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Schools with strong computer science?

MikachuuMikachuu 2 replies1 threads New Member
My DS loves computer science and would love to apply to boarding schools that are strong in this area. Any exciting schools/programs out there for a tech junkie?
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Replies to: Schools with strong computer science?

  • ChoatieMomChoatieMom 5319 replies248 threads Senior Member
    edited January 2018
    Pretty much all of the boarding schools discussed here are strong in technology and will be able to satisfy a tech junkie. Our son, who is currently on the competitive Cyber Team at USMA, was looking for tech challenge and chose Choate in 2011. Since then, and since he graduated, Choate has heavily invested in technology both for the classroom experience as well as for student development and exploration. If you are able, you should definitely visit and check out the Laphier Center:

    https://www.choate.edu/academics/academic-facilities/lanphier-center

    Choate also has an Advanced Robotics concentration:

    https://www.choate.edu/academics/signature-programs/advanced-robotics-concentration

    Our kiddo got what he needed and wanted there.
    edited January 2018
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  • HMom16HMom16 705 replies18 threads Member
    St. Paul's is very strong in engineering / technology / computer science (among other things.) Courses include everthig from computer graphics to artificial intelligence. There are multiple CS classes, as well as an engineering honors program.

    https://www.sps.edu/page/academics/departments/science
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  • happarent6happarent6 36 replies0 threads Junior Member
    The existence of dedicated CS teachers and multiple CS class offerings was an important factor in our DS’ BS selection process. Deerfield has a rich selection of CS courses (Intro, AP, Data Structures and Algorithms, Digital Logic, Robotics etc.). His Data Structures and Algorithms class has only five students which makes for a sublime learning environment. Our DS has been inspired by the experience and is considering majoring in CS in college.
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  • MikachuuMikachuu 2 replies1 threads New Member
    Thank you so much for the wonderful suggestions!

    We'll be sure to take a look at these schools. Any thoughts on schools that might be a little less competitive in the admissions process? Something for a kid with an overall SSAT in the low 80's.
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  • potterpointspotterpoints 33 replies12 threads Junior Member
    edited January 2018
    I know Peddie has a great program for technology and robotics. They're not a TSAO school, but still very strong.
    edited January 2018
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  • gungabluegungablue 109 replies0 threads Junior Member
    My son has been programming since he was 8 and he has had wonderful opportunities in CS at Andover. For example, the seminars this term include Data Visualization, Open Source Movement, and Data Structures and Algorithms. Last year, there was Machine Learning and Data Mining. There is huge demand and the options are increasing. The reason my son chose Andover was meeting with a CS prof and being convinced that he could learn there way beyond what he already knew. There are many CS competitions and student groups involved in projects, building apps, and HackNEHS.
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  • ChoatieMomChoatieMom 5319 replies248 threads Senior Member
    edited January 2018
    OP is asking for schools that might be a little less competitive than those posted to date.

    Anyone?
    edited January 2018
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  • MikachuuMikachuu 2 replies1 threads New Member
    Yes! @ChoatieMom is correct. These are all wonderful schools and would be on our list of "reaches". We're looking for schools with an acceptance rate of >25%. Peddie is a great option. (Thanks @potterpoints!) Anything else?
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  • sunnyschoolsunnyschool 1244 replies31 threads Senior Member
    Check Peddie closely....I heard their Robotics is actually very new....it looked great but they limit the # on team. Check into how many other courses they offer (ie, the courses mentioned above at Andover => impressive!).
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5934 replies10 threads Senior Member
    George School has a great robotics program and team as well as some really nice opportunities for kids to do projects over the summer with companies. A lot of it is self-paced so it's not intimidating for a newbie but can be quite challenging for a kid like yours. Definitely not all the formal seminar options of Andover, though. There seems to be a fair amount of collaboration between the CS program and stagecraft, film, and art departments so some cool opportunities for RW applications (that are safer than self driving cars.) Definitely worth a look as it is far less selective than many schools mentioned here.

