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Easiest med schools M.D/D.O schools to get into

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Replies to: Easiest med schools M.D/D.O schools to get into

  • Brian1Brian1 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    Are the other 70% therefore dead, i.e., without a pulse?

    Possibly, yes. Just stating facts, 30% is higher than competitive undergrads' admissions rates and much higher than a lot of admissions rates for other grad programs in many fields. Obviously OOS is much harder, but I'd be confident if I were applying instate and I think if you are an alright test taker you should be too.
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 8,818 Senior Member
    I'd be confident if I were applying instate

    You shouldn't be. Admission is quirky and high stats candidates (MCAT 35+; GPA 3.8+) get denied all the time since the school's mission and the needs of the state population (read: rural healthcare) take precedence over GPA and MCAT score during admissions. Students who are committed to returning home to practice primary medicine in rural communities are first in line when it comes getting accepted. Smarta$$ suburban kids from advantaged backgrounds come in dead last even if they have killer stats.
  • mcat2mcat2 Registered User Posts: 5,942 Senior Member
    Students who are committed to returning home to practice primary medicine in rural communities are first in line when it comes getting accepted. Smarta$$ suburban kids from advantaged backgrounds come in dead last even if they have killer stats.
    Well said. Many students, being young and inexperienced, mistakenly believe the admission criteria are mostly about each individual's academic merit. In our state at least, some special programs for recruiting those students not from advantaged background exist in the second tiered colleges only. If a student goes to a tier one college, he or she is automatically ineligible for such a program.
  • katwkittenskatwkittens Registered User Posts: 2,227 Senior Member
    One of the schools in Brian's list, ECU would be one of those schools WOWmom and MCAT2. They turn down students every year that get into UNC and Duke. ECU takes no OOS students. ZERO. They have a small class size and their tuition is one of the lowest, if not the lowest, in the US.

    There are people who move here and try for years to get into ECU SOM. They focus on rural primary healthcare and are seeking students specifically to fulfill that need. That also have a few slots for their scholars program of kiddos that are admitted as freshman and take slots from there.

    Again there are high stats students rejected year after year from ECU because they are looking for something very specific, and they know it when they see it.

    So "easiest" to get into, no, very far from it.

    Kat
    ECU also just opened a brand new dental school.
  • plumazulplumazul Registered User Posts: 1,743 Senior Member
    Well said. Many students, being young and inexperienced, mistakenly believe the admission criteria are mostly about each individual's academic merit.

    LOL, if that were the case then you might expect a see a well defined positive correlation between stats and acceptance percentages.

    https://www.aamc.org/download/270906/data/table24-mcatgpagridall0911.pdf

    Oh, wait a minute, that is what you see!

    And while I'm destroying myths, let's also destroy the urban legend concerning the increasing age of medical students.

    https://www.aamc.org/download/159350/data/table6.pdf

    The age has clearly been constant over the past 4 years (and beyond).
  • Columbia09Columbia09 Registered User Posts: 1,012 Senior Member
    This might be a stupid question but what is a secondary? Also talking about what brian was saying, is NYMC and SUNY Syracuse two schools that if you're a NY resident you have a very high shot at? I would think that most of the SUNY med schools would be pretty easy to get into if you are a NY resident.
  • plumazulplumazul Registered User Posts: 1,743 Senior Member
    This might be a stupid question but what is a secondary?

    Here you go,

    Let me google that for you
  • Brian1Brian1 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    LOL, if that were the case then you might expect a see a well defined positive correlation between stats and acceptance percentages.

    https://www.aamc.org/download/270906...ridall0911.pdf

    Oh, wait a minute, that is what you see!

    Thanks for the graph. Those look like really good odds. Confirms what I thought - that a lot of unqualified people apply every year and that explains why 45% of applicants or so get accepted (which is still pretty good odds imo). I'm surprised at the percentage in which many with low GPAs or low MCATs get in every year, especially people with GPAs between 3.0s and 3.2s! Unless they went to Caltech, that's a really bad GPA. And 30% of those with GPAs between 3.0 and 3.2 get in with "okay" MCATs like 30s and 31s. And I'm almost sure that the 91.5% acceptance rate for those with 3.8 to 4.0s and 39-45 MCATs is due to overshooting and being overconfident and only applying to the highest ranked medical schools (or possibly having bad ECs, which can be fixed easily). If they reapply to lower ranked med schools, they will get in. Looking at this graph should be comforting since a lot of people who should not be applying apply. If you aren't an idiot, you will be fine as long as you are realistic with target schools.
  • tomofbostontomofboston Registered User Posts: 2,373 Senior Member
    SUNY Syracuse medical school's accreditation is on probationary status due to certain "irregularities".
  • Brian1Brian1 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    You shouldn't be. Admission is quirky and high stats candidates (MCAT 35+; GPA 3.8+) get denied all the time since the school's mission and the needs of the state population (read: rural healthcare) take precedence over GPA and MCAT score during admissions. Students who are committed to returning home to practice primary medicine in rural communities are first in line when it comes getting accepted. Smarta$$ suburban kids from advantaged backgrounds come in dead last even if they have killer stats.

    This might also be yield protection. 35s and 3.8s+ are almost guaranteed admission, presumably to the highest ranked med schools. Comparing those with similar stats makes more sense and perhaps those with target numbers would "align" their interests to practicing rural medicine anyway. Also, very few of these schools are located in the true countryside, so I'm not sure how you differentiate between the suburbs and "rural communities."
  • Brian1Brian1 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    As for NYMC and the SUNYs for NY residents, posters say that the SUNYS don't really favor in state applications, but also say that NY is still a "decent" state to be in state at. Some were saying that the best three states for residency are Texas, Massachusetts, and New York. As for NYMC, it seems as if it's looked down on by everyone else in NY and is seen as a safety school, so presumably it's easy to get into.
    any NY residents get into a med school, but not a SUNY? | Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ] | Student Doctor Network
    NYMC Class of 2013 - Page 2 | Allopathic Class Threads | Student Doctor Network
  • Columbia09Columbia09 Registered User Posts: 1,012 Senior Member
    SUNY Syracuse medical school's accreditation is on probationary status due to certain "irregularities".

    What do you mean ? Did the school shutdown?
  • Columbia09Columbia09 Registered User Posts: 1,012 Senior Member
    So what does this mean now? And is it true that SUNY med schools don't favor in state students? Shouldn't they? I mean there are a lot of state med schools that ONLY accept in state students. That sucks for NY students though.
  • Brian1Brian1 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    According to this, there's not much of a boost, at least compared to Texas, Mass, and Louisiana. The percent of those interviewed in TX, MA, and LA who are in state is almost 100%. You can always get residency in one of those states after college, ha. According to posters on that forum, there is a "really high chance of acceptance" if you are in state in TX. Are NY state medical schools resonable to get into for in-staters? | Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ] | Student Doctor Network
    It's does suck, and I disagree with their incentives since it lowers the quality of matriculants, but you can always play the system too by establishing residency. I wouldn't worry about it now. Just keep your GPA up and I'm willing to bet you will get into a med school without having to relocate. If you have a 3.6+ the odds are in your favor that you will get into a med school.
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