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Pre-med choosing undergraduate and graduate

toberetobere Registered User Posts: 26 New Member
edited March 2015 in Pre-Med Topics
Is it true that only the medical students with the highest gpa get to choose their careers? If that's true, then would it be wise to go to not only an easier undergraduate college, but also an easier graduate college for the gpa?

Replies to: Pre-med choosing undergraduate and graduate

  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,440 Senior Member
    edited March 2015
    I think you're very confused about many things.

    All med students get to choose their specialties. It's just those with with higher USMLE scores have more options open to them than those who have lower scores.

    USMLE is a national standardized exam that all medical students take. They take the first one at the end of their didactic (academic) coursework--usually after they finish MS2; they take 2 more after their first year of clinical training. And a fourth one at the end of their intern year.

    Students with very high scores nationally are more likely to match into competitive specialties (derm, ortho, optho, ENT, etc.) than someone with lower scores, but a high score by itself is not a guarantee that you'll be able to match into a competitive specialty. There are numerous other factors -- research, letters of recommendation, clinical skills, etc.

    Many medical schools don't keep GPAs of their students. (The first 2 years are P/F.) You get written performance-based evaluations during clinical rotations during the last 2 years of med school. These are recorded and reported when you go to apply to residencies--and those are very important. But they aren't "grades" per se.

    Lastly, there really isn't any such thing as an "easy med school." Easy med school is an oxymoron.

    And undergrad grades have zero impact on anyone's ability to choose a specialty. You start over with a clean slate in med school.
  • toberetobere Registered User Posts: 26 New Member
    Got it! Thank you for clearing things up.
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