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The Benefits of Repeating

PurpoisePalPurpoisePal 1551 replies93 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
edited February 2013 in Prep School Admissions
What are the benefits of repeating, say, eleventh grade?
edited February 2013
43 replies
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Replies to: The Benefits of Repeating

  • D'yer MakerD'yer Maker 3348 replies73 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    There's another thread about repeating. It's from a while ago so I wouldn't expect you to ferret it out. But it made an impression on me and I remember it because of the following New York Times article that it linked to.

    The thread: http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showthread.php?t=210419

    The link to the NYT article: http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=F00713FA3A5B0C758CDDA80994DD404482

    Originally posted on CC by Burb Parent here: http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showpost.php?p=2729393&postcount=17

    Full text of the article shared by: NewD http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showpost.php?p=2759905&postcount=26


    If at First You Don't Succeed Enough
    New York Times Education Supplement, November 6, 2005
    By Abigail Sullivan Moore
    Abigail Sullivan Moore contributes to the Connecticut section of The New York Times.

    THIS fall at Avon Old Farms, a prestigious boys' prep school in Connecticut, 16 percent of the freshmen are transfer students doing the year for the second time. They include three straight-A students, says Brendon Welker, its director of admissions.

    Repeating the year -- in some circles known as a ''refresh'' or ''resoph,'' depending on the grade -- has become an increasingly accepted practice at private schools in the Northeast, especially boarding schools. At St. Paul's School in New Hampshire, 22 percent of the freshman class have transferred in to repeat the year, as have 6 percent of sophomores. At Kent School, also in Connecticut, 11 percent of juniors are doing the same.

    Traditionally, a small percentage of students have repeated a grade to allow them time to mature or to fill in subject gaps. Boys have done it much more than girls, often at the school's bidding. Some students have taken an extra year just to improve in sports. But many of today's repeaters are motivated by the intense competition for admission to elite colleges. They want to bolster already good academic transcripts with better grades, a richer roster of Advanced Placement courses and the extracurricular activities that colleges like to see, school officials say.

    To make their offspring look even more appealing, some parents are not sending transcripts from that ''first'' ninth grade to colleges, an omission that raises ethical issues. Their hope is that admissions officers won't see the stutter, says Marcia Rubinstien, an educational consultant in West Hartford, Conn., who advocates honesty.

    ''Five or 10 years ago, students didn't repeat unless there was something broke that needed to be fixed, a presiding academic deficit, an illness or some disturbance in the family pattern,'' says Gregg Maloberti, dean of admissions at the Lawrenceville School in New Jersey. In 2001, only a single student out of 150 incoming freshmen there was repeating the year; last fall 15 did it. This year, the school admitted 11 freshman repeaters.

    Mike Hirschfeld, admissions director at St. Paul's, has seen a noticeable increase. ''Parents want their kids to be successful, and if they believe repeating will enhance their chances, they will absolutely consider it,'' he says. In the past five years, a third of the graduates of St. Paul's received at least one offer from an Ivy League school.

    Of course, other factors influence the decision, like fears that public high schools aren't giving their children the best education. Families also want to make sure their children are mature enough to take advantage of the advanced curriculum at these private schools, and to succeed when the bar is so high.

    The practice leaves some college gatekeepers in an ethical quandary. While supporting the idea of giving students time to do better, administrators fret about the equity of a strategy available only to the ambitious affluent, those who can pay $25,000 to $35,000 a year.

    ''The ones who can do this are only the ones who can afford to do this,'' says Jim Bock, dean of admissions and financial aid at Swarthmore College. ''Where does that leave the rest of the people?''

    For moderate-income families seeking a similar advantage, and those in public schools, the answer is probably nowhere.

    At New Trier, a rigorous public high school on Chicago's affluent North Shore, repeating a grade to shore up a solid transcript is out of the question. ''The answer is unequivocally no, never has happened and I would not support it,'' says Hank Bangser, the superintendent.

    Some private schools aren't going along either. At Thayer Academy in Braintree, Mass., officials say they were amazed recently when a handful of its current upper-class students asked to repeat. Thayer refused, fearful of seeding the practice.

    School officials and consultants who help place children in top private schools know it's a hot topic among parents. ''There's a big ripple effect,'' says Andrew Bogardus, director of admissions for Berkshire School in Sheffield, Mass. ''Families are talking about their plan of attack for education, and college admissions is driving it. If someone has a successful plan, they'll talk about it.''

    One Westchester County mother credits her daughter with the idea of repeating sophomore year at a New England boarding school. Then a B student in a competitive public high school, she was feeling pressured about college admissions and knew another repeater. The parents talked to families who had found success with the strategy.

