right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
2 DAYS until our "Ask The Expert" live event w/ the CC Dean, Sally Rubenstone, on Feb. 22 at 12:00 pm ET. Ask your question NOW if you are a registered member!

Understanding the URM hook world

amumof2amumof2 50 replies2 threads Junior Member
I’ve been reading CC and understand that being a URM is a hook.

What I don’t understand is how it actually works in the decision making process.
For example is URM female placed in a URM female category then if school needs 6 from that category they take the best (read as best fits their need e.g violin player, lacrosse player, FP)?

I’m just wondering if the pool that DD will be placed in is smaller therefore giving her the hook.

Would appreciate all thoughts.
9 replies
· Reply · Share

Replies to: Understanding the URM hook world

  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 29927 replies59 threads Senior Member
    There are no consistent rules on how being in URM category works. It differs from school to school. At many, even most schools, it makes no difference at all.

    At schools that are making a concerted effort to diversify their community, it can make a difference. One sees the difference in highly selective college admissions because most applicants do not have a hook. A legacy connection is not a strong hook anymore in itself when in highly competitive admissions situations.

    Its not as simple as a quota to be filled, and racial quotas, I believe are not legal in admissions. It is an additional factor to be considered. When a school has enough high scoring students with resumes that look so identical that you can’t tell one student from another— and, yes, I’ve seen stacks of them that look like clones stripped of details and identifying features so that sma student wouldn’t be able to pick out his own app, it doesn’t hurt to bring in some student who bring something to the school that isn’t there. It’s the rare bird.

    In cases like that, the question becomes whether or not the student can thrive there. The student is bringing something the college wants and is hard to find, whether it’s development money, celebrity, rare talent, or a representation of culture that the schools want.

    It depends upon how many URMs are applying in a given season, and the resumes of those in that pool of applications that determine the chances of getting accepted. It’s not a slam dunk having URM status, any more than it is to be an athlete looking to be recruited.
    · Reply · Share
  • one1ofeachone1ofeach 760 replies17 threads Member
    She’s asking for prep schools, not colleges.
    · Reply · Share
  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 29927 replies59 threads Senior Member
    Ohhhhh—sorry. Though that it is an individual school thing in the way it is considered still hold. There is no one consistent methodology used in weighting the URM factor in admissions
    · Reply · Share
  • amumof2amumof2 50 replies2 threads Junior Member
    @buuzn03 and @cptofthehouse thanks for responding. @buuzn03 your example kinda mirrored what I meant i.e. if everything else fills the need then would URM sway the vote if it is also needed.
    It's interesting because DD attends a private day school (very low # of URMs) where several are applying out and we keep running into the comment that she's 'lucky' because she is a URM. Kinda frustrating that many think that way.
    · Reply · Share
  • one1ofeachone1ofeach 760 replies17 threads Member
    When my kids were applying I was told “so unlucky that your kids are just white.”

    I know there are some boarding schools that are making a concerted effort to increase diversity of all kinds. I expect that at those schools it will be a help.

    I think the human factor is still a factor meaning if your daughter stands out for some reason that’s a boost. Her some reason may be that she’s a high stat urm and my sons may have been that he’s a high stat athlete. Or maybe they were both just really great in their interviews and connected well with the ao’s.
    · Reply · Share
  • CaliMexCaliMex 2009 replies34 threads Senior Member
    Your chances are best if you are FP *and* have strong stats. If you have both of those AND are URM, you should do very well.
    · Reply · Share
  • Happytimes2001Happytimes2001 1810 replies13 threads Senior Member
    Actually, I think it also depends on how many diverse kids usually apply to that BS. At some schools, the diversity numbers are very strong ( so I would assume it's less of a hook). At other schools there is limited diversity so it's likely going to have more impact. Some revisits or websites will spell it out quite clearly (that they want to increase diversity or are offering FA so apply) others don't have the same goals/resources.
    I think it often tips the scale. But I have seen some schools with really few URM. What does that mean ( that it's not important to the school? That they don't weigh it heavily, that less FA is offered so those who need it can't pay the fees?) Many URM are also full pay. So, look carefully at the school and try to figure out if you think they are sending the message that they want to increase diversity. Groton certainly was sending that message out a couple of years ago.
    · Reply · Share
  • CaliMexCaliMex 2009 replies34 threads Senior Member
    If you are URM and apply to a school with very few URM, you have to wonder whether you will be happy in a place without a critical mass of peers (and probably with no faculty) who can relate to your experience.
    · Reply · Share
Sign In or Register to comment.

Recent Activity