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How hard is it for internationals to get into DO schools?

CollegianCollegian Registered User Posts: 157 Junior Member
edited May 2011 in Pre-Med Topics
Hi, I know that internationals getting into MD schools is next to impossible as some schools do not accept internationals and for those that do they accept basically no more than 4 out of hundreds per year (which is basically <1% acceptance rate) so what I wan't to know is:

How hard is it for internationals to get into DO schools?

I know that DO schools are basically on the same level as MD schools but that they are more -for lack of a better word- forgiving so to speak. Thanks in advance for all the responses/advice/help.
Post edited by Collegian on

Replies to: How hard is it for internationals to get into DO schools?

  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,673 Senior Member
    OK, it's good thing I'm not doing anything exciting tonight---

    I went to AACOM (like AMCAS only for osteopathy schools). There are 27 schools listed. 9 flatly will not consider international students. 8 will consider them--but I didn't pursue the each individual school's webpage--these may have special requirements to be considered for admission.

    The other 10 will consider them under special circumstances. Which vary widely and range from already being a licensed physician in your home country[!!!] to being a Texas state resident to holding an asylum visa to being restricted to applying to a single program on a single campus which only accept 12 students total. The most common requirement is to have attended 2-4 years of college in the US, including all science pre reqs taken in the US. Nearly all of these school require either an escrow account with 4 year tuition & living expenses deposited upfront or 1 year prepayment of COA plus proof of financial ability to pay for the remaining years.

    Oddly, different campuses of the same school often have different admission policies. (e.g. Touro in NY will consider students with certain visa types, but Touro in CA won't consider any international applicants at all.)
  • go4cornellgo4cornell Registered User Posts: 446 Member
    Thank you so much!!!!! That was EXTREMELY helpful :)

    I don't get this though:
    The other 10 will consider them under special circumstances. Which vary widely and range from already being a licensed physician in your home country to....

    If you were already a physician in your home country why would you go to med school all over again? Is that even possible since you would have had a medical degree (MBBS, BMBch, MD, etc.) already? I thought if you already completed your medical training in another country or were already a practicing physician you would just simply have to do your boards (i.e. USMLE & COMLEX) and after that you are free to start practicing. Is that wrong?
  • TuftsStudentTuftsStudent Registered User Posts: 570 Member
    Perhaps you are unable to get a residency here through the match, because of your test scores or something else. To the best of my knowledge, there is only one such program as WOWM describes it: NYCOM |
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,673 Senior Member
    It was Des Moines College

    http://www.dmu.edu/prospective_students/international_students/
    If you are an international student not currently in the U.S., follow these steps:

    Apply to Des Moines University using the appropriate application process.

    Complete the SAIS form and submit it to the DMU admission office.

    Provide documentation of professional licensure/practice privileges for your chosen profession in your country of citizenship.

    Upon acceptance to DMU and payment of your seat deposit (if applicable), receive an I-20 form issued by Des Moines University's office of the registrar.

    Pay the SEVIS I-901 fee (see www.fmjfee.com).

    Apply for an F-1 visa through the U.S. Embassy in your home country (see list of embassy locations).

    Prepay tuition, fees, books and expenses for your entire course of study at Des Moines University prior to April 30.
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