    ''The parents say things like, 'This was the best thing that I did,''' says the mother, who did not want to be identified for fear of hurting her daughter's reputation. ''She could be a B-plus student,'' she says, adding that an extra year of smaller classes and developing study skills would better prepare her for college, although probably not the Ivy League. ''Why rush?'' Meanwhile, the daughter feels a ''wonderful reprieve,'' she says. ''It's a gift we gave her.''

    Many people outside the world of private schools still view repeating a grade as something to hide. William M. Shain, dean of undergraduate admissions at Vanderbilt University, worries about the effect on an adolescent's self-esteem. He says it suggests ''you're not good enough yet -- you should go back in the oven.''

    But independent school administrators and students insist it carries no stigma within their ranks.

    ''People have a certain stereotype about repeating a year -- they think your grades aren't good enough,'' says Peter Hafner, who transferred from a private school in Bethesda, Md., to the Taft School in Connecticut, where he repeated his junior year to be more competitive in academics and athletics.

    Yet at Taft, ''I didn't feel funny,'' he says. ''It was a rare occasion when people didn't understand the dynamics.'' Once considered a bit shy, Mr. Hafner blossomed with a clean slate. He took Advanced Placement calculus, history, economics and other honors classes. He served on student government and played hockey so well that Harvard recruited him.

    Mr. Hirschfeld of St. Paul's confirms Mr. Hafner's perception. Instead of taking a negative view, he says, his students have the attitude, '''Wow! I can take a second year of calculus.'''

    Those who repeat sophomore or junior year in a different school are easy for college admissions officials to spot: students need to show records for freshman through senior year, so the officials get transcripts from both schools. Those who repeat freshman year, though, may not send transcripts from the first school.

    ''Families aren't always comfortable with disclosing an unusual situation,'' Ms. Rubinstien says. ''They are going to want to sterilize that application.''

    Steve Thomas, admissions director at Colby College, believes he wouldn't be fooled. ''You can't effectively erase a year to a sharp reader and if you do, the flags go up,'' he says. Any hint of deception is bad news for an applicant. Acknowledging that year, though, brings added scrutiny from admissions officers.

    Considering prep school tuition, some college administrators see repeating as an expensive investment with an uncertain return. Overloading transcripts with Advanced Placement courses may give an applicant an overly groomed feel, unwittingly undermining the student's chances at colleges that pride themselves on admitting bright, risk-taking individuals.

    Says Dick Steele, interim dean of admissions for Bowdoin College, ''I sure would expect a pretty darn good year with that chance.''
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  • PurpoisePalPurpoisePal 1551 replies93 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    OMG! That's insane.

    That's not what I meant at all. I got sick this year and missed a lot of school, and I wanted to know how bad it would look if I repeated.
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  • creative1creative1 1613 replies44 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    bumping up for discussion on repeating a year
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  • baseballmombaseballmom 1566 replies44 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Interesting article. Thanks for reposting it. I honestly don't see the downside if there is a chance that repeating any high school year benefits the student educationally and/or athletically. Is there a negative stigma to repeating 1st or 2nd grade? We see this all the time for young kids.

    Colleges routinely redshirt freshmen in order to get another year of fine-tuning/development for athletes while staying in compiance with NCAA rules. College students rarely graduate in 4 years anyway, so it's no big deal.
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  • prettyckittyprettyckitty 1313 replies50 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I've noticed there are a lot of repeat or fifteen-turning-sixteen-year-old 9th graders at Andover. It doesn't bother me much, though it occasionally makes me feel a bit young. We also have at least two twelve-year-olds, though, so I guess different people come when they're ready. I haven't got a problem with it, unless it's really not good for the kid doing it. Whatever's best for them.
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  • D'yer MakerD'yer Maker 3348 replies73 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I disagree with the stigma part. Also, I can't speak to high school repeats, but I do think there's a difference between college athlete redshirts and high school refreshes.

    Regarding the stigma, I believe that young students who are forced to repeat a grade are stigmatized. Frequently I've met kids who, when asked their age or grade, will explain that they were held back or repeated a grade. They are very much aware that they're not on track and they understand that others will perceive this. And one thing's for sure, all their friends who were promoted know the kids who didn't move along. When possible, it's far better to advance the kids and give them remedial help to get them caught up than to just have them repeat a grade.

    At the high school level, when students are changing schools and recreating their identities and starting fresh, this stigma is less pronounced. It might not even exist. But I would be remiss if I were to note that, when moving to a private school, repeating a grade has an economic downside in the form of one additional year's worth of tuition, etc. That's hardly a minor matter. It's hard to say that there's no downside. That economic cost is actually a big concern because the repeating opportunity could very well be an option reserved for the wealthy. I wonder...how often are full FA applicants asked to repeat?

