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How do colleges react to applicants who have great stats but are mentally ill?

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Replies to: How do colleges react to applicants who have great stats but are mentally ill?

  • AnonyMomAnonyMom 314 replies19 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 333 Member
    This is beyond appalling. Assuming you have received treatment and are doing better, which I truly hope has happened for you, it's hard to fathom how the college can justify this. Have you thought about talking to a lawyer to see if it is legally acceptable to force a student who has recovered from an episode of depression to leave the college? Doesn't the Americans With Disabilities Act have some sort of provisions for issues related to mental illness? I am wondering if this is a private or public university and if they have any provision for you to appeal their decision.
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  • ilikephysicsalotilikephysicsalot 17 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 20 New Member
    Well, the thing is I need a letter from the Dean if I want to transfer. So that would be taking a ridiculous risk, especially in my current state of mind. Besides, I really liked my school (except when they were kicking me out) and I don't want to hurt my friends who go there.

    It is pretty appalling though. I was a pretty damn good student when I was well. Better than most of the healthy people.
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  • -Allmusic--Allmusic- 6246 replies104 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,350 Senior Member
    How can you simultaneously be a high school student considering colleges, and a student forced to transfer from your current college? Only one of those two scenarios is the truth.
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  • compmomcompmom 10579 replies76 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 10,655 Senior Member
    The original poster, Ilikephysicsalot, never said he/she was a high school student, at least in the first few posts I just reviewed. If you read them while knowing that this student is applying as a transfer student, all the posts still fit that scenario.

    These "appalling" things also happen to students with medical illnesses and disabilities, for illnesses that are not at all life-threatening or disruptive to anyone else.

    Colleges, rather than working harder to accommodate the student, make threats that if the student does not leave voluntarily, it will become involuntary and will go on the student's records. Some schools require students to leave if they suffer an illness that exceeds two weeks, a tricky proposition for those with chronic conditions.

    There can be stringent conditions for return, such as working full-time 6 months, and some of the small, apparently nurturing colleges force students to reapply, entirely.

    Language in communications from the schools tends to be punitive and lacks any hint of kindness.

    While liability is an important factor, I believe money is the root of a lot of this (financial loss when a student leaves, and a slot wasted), as well as rankings issues such as graduation rate. Forcing students to leave may also avert future lawsuits based on inadequate accommodations. And, let's face it, accommodating students with any "special" needs is inconvenient and cumbersome, to say the least.

    The ADA is not all that helpful on the college level, currently, but case law is being established that may change things.
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  • ilikephysicsalotilikephysicsalot 17 replies3 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 20 New Member
    The original poster, Ilikephysicsalot, never said he/she was a high school student, at least in the first few posts I just reviewed. If you read them while knowing that this student is applying as a transfer student, all the posts still fit that scenario.

    Yeah, I didn't want to tell you guys that for a while because knowing I'm a transfer student is a pretty good clue to my identity. (Harvey Mudd gets, what, 100 transfer apps a year?)
    These "appalling" things also happen to students with medical illnesses and disabilities, for illnesses that are not at all life-threatening or disruptive to anyone else.

    Now that's really awful.

    And thanks again for the helpful advice, guys. :)
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  • collegealum314collegealum314 6683 replies85 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,768 Senior Member
    ^^Have you ever seen those Brain health programs on PBS? There's a doctor that has an hour or two program, and one of the things he talks about is how to combat depression. I think he is a neurologist. A lot of the things he says, both in terms of psychiatric and physiological insights, is quite novel. The main psychiatric strategy is to "kill the A.N.T.S." meaning Automatic Negative Thoughts.

    You should check it out.

    I can't put youtube links on here, but if you youtube "change your brain, change your life" the entire programe will come up.
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  • MomPhDMomPhD 250 replies63 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 313 Member
    Well, the "good" thing about Mudd for a student hoping to transfer in is that maybe 15% of any given class transfers out over the 4 years.
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  • MomPhDMomPhD 250 replies63 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 313 Member
    Another insight on reasons why colleges are hesitant to accept students with illness histories--they are potential future drop-outs, or may take more than 6 years to graduate. US News uses freshman retention and 6-year graduation rates in their rankings. Small schools can see their ranking affected when even a handful of students transfer out or don't graduate.
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