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Pre-med advice/chances?

24

Replies to: Pre-med advice/chances?

  • purplerocketmanpurplerocketman Registered User Posts: 28 Junior Member
    Is there a small list of DO and MD schools you have in mind that I should apply to?
  • purplerocketmanpurplerocketman Registered User Posts: 28 Junior Member
    Sounds good!
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 10,196 Senior Member
    edited August 2018
    Not really.

    ONLY apply to MD programs if your MCAT is 511 or higher.
    Try NYMC, Rosalind Franklin, maybe Loyola, UC-Riverside IF and ONLY IF you have ties to the Inland Empire

    If you're fluent in Spanish, think about applying to the Puerto Rican schools--Ponce, San Juan Bautista, and Central del Caribe. (Instruction is in English, but many of your patients will all be Spanish speakers)

    For DO programs--

    Do you have a geographic preference? Urban vs rural?

    Here's a map of DO programs with links to each program's admission page

    --https://www.aacom.org/news-and-events/publications/2018-2019_cib/admissions-offices

    Pick 15 DO programs that appeal and apply to all of those.

    IIRC, AZCOM requires a 508+ MCAT to be considered for admission.
  • purplerocketmanpurplerocketman Registered User Posts: 28 Junior Member
    What do you think the GPA and MCAT cutoffs are for the tiers of MD programs and DO school?
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 10,196 Senior Member
    edited August 2018
    DO schools --College Information Book 2018-19

    MD Schools --Medical School Admission Requirements

    The CIB is free; you'll need to pay AMCAS $30 to see the full MSAR information for each school.

    I strongly recommend you skip applying to any med school where your stats (MCAT or GPA) are at or below the 25th percentile for admitted students; and absolutely do not apply anywhere your stats are below the 10th percentile. Those application fees will be merely donations. Also read the admissions webpages of each & every school you are thinking to applying to to see if there are any other restrictions/requirements on applicants.

    Don't bother applying to any state med schools unless it' s your home state.
  • purplerocketmanpurplerocketman Registered User Posts: 28 Junior Member
    How should I treat schools that have lower than around 20% out of state acceptance rate? Are those impossible for anyone to get into except for out of state kids with the highest grades and scores?
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 10,196 Senior Member
    edited August 2018
    Do not apply to OOS publics unless you meet one of these situations:

    1) your stats are significantly above the average in-state accepted student's

    2) you have a strong tie to the state (graduated from high school there, have immediate family members living in the state) AND your stats are at or above the average in-state accepted student's

    In case 1, your stats help to tfluff up the school's ranking.

    In case 2, the med school hopes that you will stay and practice medicine there after you graduate

  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 76,182 Senior Member
    @purplerocketman

    You keep emphasizing “top MD”or “top DO” schools.

    You need to understand...the person who graduates at the bottom of the MD or DO program will still be called doctor.

    From what I understand...your actual specialty isn’t based on your MCAT score or the MD or DO School from which you graduate. It’s based on your Step tests, LOR and marks during rotations, and your interviews.

    You have to figure out your end game. What specialties are you interested in? If it’s something
    Ike surgery or dermatology...you will need to be at the top of your game all the way through MD or DO school.

    I’m not understanding your comments about top this and top that.

  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 76,182 Senior Member
    I thought of a couple of other things.

    There are some DO schools (and highly regarded ones) where the mission of the school is primarily to help train primary care doctors for the region in which the school is located...or in other underserved areas. So...if you interview...be honest...if you don’t plan to do that, tell them. And yes, this might mean you won’t get accepted.

    Another important question....you are on a six year plan to finish undergrad. Any loans in the mix already. MD and DO schools have precious little aid beside Loans, loans and more loans...with tuition and living expenses and expensive books, and expensive tests, you can look at $75,000 a year or MORE for the years of training to become a doctor.

    And you won’t be able to work...At. All. while you are in MD or DO school.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 76,182 Senior Member
    You need your experiences BEFORE you send in your applications...although shadowing can continue during your gap year.

    So...adding ECs during your gap year isn’t going to help if you apply before the gap year even starts.

    As suggested...get certification as a CNA or medical assistant...or scribe...and find work doing that.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 76,182 Senior Member
    And one more thing...why are you on a 5 year plan to get your undergrad degree?

    You will have required classes the first two years of medical school...no choices about taking a “lighter load” for any reason.
  • purplerocketmanpurplerocketman Registered User Posts: 28 Junior Member
    @thumper1
    To you’re first post, I was mentioning top schools because I had the assumption from other postings that residency programs care about the rank of the medical school, but now that is clear thank you. I understand it would take 6 years to finish all undergrad, and money isn’t really an issue. The biggest reason for doing a fifth year is because I couldn’t quite get the hang of school my freshman year, even though I worked extremely hard, nothing was coming easy to me. So, I figured that the biggest thing I need to concentrate on is my GPA, and I figured the best way I could do that was to spread out my units and make sure that I was able get a lot of hours in for my extracurriculars while maintaining stellar grades.

    My other option was to graduate in four years then spend 2 years on gap years to add hours to my extracurriculars and possibly work as a CNA or scribe. I think the biggest obstacle for 4 years of school and a gap year is when I would take the MCAT. I feel that I would possibly need to dedicate an entire summer or at least half a summer to studying for it.
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 10,196 Senior Member
    @purplerocketman

    The MCAT requires substantial individual preparation even if the material is fresh in your mind. Everyone needs several weeks to several months of dedicated preparation. The MCAT really isn't like any other standardized exam you've ever taken before.

    RE: your GPA and course loads

    What is your year-by-year GPA/sGPA breakdown? Have you demonstrated a significant upward GPA trend?

    Are you taking a full courseload each term? (4 academic classes/semester or 3 academic classes/trimester) Underloading will hurt your med school application. Adcomms will want to see you are capable of handling a challenging schedule that simulates the difficulty of med school.
  • BunnyBlueBunnyBlue Registered User Posts: 818 Member
    Some students whose GPAs are not quite high enough for acceptance to medical school get either a Masters degree in Public Health or a Masters in Biomedical Science for the purpose of getting higher grades and showing medical schools that they have improved in their studies and would succeed in medical school. As part of this, they try to do research and publish a paper. One would have to get a high MCAT score as well.
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 10,196 Senior Member
    edited August 2018
    @BunnyBlue

    Master in Biomedical Sciences = SMP. This has already been discussed earlier in this thread.

    Allopathic med schools really aren't impressed by a MPH since too many MPH programs lack rigor. Graduate degrees are not considered by allopathic med schools when calculating GPAs or making interview decisions. (Osteopathic schools will include any graduate science credits when computing sGPAs, but most PH credits are not hard science credits.)
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