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Is this the end of ED?

OHMomof2OHMomof2 13213 replies247 threads Senior Member
Seems like a pretty big deal to me.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/21/us/politics/colleges-early-admission.html
the National Association for College Admission Counseling said it would allow its member college and university counselors to recruit students even after they have committed to another school and would permit members to encourage students to transfer after they have already enrolled.

So colleges can entice students to apply ED with perks like special housing or registration, but students who take the deal can change their minds, it appears? Other colleges can go after them with their own perks?
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Replies to: Is this the end of ED?

  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 2964 replies49 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    We shall see what happens. Those accepted thru ED will still be technically bound by their contract, even in to the summer. Of course if they break their contract their is little, if any, consequence.

    There was an uptick in the number of schools offering ED perks (early course registration, best housing choices, etc.) this cycle....and more schools will probably offer ED perks next cycle.

    Some schools have already increased their non-refundable deposit for those accepted this year (whether ED, EA, RD). Marist is at $750 now for example....so expect more schools to increase their deposits to make it more painful to switch schools after May 1.

    It will be interesting to see what happens after May 1 this year.....whether schools contact students they lost out on and offer them a greater discount (lower price)....that is likely to be the biggest perk of all. And for this year, average discount was just over 50% for the first time. It's unsustainable, and a race to the bottom.

    Counselors have also seen freshmen students contacted this semester by other colleges that accepted them last year.....trying to entice them to transfer.
    edited December 2019
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 27014 replies175 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    the short answer, no, not the end of ED. Just complying with federal anti-trust law.

    The fact is that most colleges do not have the resources to 'outbid' any ED perqs. Sure, some colleges down the food chain will want to increase their stats by poaching from above, but those numbers will have to be small. College ranked say, #100, can't afford to offer full tuition to hundreds of poachees.
    edited December 2019
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79717 replies712 threads Senior Member
    Or the matriculation deposits will get much bigger.

    But then if a college really wants to poach, it may offer to pay off the lost deposit.
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 2168 replies7 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    I wonder how many students really will be actively poached with offers of better housing , repaid lost deposits etc. I can’t imagine it’s going to be significant.
    edited December 2019
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  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston 15080 replies1021 threads Senior Member
    Reminds me of the days when AT&T, MCI, Sprint etc. would try and entice you to switch your long distance carrier and offer to pay any termination fee.
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  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff 5044 replies22 threads Senior Member
    So do you think this will make it harder for schools to predict their class sizes?

    Do you think some colleges would just switch to EA instead?
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 2168 replies7 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Some other pertinent extracts from NYT article linked above:

    Higher education experts anticipate that the changes will be mostly felt by smaller or less- selective institutions, many of which are already forecasting enrollment losses because of a looming “demographic cliff” from falling birthrates and diminishing interest from foreign students...

    ... Affluent students will still disproportionately apply for early decision, Mr. Rosenberg [ president of Macalester College] said, and with the increased competition, colleges will rush to recruit tuition-paying students to secure their revenue early. “It results in more benefit to the people who already benefit,“
    edited December 2019
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  • maya54maya54 2317 replies95 threads Senior Member
    “We shall see what happens. Those accepted thru ED will still be technically bound by their contract, even in to the summer. Of course if they break their contract their is little, if any, consequence.”

    Yep. The big “ consequence “ used to be that you could be blackballed by other schools app. But if the poaching school doesn’t care....absolutely no consequence.

    Don’t think that it’s the end of ED though. Allowing the perks will probably entice enough people to do it and stick with it.
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  • SarripSarrip 304 replies17 threads Member


    Some schools have already increased their non-refundable deposit for those accepted this year (whether ED, EA, RD). Marist is at $750 now for example....so expect more schools to increase their deposits to make it more painful to switch schools after May 1.

    @Mwfan1921 - My DD was admitted to a college EA and they are requesting a $1000 deposit.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 2964 replies49 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Sarrip wrote: »



    @Mwfan1921 - My DD was admitted to a college EA and they are requesting a $1000 deposit.