    Then there's a matter of integrity -- meaning how is this disclosed? In college, there are colloquial terms used to differentiate between redshirt athletes and those who aren't redshirted. When a student-athlete is described, her academic grade and eligibility are both indicated as separate matters. That's how we get terms like "true freshmen" and "red-shirt freshman" and "a senior with an additional year of eligibility." At Notre Dame and a number of the schools that we competed against, many of the players actually finished college in three years, so that they could get an college degree AND an MBA all within their window of athletic eligibility. This applied to a number of NFL athletes -- about the biggest jocks going -- I knew from ND, Michigan, Michigan State, and Southern Cal. (Then there are the majority of college athletes in revenue sports who never get a single degree, but that's getting really far off course.) The point is that the red-shirt experience is all on the up-and-up. Full disclosure. It's arguably the most public and widely known academic information that gets released regarding a student-athlete nowadays. I wonder, however, how many refresh and resoph students are as forthcoming about that fact. What do the college admission offices see?

    And at the schools, I don't think it's widely known which students are refresh and resoph students. Why not? Because it would stigmatize them, perhaps?

    The fact of the matter is that repeating a grade is an academic opportunity that only a few people can purchase. Now maybe it's something that the nation would benefit from if it was available on a universal basis. It would be great to have freshman classes pretty much synchronized to maturational development so that, in theory, the colleges are looking at seniors who are likewise at a stage where they'll be mature enough to handle the rigors of the college experience. The weird thing about this is that, in theory, the boarding schools that do most of the refreshing and resophing have their students better prepared for the leap to college anyway.

    If money is no object and you think you'll gain an advantage in college admissions by presenting them your 10-13 years of school instead of your 9-12 years, then I agree, there's probably little downside...for the individual.

    Institutionally speaking, however, I think the process is suspect even though I do understand that it may be one of those necessary evils that make the boarding school experience possible for everyone who sips from that ladle.
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  • keylymekeylyme 2778 replies47 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My son was thrilled to repeat...no stigma at all. He knows several "repeaters". We overheard some girls talking about him at a soccer game and they were asking if he was a freshman. One of them said "he's 15". Another said, age means nothing here. Which is true. They are so many repeats and reclassifies and PG's that it just doesn't matter. With lots of kids repeating kindergarten or first grade or parents just waiting a year to start their child in school, there is quite a mixture of ages in any grade.
    My son is almost full fa, so yes the extra year is offered regardless of financial status.
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  • PeriwinklePeriwinkle 3403 replies105 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    College admissions officers can tell from the birthdate who's an "older" applicant, and who's on the young side. I don't know that it matters. The only person who will really worry about it may be the parent of a competing applicant, although I don't know if a college will count an extra year as a net postitive or a net negative.

    Many students won't show up as repeaters, because their age will lie within the normal parameters of college seniors. There is the open question as to whether it's fair to individual students to require them to begin school based on their birthdate, rather than their maturity.

    I think it's a decision best left to the individual student. Parents get too tied up in the question of college admissions. The best approach should be to find the best high school experience for each student, rather than worrying about college.
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  • baseballmombaseballmom 1566 replies44 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    From the article (I don't know how to properly "quote" it.)

    "The practice leaves some college gatekeepers in an ethical quandary. While supporting the idea of giving students time to do better, administrators fret about the equity of a strategy available only to the ambitious affluent, those who can pay $25,000 to $35,000 a year."

    Comments like this are anecdotal and fashionable.

    Most on this board familiar with the endowments and FA awards at preps realize that this assumption is simply incorrect. Sure, the vast majority of students at preps are full pay, but these are private schools! Who cares if the kid repeats sophomore year or does a PG year? It's the family's private decision for goodness sake and they're paying for it! We have public schools for everyone, and at those schools, there are age limitations and laws at play.

    Are colleges going to penalize the wealthy kid for obtaining a private education? And what about the poor, full aid minority who had the opportunity to attend a top prep and as a result, is now well-educated and presents a top-notch application? Are colleges going to tag his file because he repeated freshman or sophomore year?

    I just have a hard time picturing a college admissions representative sitting there perplexed studying the student's transcript to determine which year he likely began kindergarten and doing the math. Then if he concludes that the kid must have repeated a year of school, determines that it must be related to the wealth of the parents and not to an ethical reason that is acceptable to the college's idea of a "mulligan" year? All these assumptions and conclusions are then added into the admissions equation, leaving the administration in an "ethical quandary"?

    Not so much!
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  • keylymekeylyme 2778 replies47 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Also... many of the freshman "repeaters" attended public school for their first year; hence they are still paying for four years of private school, not an "extra" year.
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  • spideygirlspideygirl 3210 replies142 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    D'YER MAKER: "Regarding the stigma, I believe that young students who are forced to repeat a grade are stigmatized. Frequently I've met kids who, when asked their age or grade, will explain that they were held back or repeated a grade. They are very much aware that they're not on track and they understand that others will perceive this. And one thing's for sure, all their friends who were promoted know the kids who didn't move along. When possible, it's far better to advance the kids and give them remedial help to get them caught up than to just have them repeat a grade....The fact of the matter is that repeating a grade is an academic opportunity that only a few people can purchase."

