Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

English requirement

ImOnOneImOnOne Registered User Posts: 180 Junior Member
edited November 2011 in Pre-Med Topics
Most schools require 1 year of English coursework (2 classes). If I can get credit for 1 of these 2 classes should I just take the 2nd class and be done with the requirement or should I still take 2 English classes?
Post edited by ImOnOne on
«1

Replies to: English requirement

  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,542 Senior Member
    Every school has different requirements. Some will accept AP credit for Eng and some won't. Some will accept any writing-intensive course, such as Philosophy, so it doesn't necessarily have to be labeled "English/Writing".
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,194 Forum Champion
    Some will accept any writing-intensive course, such as Philosophy, so it doesn't necessarily have to be labeled "English/Writing".


    I think Kristin and some others wrote that their schools all accepted some kind of email explanation that some upper level non-English class that had a Writing designation or component was accepted.

    My son's school requires each student complete 6 credits of upper division classes with a "W designation" and we're counting on those being accepted since he used AP credits to skip Frosh Comp I and II. :)
  • IcarusIcarus Registered User Posts: 4,336 Senior Member
    Some will accept any writing-intensive course, such as Philosophy, so it doesn't necessarily have to be labeled "English/Writing".

    Like m2ck said, not all philosophy, etc courses are considered to be "writing-intensive" (and, to be sure, not all of them are - e.g. logic) - they have to be designated as such on the official transcript.... usually with a "W" or something.
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,703 Senior Member
    At D2's school, writing intensive courses are not only designed with a "W" after the course number, but includes a separate grade awarded by the university's College Writing Program for the writing portion of the class.
  • kristin5792kristin5792 Registered User Posts: 2,068 Senior Member
    I think Kristin and some others wrote that their schools all accepted some kind of email explanation that some upper level non-English class that had a Writing designation or component was accepted.

    True story. I had English credit for like, Eng 101, through a community college--this transferred to fulfill my university's freshman English requirement. On top of that, my school requires at least 2 writing intensive classes (1 in your major), which count toward English credit. Essentially, I had 1 English class (from that CC), 1 biology writing intensive class, and a large handful of other writing intensive classes (including 2 unintentional ones, what a nightmare).

    Called my schools. Explained it to them. Basically they told me to email them (or use their online "update your file" thing) an explanation of what I just told them and the course description from the course catalog and everything would be fine.

    Personally, I hated formal English classes (don't know why, because I enjoy writing) and wanted to get them over with ASAP. I took it thru the CC and never looked back. You should be fine with either approach, so just do whichever sounds more appealing to you!
  • plumazulplumazul Registered User Posts: 1,744 Senior Member
    @kristin,
    ... my school requires at least 2 writing intensive classes (1 in your major), which count toward English credit.

    1 in your major? I've never seen this before, and I've been thoroughly checking all the schools on my list (currently 26). Is this requirement rare?
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 72,133 Senior Member
    plumazul wrote:
    1 in your major? I've never seen this before, and I've been thoroughly checking all the schools on my list (currently 26). Is this requirement rare?

    Undergraduate Communication Requirement: About indicates that MIT requires all students take two communication intensive courses in humanities, arts, or social studies, and two more in his/her major, for four total.
  • plumazulplumazul Registered User Posts: 1,744 Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus,
    I assumed she was talking about her current MS, not her UG.
  • kristin5792kristin5792 Registered User Posts: 2,068 Senior Member
    Sorry for the confusion--I meant, my undergraduate requirements are as follows: freshman English, 5 credits (which I met through CC transfer credit) + 1 writing intensive, 3 credits (I blew this one out of the water by unintentionally enrolling in a few WIs) + 1 writing intensive in your major, 4+ credits.

    As far as I know, medical schools don't specify where your writing intensive credits ought to come from (that is, if you're using WIs to fulfill English requirements).
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,194 Forum Champion
    my school requires at least 2 writing intensive classes (1 in your major), which count toward English credit.
    =======================================
    1 in your major? I've never seen this before, and I've been thoroughly checking all the schools on my list (currently 26). Is this requirement rare?



