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Difference Between Loomis Chaffee, Phillips Exeter, and St. Paul's

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Replies to: Difference Between Loomis Chaffee, Phillips Exeter, and St. Paul's

  • geeza1geeza1 Registered User Posts: 25 New Member
    Oops, I meant "dress code". Dating myself.
  • classicalmamaclassicalmama Registered User Posts: 2,261 Senior Member
    GMT: to-die-for barbecue north of the Mason-Dixon line is a geographical impossibility. Just saying.

    geeza: Boarding School Review, where GMT pointed you a week ago, will tell you whether there's a dress code or not: casual means no dress code (well, there are probably rules to keep everyone decently clothed, but beyond that....)
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    @ classicalmama,
    The owner of this BBQ joint near Loomis must have bribed/murdered/robbed some Southerner for his/her secret recipe-- it's that GOOD
  • ajadedidealistajadedidealist Registered User Posts: 203 Junior Member
    Exeter alum here. I'd argue Exeter is very, VERY distinct. People are (were?) wonderful, proudly "different", intense, quirky, incredibly intellectually engaged, socially aware, highly verbal, ambitious...there was (with the exception of the requisite prep posse, which did indeed exist when I was there almost a decade ago) a real pride in being the weird/intellectual school. People were highly intellectual to the point of neurosis (myself included), and we all definitely suffered from a slight mismatch between our intellectual and emotional intelligence (which is to say we all thought we were WAY more mature than we were, which is probably true of most teenagers but exacerbated by the Exeter ethos -- the Harkness mentality extended to the social interaction, and we all overthought eerything). The teachers were wonderful -- really incredible -- both academically and in providing pastoral care.

    Exeter's a special place. I loved it and continue to love it, and continue to be close both to Exeter friends I made there, and to alumns I didn't really know in high school but became close to after. But it's also a distinct place, which means being a "good fit" really is important. I certainly hope that "distinct" quality has remained...I'd hate for it to become just another posh boarding school.
  • needtoboardneedtoboard Registered User Posts: 1,294 Senior Member
    Just a few more questions:

    1. What section of the SSAT does each school care about?

    2. Is there a certain subject that each school values more than the other?

    3. How much do these schools care about the SSAT?

    4. Do these schools have programs that are substantially better than others? (For example a phenomenal science program or arts program)

    5. What is the social scene at each school?

    6. How are athletics at these schools?

    7. How are the music programs at these schools?

    8. Which school provides the most clubs and community service?

    9. What constitutes as formal and informal dress code?
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    Are u agonizing over which of these schools to apply to? Or are u agonizing over which of these school's admission offer to accept?
  • classicalmamaclassicalmama Registered User Posts: 2,261 Senior Member
    Okay, I think people have been pretty accommodating here, but you really, really need to not ask questions about stuff--like clubs, athletics, SSAT scores--that you can easily find answers to on boarding school review. Each school defines formal/informal dress code differently, but looking up the specific dress code on the school website (look for the student handbook) is easy. And all of those other questions have been answered many times on this board. Frankly, you'll show more of the independent, inquiring, intelligent mind that defines a student that goes to one of these schools by doing more research on your own and asking more finely tuned questions.

    And agree with GMT (while remaining deeply skeptical of his barbecue joint :) )--the time for thoughtful comparisons is AFTER you get accepted by more than one of these incredibly selective schools.
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    8. Which school provides the most clubs and community service?
    Does it really matter how many clubs a school has if u don't care about most of them? How many different cable tv channels do u have at home? When was the last time u watched MSNBC or CSPAN?
  • needtoboardneedtoboard Registered User Posts: 1,294 Senior Member
    More clubs means more opportunities. For example one school may have more service clubs than the other and I actually do watch MSNBC often.
  • booklady123booklady123 Registered User Posts: 319 Member
    @needtoboard, you're missing the point. Most of your questions can be answered by spending a little time at boardingschoolreview.com and the individual schools' websites. Put that time in.
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