has 80% of its students from NJ.
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  • RichInPittRichInPitt 1619 replies25 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Fwiw, I grew up in NJ, about 20 miles away, and Rutgers was never on my longest long list nor was it for anyone I knew in HS. Nor for my the kids of my sister and step-sister who stayed in state.

    I’m sure there were kids who went there, but there was nowhere the interest that Pitt/Penn State has here, tOSU had when I was in Ohio, or the big “Purdue or IU” decision Indiana kids seem to have to make.

    To the original topic - for those who don’t go to Pitt/PSU, the regional publics here - Slippery Rock, Clarion, Cal, etc., get a decent bit of interest, though local privates seem to be growing in popularity.
    edited December 2019
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  • SchadretSchadret 143 replies19 threads Junior Member
    NJ born and raised here.. My kids had no interest in Rutgers. Rutgers, to them, was a bunch of scattered buildings and campuses that you had to take a bus from class-to-class. We regularly had to go to RWJ hospital in New Brunswick and would pass by the bus stops outside a dorm in the freezing rain with kids huddled waiting to get taken to class. You pass by a lot of areas that are "Rutgers", but you generally don't ever get the impression that there's a 'campus'.. it wasn't until we did the tour that I ever went to one of the campuses and thought "oh, this feels more like a normal college.. didn't know they had areas like this".

    There also the fairly common perception that Rutgers doesn't help you at all.. woe is you if you need scheduling changes or any other type of administrative help. No idea if that's true, but that's what all my alumni friend say, and it's the perception my kids and their friends all had. I mean just look at their app - you have to hand-input all 4 years of your HS transcript! It also says something to me that I know a LOT of alumni, but none of their kids went there (or if they didn it wasn't their 1st choice).

    Add to that the bad sports teams and it just gets a bad rap in NJ, at least in my neck of the woods.

    Of course it's also expensive and gives almost no money.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79714 replies712 threads Senior Member
    Schadret wrote: »
    There also the fairly common perception that Rutgers doesn't help you at all.. woe is you if you need scheduling changes or any other type of administrative help. No idea if that's true, but that's what all my alumni friend say, and it's the perception my kids and their friends all had. I mean just look at their app - you have to hand-input all 4 years of your HS transcript!

    Rutgers is not unique in using self reported academic record for applications.
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  • Frank the TankFrank the Tank 39 replies0 threads Junior Member
    Schadret wrote: »
    NJ born and raised here.. My kids had no interest in Rutgers. Rutgers, to them, was a bunch of scattered buildings and campuses that you had to take a bus from class-to-class. We regularly had to go to RWJ hospital in New Brunswick and would pass by the bus stops outside a dorm in the freezing rain with kids huddled waiting to get taken to class. You pass by a lot of areas that are "Rutgers", but you generally don't ever get the impression that there's a 'campus'.. it wasn't until we did the tour that I ever went to one of the campuses and thought "oh, this feels more like a normal college.. didn't know they had areas like this".

    There also the fairly common perception that Rutgers doesn't help you at all.. woe is you if you need scheduling changes or any other type of administrative help. No idea if that's true, but that's what all my alumni friend say, and it's the perception my kids and their friends all had. I mean just look at their app - you have to hand-input all 4 years of your HS transcript! It also says something to me that I know a LOT of alumni, but none of their kids went there (or if they didn it wasn't their 1st choice).

    Add to that the bad sports teams and it just gets a bad rap in NJ, at least in my neck of the woods.

    Of course it's also expensive and gives almost no money.

    That all may be true (as my undergrad alma mater of UIUC faces a lot of the same critiques in the State of Illinois), yet I believe that the overall point is that Rutgers, Illinois, Penn State, Minnesota or any other flagship is *not* what the OP article means by a "regional public university." The University of Minnesota flagship campus is not a regional public university (even though the vast majority of students come from the State of Minnesota), while the schools listed in the OP article are all regional.
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