    UAlabama requires 6 upper-division credits with the W designation and at least one class (preferably both) has to be in your major. You are also allowed to use a UHP (honors program) upper-division class with the W or a class in a double major or minor with signed permission. But, you have to have 2 classes or 6 credits with W designation in upper-division.

    Older son's W requirements for Math were fulfilled taking "History of Math" with extensive writing, an honors creative writing class, and a Philosophy class, so he had 9 upper-division credits with a W designation.

    Younger son's W requirement will be a 6 credit ChemE class that has extensive writing. He's not looking forward to that. lol

    I think that more and more colleges are requiring upper division classes with W designations. Too many professionals can barely write a coherent sentence, much less a proper paper using MLA or APA style.


    Edited to add...I now see that there was a confusion between UG and med school.
  • plumazulplumazul Registered User Posts: 1,744 Senior Member
    @M2CK,
    I think that more and more colleges are requiring upper division classes with W designations. Too many professionals can barely write a coherent sentence, much less a proper paper using MLA or APA style.

    My University was one of the pioneers in this area. There is a University wide Professional Writing requirement.

    I plan to take English 395 (Writing in the Health Professions) :)

    History of PWP
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,542 Senior Member
    "writing-intensive" ..... have to be designated as such on the official transcript.... usually with a "W" or something.

    Not necessarily. Some (many?) colleges will designate/list courses in other departments that satisfy the college's own Writing requirement. But that course doesn't necessarily have a 'W' next to its name.* The point is that if an undergrad college will accept the non-Eng course for fulfillment of its Eng/Writing requirement, the med school is likely to follow their lead.

    *A UC flagship, for example, lists courses in French (and other languages), Near Eastern Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, History, Philosophy, & Anthropology, et al., in addition to the standard English & Writing courses. While those courses fulfill the undergrad Composition requirement, only the latter has a W next to their name.
  • IcarusIcarus Registered User Posts: 4,336 Senior Member
    Sorry, bluebayou, gotta disagree with your post.
    The point is that if an undergrad college will accept the non-Eng course for fulfillment of its Eng/Writing requirement, the med school is likely to follow their lead.

    I agree that if a college designates a non-English dept course for writing credit, then med schools will accept that for the writing requirement. But if it's not noted on the transcript in some way - almost all schools do this by a prefix or suffix to the course number such as "W" (at UCLA) or "R" (at Berkeley) - how will med schools know about it? They sure aren't going to go hunting through the school's website. And the AMCAS reviewers only allow information listed on the official transcript to get onto the AMCAS application.
    *A UC flagship, for example, lists courses in French (and other languages), Near Eastern Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, History, Philosophy, & Anthropology, et al., in addition to the standard English & Writing courses. While those courses fulfill the undergrad Composition requirement, only the latter has a W next to their name.

    Which UC flagship are you referring to? I went to UCLA, and I can tell you that if it doesn't have a "W" next to the course number, it isn't accepted for writing credit. UC Berkeley, IIRC, uses "R" for a similar purpose.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,542 Senior Member
    Sorry, bluebayou, gotta disagree with your post.

    No problem, I'm happy to agree to disagree.
    But if it's not noted on the transcript in some way...how will med schools know about it?

    Not sure undergraduate colleges design their transcripts for the few students who apply to med school each year.
    ....noted on the transcript in some way - almost all schools do this by a prefix or suffix...

    Source?
  • IcarusIcarus Registered User Posts: 4,336 Senior Member
    Not sure undergraduate colleges design their transcripts for the few students who apply to med school each year.

    No, but they do design them (and course titles) to be indicative of the content of courses, especially if that course is valid for credit for writing/composition, etc. And I think my point stands, in that med schools won't know whether a course counts for the writing requirement unless it's on the transcript in some way. As they say about medical records, "if it isn't written on the chart, it didn't happen".
    Source?

    haha fair point - I'll amend my statement to "I've never heard of a school that does not do this in some way on the transcript, usually by a prefix/suffix to the course number/title" :)
«1
This discussion has been closed.