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40q

PasadenaSTCAPasadenaSTCA 83 replies5 threads Junior Member
edited March 2009 in Pre-Med Topics
If I got a 40Q..what percentile does that put me in?
edited March 2009
18 replies
Post edited by PasadenaSTCA on
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Replies to: 40q

  • arez10arez10 128 replies23 threads Junior Member
    If you can actually pull off a 40, trust me you don't need to question what percentile that is.
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  • HighHopeHighHope 130 replies13 threads Junior Member
    ^^ Totally agree with arez10
    If you actually got a 40 you would not be asking that question. LOL
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  • PasadenaSTCAPasadenaSTCA 83 replies5 threads Junior Member
    I didn't, my older brother did...he says 99.9% but i think it is too high...
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  • GoldShadowGoldShadow 6104 replies56 threads Senior Member
    It's around there, depending on the administration. Combined data for the last couple years puts it anywhere from 99.5-99.7 %ile.

    http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/examineedata/combined08.pdf

    http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/examineedata/combined07.pdf

    http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/examineedata/pubs.htm
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  • CalculusCalculus 520 replies70 threads Member
    A 40 is the real deal. If you're brother got that and has a respectable GPA and research, he should be in at a top 10. And yes, I've seen the data on the AAMC website, it's around the 99.99th percentile. I think the 99th percentile begins around 38. I take the MCAT next year and am still trying to find any site with data on examinee SAT and MCAT scores. I know a high SAT score correlates to a high MCAT score, but beyond that there doesn't seem to be much more.
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  • GoldShadowGoldShadow 6104 replies56 threads Senior Member
    ^AAMC doesn't give percentile data to the hundredths place. Like I said above, a 40 total usually falls around the 99.5-99.7th percentile.

    There's really no point in using SAT score to predict MCAT. People who take the MCAT are generally people who scored high on the SAT. Despite this, there's still a lot of variation in MCAT scores.
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  • CalculusCalculus 520 replies70 threads Member
    I was saying it was near that value, the hundredths place had no bearing on its proximity to the value.
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  • norcalguynorcalguy 7518 replies30 threads Senior Member
    I know a high SAT score correlates to a high MCAT score, but beyond that there doesn't seem to be much more.

    Not necessarily. A low SAT score (below 1500 or whatever the average is) definitely doesn't bode well for your MCAT score but a high SAT score doesn't necessarily indicate a "high" MCAT score (depending on how you define "high"). A couple of top 15 colleges have released the average MCAT score of their med school applicants and the average is generally around a 31 or so with the average among the successful applicants being 32-33. A 31 is not so bad but barely qualifies one for med school. Meanwhile, that doesn't even count all of the kids at these top 15 schools who didn't even make it to the application stage.
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  • Son of OpieSon of Opie 1193 replies7 threads Senior Member
    I don't know if "qualify" is the right word. "What gives you a good chance of getting in" is better.
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  • sports61khsports61kh 933 replies92 threads Senior Member
    quick OT thing, with the future shortages of physicians, would med school admissions become easier or harder? cuz we need more doctors, but on the other hand admission standards r going up each year (GPA, MCATs, etc)
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  • premededoutpremededout 34 replies1 threads Junior Member
    I believe the average MCAT for accepted medical students is 29. I find the phrase, "a 31 on the MCAT barely qualifies you for medical school" to be pretty counter-reality.
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  • GoldShadowGoldShadow 6104 replies56 threads Senior Member
    quick OT thing, with the future shortages of physicians, would med school admissions become easier or harder?
    The number of med school spots doesn't change for the most part, regardless of the demand for physicians (a few new schools opened up recently, but that's not exactly a common occurrence). More important is the number of residency spots, which also doesn't change a whole lot as far as I know. Any shortage of US-trained physicians is made up for by FMGs and IMGs... as far as I know.
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  • hubbellgardnerhubbellgardner 319 replies3 threads Member
    as my father recently reminded me, the toughest time to get into medical school in the past 50 years was the mid-1970's(when he was going through); height of the baby boom entering medical school, there were 3 applicants for every medical school position. The ratio now is more like 1.8 to 1. This is not a historically rough time.
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  • norcalguynorcalguy 7518 replies30 threads Senior Member
    I believe the average MCAT for accepted medical students is 29. I find the phrase, "a 31 on the MCAT barely qualifies you for medical school" to be pretty counter-reality.

    The average among ORM's (Asians/Whites) is actually a 31. You're not going to find many med schools with averages lower than a 31 so a 30 (which is what we tell you to aim for) is generally the lowest score at which you should feel comfortable about your chances. People like to quote 3.5/29 as the average but the "real" average (assuming you're Asian or White) is closer to 3.7/31.

    Anyway, my original point is that all of these students at top colleges had great SAT scores but, even after wiping out 50% or more of the weakest premeds, the average MCAT score is still only a 31 or so. Hence, if you can score 2100 or 2200 on the SAT, it is definitely NOT a guarantee that you will be okay 3 years down the line when you're taking the MCAT.
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  • Son of OpieSon of Opie 1193 replies7 threads Senior Member
    I would think there are way more than two applicants for every spot in medical school. That would mean the acceptance rate would be around fifty percent. I don't know what the recent numbers are, but it is most likely nowhere near half for acceptances.
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  • curmudgeoncurmudgeon 11830 replies298 threads Senior Member
  • vickpickvickpick 193 replies7 threads Junior Member
    I would say if he did get a 40 Q, 99.9 percentile is probably true no matter what AAMC says- I was looking at MCAT scores by GPA table and a gpa between 3.5 and 4.0 and MCAT score of 39+ guarantees admission to med school - so, unless u'r only applying to Harvard, you don't need to worry abt it..lol

    leaving the worrying to the rest of us who have between 30 and 36...
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