    Peddie has a fun maker space program in the summer. (Made me wish I were younger!) It could be an interesting way to explore more if you are local.
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  • FunintheSun1211FunintheSun1211 402 replies15 threads Member
    Any school of this level will have a very strong science program
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  • sunnyschoolsunnyschool 1244 replies31 threads Senior Member
    Science, yes, but computer science courses and EC's vary widely.
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  • sunnyschoolsunnyschool 1244 replies31 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    ^^ 2015 article; it's 2018 now so things may have changed as this is an area constantly evolving.

    Can't read the whole thing but when I googled a discussion from Reddit came up. This is more complex and has to do with affordability of hiring the best programmers/developers, which is pricey for small firms, and the Googles gobble them up.

    Programming/coding/etc is a passion for some kids (like the OP here), just like a sport or an EC or another academic area is for other kids. If he's interested in CS and wants to take more courses in this area, that is great - and this does vary significantly amongst different schools - so it's a good question.
    edited February 2018
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  • nynycasino1234nynycasino1234 423 replies36 threads Member
    edited February 2018
    Do you want to take higher level classes only in boarding school? or Do you want to start making money while in high school for your work? Two different questions and answers. There are many boarding schools that can provide first. For second one you have to go outside of school and be hungry. It is very hard, but doable even without contacts. And you may have to sacrifice other things. If you Google it, there are many examples of kids staring making money while in high school. If you are very good at it, you do not have to go BS for it.
    edited February 2018
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  • GMC2918GMC2918 894 replies25 threads Member
    Another thing to keep in mind (for any subject), is how many of those classes you will actually be able to take, given the school's graduation requirements & your course load. Going through the process with both of my kids, we were so impressed by the electives offered at many schools. But realistically, they would only have been able to take a few. It's helpful to make a rough map of your coursework - slotting in requirements & what colleges like to see (# of years of FL, lab science etc.) vs. allowed course load. Options for electives/advanced coursework usually starts to open up in Junior year. During my daughter's interview at Milton, the AO gave her a chart and went through it year by year with her, which was really so helpful.
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  • CaliMexCaliMex 1831 replies34 threads Senior Member
    @sunnyschool I think the author makes an excellent point that programmers who are passionate enough to teach themselves the latest will do better in the long run than those who feel they need to be "taught"... that is precisely because tech changes so quickly. That ability to learn on one's own is critical for a long-term career.... much more than a degree in CS. (These are not mutually exclusive, of course!)
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  • sunnyschoolsunnyschool 1244 replies31 threads Senior Member
    Right...that's what kids that are super passionate about CS do. They teach themselves "coding" or programming, in multiple languages. But where my son gets hung up is limited understanding of very specific math (algorithims, linear algebra etc). Sounds to me like the OP knows where the son is headed. If you want to be really good, you need advanced math.and CS too.
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  • sunnyschoolsunnyschool 1244 replies31 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    @GMC2918 - Yep, that is true - hard to fit in all the electives. Especially since those kids often want the other advanced Math/Science courses also.
    edited February 2018
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  • carpoolingmacarpoolingma 728 replies8 threads Member
    edited February 2018
    @sunnyschool @GMC2918 That is exactly what we are experiencing. In a way it would have been helpful to have mapped it out right from the get-go to see how tight the schedule is. On the other hand, kids interests can change significantly. Any map we made in the second half of 8th grade would be much different than the map we are now (finally) trying to figure out. And, I expect it will change again.

    The same is true for CS/robotics. DS entered school interested (but not passionate) in CS and robotics. The robotics team is basically a 2 season sport, so if he wanted to be on the robotics team, he would need to give up his winter and spring sports. To take CS electives, he would need to give up his arts elective that he really likes.

    I feel that within the boarding school structure, there is more room to explore different persuits, but there are still limits!
    edited February 2018
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