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I didn’t cheat! (Lol)

maya54maya54 2384 replies97 threads Senior Member
edited January 25 in Parent Cafe
My mom just found my forty year old ACT report with a ( literal) carbon copy of the letter my counselor wrote documenting that I had “established difficulties in numeric based learning” that accounted for the dichotomy in my scores rather than cheating on some sections (16 ...she thinks..it’s faded(math) 18 ( science) 32 ( reading) 30-something...second number has faded away) (English). Lol. My mom said it was at the bottom of a drawer of old photos she just was organizing! I don’t even remember that he had to write it! I wonder if this happens today?
edited January 25
12 replies
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Replies to: I didn’t cheat! (Lol)

  • bopperbopper 14297 replies101 threadsForum Champion CWRU Forum Champion
    So what did you major in, and what are you working in now?
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  • CheddarcheeseMNCheddarcheeseMN 3553 replies12 threads Senior Member
    ^ Wondering that, too! Looks like some test prep might have helped, but we didn't do that then.
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  • maya54maya54 2384 replies97 threads Senior Member
    edited February 7
    I majored in History in college. I took the “rocks for jocks” type science ( I had a went on to be famous pro basketball player in one of my classes) classes and did well in those. I took one “ math” class to fulfill the requirement which was an accounting class. I passed but barely. It was my only grade below an A in college. I then went to law school. I am an attorney whose focus is on research and writing and appellate work. Math doesn’t come up. Numbers were occasionally an issue ( I reverse them often) when inputting citations but the newer electronic research fills them in for you.
    edited February 7
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  • raincatraincat 134 replies9 threads Junior Member
    @maya54 I too am a lawyer and my SAT math was terrible Tthis was in 1979, the dark ages. . I'm from a very small New England town, test prep was unheard of, and I'm not sure my parents even knew I was taking the SATs, I drove with my friends to the next town over to take them haha.

    I was on law review and published, graduated with honors etc etc. So yeah you can survive without being a math wiz!! The logic portion on the LSATs was no problem either, go figure. Ita just those pesky numbers, which I sometimes invert..

    My kids don't understand why I am amazed they do well in math but it fascinates me. Especially my youngest who gets As in honors math but always finishes her homework at school and never talks (complains) about math. It was a major stressor in my academic life! How can it be so easy for them???
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  • maya54maya54 2384 replies97 threads Senior Member
    edited February 7
    “My kids don't understand why I am amazed they do well in math but it fascinates me. Especially my youngest who gets As in honors math but always finishes her homework at school and never talks (complains) about math. It was a major stressor in my academic life! How can it be so easy for them???”

    Omg. EXACTLY. One of my daughters was a double engineering major at an elite school. She outgrew my math abilities in ( no joke) 4th grade.

    My husband is an engineer whose worst subject was English. We count our blessings that they didn’t get my math skills and his verbal ones. By some stroke of luck They seem to have inherited the best of both of us. What a lottery giving birth is!
    edited February 7
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 80156 replies720 threads Senior Member
    For those who could do logic but had difficulty with math, was high school geometry (with relatively more emphasis on logic) less difficult than other high school math?
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  • maya54maya54 2384 replies97 threads Senior Member
    “For those who could do logic but had difficulty with math, was high school geometry (with relatively more emphasis on logic) less difficult than other high school math”

    That would be a no for me ( And I got a perfect score on the logic questions on the LSAT)
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  • yucca10yucca10 1344 replies40 threads Senior Member
    Sounds like dyscalculia. It's been recognized as a learning disability relatively recently and still doesn't have as much attention as dyslexia does, presumably because it's much easier to succeed in life without math skills than without reading.
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  • raincatraincat 134 replies9 threads Junior Member
    @ucbalumnus yes! Geometry made sense, I did very well at it, and also some algebra which I believe is logical?
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  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff 5433 replies24 threads Senior Member
    My daughter has dyscalculia... She sooo wanted to do math in high school but just couldn't. They moved to fast. She was the star of her "lower" math class which was too easy...

    I got through geometry once I discovered it was all angles, sort of and I was a really good billiards player. Then it just clicked for some reason.

    I took the Sat or Act in 1979 also.... But honestly don't even remember taking it, going to it or the score. I am sure it was pretty bad.

    Same things with son in high school math. Did it during his class, never at home, everything was easy for him. He is also very good at explaining it to us mortals that are poor at math concepts.
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  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn 39957 replies2197 threads Super Moderator
    It's funny, I love all math except geometry - my mind just couldn't wrap itself around proofs! And now I'm a structural engineer, ha.
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  • HImomHImom 35122 replies396 threads Senior Member
    I loved proofs and math—until calculus. I never could understand it in HS nor college.

    We thought we were pretty decent at math but S passed us—in 7th grade. My math score was 100 points higher than my verbal. S had a perfect verbal and was irked his math wasn’t perfect too.

    D is a far better editor than S ever was. Her understanding and explanation of math leaves us scratching our heads but she can figure things out in her own way and time.
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  • ChoatieMomChoatieMom 5485 replies261 threads Senior Member
    I loved proofs, too, and got A's in all my math classes, even past calculus, but I majored in English. DH is solid in math as well, but our son is waaay out there. He validated calculus and started college in a course nicknamed "Jedi" math, earned an A+, and ended up in independent math studies by graduation. He's also a very good writer. However, I am dismayed by how hard it is for DH and I to keep up with his speed of thought and speech. I guess our neurons are just slowing down with age at the time his are peaking, but sometimes I’m left feeling rather slow and battered after lengthy conversations with him. (end of not so humble brag)

    To the OP's comment, though, when I graduated from college, my mother finally told me the real reason I repeated first grade. I had always been told that it was because of the timing of our move to a new school district, but the truth was that I didn't adjust to kindergarten (“underperformed”), and my first grade teacher suggested testing because she thought I might be mildly ****. The testing did indicate that I had some type of impairment, and one of the recommendations was that I repeat first grade at the new school, so I did, but my parents never accepted the test results and burned the evaluation. In any case, I was extremely shy but eventually got over it enough to go to school without crying every morning (around 4th grade) and eventually flourished. I'm glad I did not know about the diagnosis, and I’m glad my parents were confident enough to take a wait-and-see attitude. Tests don’t measure everything.
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