    Interesting! I saw the Marist VP of Admissions speak in early Nov and he said $750.....I guess they felt more pressure to increase it even higher. Congrats on your D's admit!
    edited December 2019
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  • SarripSarrip 304 replies17 threads Member
    Mwfan1921 wrote: »
    Sarrip wrote: »



    @Mwfan1921 - My DD was admitted to a college EA and they are requesting a $1000 deposit.

    Interesting! I saw the Marist VP of Admissions speak in early Nov and he said $750.....I guess they felt more pressure to increase it even higher. Congrats on your D's admit!


    I'm sorry for any confusion. I am referring to another college, not Marist. I was just commenting about the deposit amount.
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 2168 replies7 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    My D was admitted ED last year. They required both tuition and housing deposit, of $1500 total (I think it was $1k tuition and $500 housing).

    I do think one consequence of this (thinking of another thread) is that many ED applicants with offers just won’t pull their other applications, potentially prejudicing other applicants in the RD process, even though they’ve already had an advantage in ED ...giving them a kind of having their cake and eating it situation? Even more prejudicial to RD applicants than the current system?
    edited December 2019
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  • AlwaysMovingAlwaysMoving 295 replies2 threads Junior Member
    I think this won't cause poaching with enticements, but it will cause a lot of kids to accept a spot at a better school. The LACs at the bottom will be the ones that suffer. Schools will then feel it's necessary to lock in their commitments with perks and large deposits.

    How big does the deposit need to be to keep full pays from jumping? I know I wouldn't love wasting $5k to hold a spot at their safety, but it's not that large of an amount compared to 4 years of college.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79717 replies712 threads Senior Member
    Perhaps colleges may end up shifting to something more like hiring for jobs -- analogous to rolling admission + ED (i.e. admission and FA/scholarships may come at any time or schedule, but the admit has only a week or two to decide whether to matriculate).
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  • SJ2727SJ2727 2168 replies7 threads Senior Member
    The more I think about it the better it is for ED applicants than the previous system. Suddenly the things they had to give up for their ED place (ability to see who else they may get offers from, ability to compare $$, ability to change their mind, etc) are no longer an issue, just the deposit. And now they may get better perks for ED (like preferential housing and registration) that they were not allowed to be incentivized with previously. Unless the deposits get crazy high, I’m not seeing why anyone with the ability wouldn’t ED somewhere under this new system. The question is more how colleges are going to deal with greater uncertainty in their ED pool.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 2964 replies49 threads Senior Member
    ucbalumnus wrote: »
    Perhaps colleges may end up shifting to something more like hiring for jobs -- analogous to rolling admission + ED (i.e. admission and FA/scholarships may come at any time or schedule, but the admit has only a week or two to decide whether to matriculate).

    Agree that could happen.....and ultimately May 1 won't have much significance.

    I also see schools that don't meet full need being more aggressive in meeting the full need of the admitted students they really want.....at the expense of the rest of the admitted group whose average financial aid package will decrease.
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  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff 5044 replies22 threads Senior Member
    So maybe I don't understand but what do families of low-income or mid income do that can come up with a $200 deposit but not a $500 do?
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  • kelsmomkelsmom 15722 replies99 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    It’s a dog eat dog world out there, people. The reason for this change is because an increasing number of schools found themselves in very dire straits in terms of enrollment last May. Some did exactly what is now allowed, although it was technically not okay. I think enough schools are so worried about filling their class that the majority said they are okay with the rule change ... so they can do it, too.

    The pool of available students is shrinking. The cost to run a school is increasing. Schools will do whatever they can to get students, even “taking them” from other schools. Survival of the fittest ... or maybe of the craftiest.
    edited December 2019
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  • kelsmomkelsmom 15722 replies99 threads Senior Member
    P.S. I think enrollment deposits will increase, because students will be less likely to walk away from a big deposit. Yes, this will hurt low income students.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 79717 replies712 threads Senior Member
    SJ2727 wrote: »
    Unless the deposits get crazy high, I’m not seeing why anyone with the ability wouldn’t ED somewhere under this new system.

    The typical reasons not to apply ED are:

    1. Their most desired colleges do not offer ED, and they are unwilling to use ED tactically at lower choice colleges.
    2. They need to compare financial aid and scholarship offers between colleges.
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