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Schools known for good merit aid

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Replies to: Schools known for good merit aid

  • lastone03lastone03 Registered User Posts: 796 Member
  • FlyAwayTimeFlyAwayTime Registered User Posts: 19 Junior Member
    I was wondering whether most schools give merit GPA contingent or not. If you have a student who struggles with transitions, this can be a problem and would risk merit aid.
  • Bubblewrap666Bubblewrap666 Registered User Posts: 151 Junior Member
    @FlyAwayTime Yes, most merit scholarships are tied to maintaining a certain GPA. However, the GPA requirement can vary dramatically by school, and there may or may not be supports in place that allow students either "grace periods" or the opportunity to re-earn scholarships. I would check with schools individually; most of that info can be found on the school website.
  • FlyAwayTimeFlyAwayTime Registered User Posts: 19 Junior Member
    Thanks, @Bubblewrap666 I took a quick look at Vanderbilt just to determine and I didn't find any indication of merit and GPA. Is this something most schools advertise then? I also found this

    "Roughly 1% of the entire freshman applicant pool will be offered a merit-based scholarship award. The number of merit scholarships is limited, as the majority of Vanderbilt’s student financial assistance is provided in the form of need-based financial aid."

    So only 1% of applicants are offered merit. Is that typical?
  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 Registered User Posts: 630 Member
    edited October 23
    @flyawaytime @Bubblewrap666 You can look at a school's common data set to see financial aid details, both need and non-need based. Here is Vanderbilt's 2017/18 CDS https://virg.vanderbilt.edu/virgweb/CDSH.aspx?year=2017

    Section H has the fin aid numbers. H2A shows that 134 freshman received non-need based scholarships and grants (not including athletic scholarships). In H2(g) there were another 77 students non-need based scholarships and grants, in addition to need-based aid. In summary, a total of 211 freshman received non-need based scholarships/grants which is about 13% of all freshman (211/1607). You can also look at the total dollars of fin aid awarded to calculate averages.
  • Bubblewrap666Bubblewrap666 Registered User Posts: 151 Junior Member
    @FlyAwayTime For schools at Vanderbilt's level, yes. They tend to give very few merit scholarships, but they are big $$$. Drop down down a tier or two in selectivity, and you will see schools give smaller -- but still significant -- merit scholarships to a broader range of students. For example, look how Miami of OH does it https://miamioh.edu/admission/merit-guarantee/.
  • VineyarderVineyarder Registered User Posts: 80 Junior Member
    My D19 has applied to Parsons School of Design's BBA program in strategic design and management, and with her grades, scores and talent, we're very confident she'll be admitted (it's both her safety school and her first choice, which is a good position to be in). We're hopeful she'll get a decent merit scholarship--they seem to range up to about half of tuition (not including room and board). All admitted students are considered for them, and it would really help since it's a hugely expensive school and we won't qualify for any FA.
    https://www.newschool.edu/student-financial-services/scholarships-and-grants/
  • SybyllaSybylla Registered User Posts: 2,645 Senior Member
    @Vineyarder this thread is about actual known merit. It sounds like you are just hoping for merit at this point.
  • VineyarderVineyarder Registered User Posts: 80 Junior Member
    Apologies, I thought people were also sharing information about merit scholarships they were aware of. I’ll return with details after we hear.
  • SybyllaSybylla Registered User Posts: 2,645 Senior Member
    edited October 29
    The trouble with some unknowns, For example, your school has a coa of over 65K a year

    >>Merit-Based Gift 334 (36.1%) of freshmen had no financial need and received merit aid, average amount $11,241<<<(collegedata)

    bargain, right? takes you down to 248K. For a non selective school with an average ACT of 26 and high school UW GPA of 3.4.

  • VineyarderVineyarder Registered User Posts: 80 Junior Member
    Yes, it’s expensive, but I’m not sure of your point. It’s one of the best art and design schools in the world, so it can’t fairly be reduced to its average ACT score or GPA. I’ll update everyone on our D’s merit award when she gets it.
  • BillymazeBillymaze Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    thanks for the info
  • crknwk2000crknwk2000 Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    My D18 got into Butler University last week with $20K in merit aid. They have a great honors program.
  • Mom2QuadsMom2Quads Registered User Posts: 5 New Member
    Money isn't everything. Hi parents, my darling daughter, both an odyssey scholar and hispanic scholarship recipient at university of chicago is getting an experience and education I never thought she would get. She has been coerced into joining a BDSM club (yes you heard that right) http://rack.uchicago.edu that is fully supported and funded by the university. They go on field trips to scummy clubs (see GD2) that are actually funded by the university. They pay for students to go to these clubs where they risk being raped and abused. I am so distraught by this as a parent. I don't feel that my innocent 18 year old daughter has the ability to make sounds decisions around this. Don't send your children here. If I could go back in time, I would turn down all the money she received and send her to my local community college.
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