    While repeating a grade in early elementary school, and then remaining in that school, can be a bit awkward, it is no way near as awkward as remaining in a class where your performance will not be optimized. You cannot just teach a student a few skills to bring them up to their classmates level when devolopmentally they are really not in the right (or even the "best") grade. Frequently, the reason for having a child repeat a year has more to do with the glue that holds everything together than straight academics. Children young in the school year (particularly boys) are usually (not always) easy to spot. Balancing a lunch tray, feeling awake in the afternoon, maintaining a strong pencil grip, and negociating the playground are some of the areas where a younger child might struggle. In middle school, this same student could be the one who is late to reach puberty (making changing for gym or playing many sports a challenge), struggles with organization, or feels lost in increasingly complex social interactions with his classmates. In high school, the challenges would continue.

    I strongly doubt that any parent, no matter how ambitious or rich, would change their child's grade without careful consideration of what is best for the child. No parent of a student who is excelling socially, academically, and athletically is going to play with that. Every person, rich or poor, deserves a chance to do their best, and every parent deserves the right to support their child in the best way that they can.

    If on a societal level the option to repeat a grade is not as available to everyone, that is no reason to punish the children who are able to access it. The assumption that less affluent students cannot repeat a grade is erroneous, anyway (especially today). It can be done. The stigma isn't necessarily that bad, if there is one at all. A kid will be much more embarrassed with a lack of performance than with a family decision to be older in the year.
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  • keylymekeylyme 2778 replies47 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    True, spideygirl, you can also repeat a grade in public school. When my daughter was a junior, we considered having her "reclassify" as a junior....the same option that is available at prep schools. We asked the guidance counselor if that option was available in public schools and were told that, while it is not advertised and not as common as in prep schools, it could be done. We did not end up having to do this....their were issues with injuries and we were concerned about my daughter being ready for recruiting, but everything worked out. My daughter was more than happy to do this and would not have felt at all stigmatized.
    My older son has a late birthday (end of August). He was only still a tiny little boy when he went to bs (although, emotionally more mature than my physically more mature younger son). He says that he wishes he had known about the re-fresh option as he would definitely have done it and he's envious of his brother.
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  • D'yer MakerD'yer Maker 3348 replies73 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Well, I start off pointing out that high school and elementary school are different in terms of stigma, and I'm sticking to the view that it's a significant stigma to hold a child back early on -- when other measures can be used to help a child close the gap with her peers. Those other measures may differentiate a child, but nowhere near as strikingly as holding the child back. And not permanently either. I've been around enough kids who've been held back. Kids don't volunteer, sheepishly, that they are getting extra reading help. They do volunteer that they were held back.

    As for the public school for 9th grade, they're still paying for an extra year. When you decide to pay for 4 years of boarding school instead of 3, that's an extra year. It may be just as many years as the true freshmen will spend in boarding school, but that year isn't free.

    But the real concern I have at the high school level isn't that parents are making bad choices or that it's wrong for individuals. My concern is that this option -- though becoming widespread among boarding schools -- is available to and utilized by a miniscule segment of the population and, though it may be wonderful if it was widely available, I think it is suspect.

    There's no argument from me as to people who seize the opportunity provided to them. It's the institutionalization of "refreshing" and "resophing" -- and the fact that it's used very selectively -- that I question.

    For instance, when TABS boasts that a higher percentage of boarding schools students are better equipped for college...do they also point out that a higher percentage of boarding school students had an extra year to be prepared? And I'm still concerned about the integrity -- again because such a small precentage of students actually "refresh" or "resoph" -- and how up front are the students and schools about pointing that out? We see from the TABS information, just as an example, that they suggest they're comparing apples to apples when that's not true.

    And, within a school, it could be terrific if each class was geared to a certain level of maturity...rather than rigidly classifying someone by grade according to the birth date. But schools don't do that. They have some kids repeat and others, who might very well benefit from repeating, aren't afforded that opportunity. So, while the "refresh" option might work just fine for the person who is doing that, I'm not so sure that that's part of the bargain or understanding for the students who don't go that route, for whatever reason. I would think that people who enter the school assume that they'll be with their peers only to learn that 9th grade is the new 10th grade. Or that 10th is the new 11th. While it may be great to say, "By refreshing, I'm a little more in synch now in terms of maturity/eligibility, etc." there's another side to the equation where it's equally apt for someone to say, "By these people refreshing, I'm a little LESS in synch now in terms of maturity/eligibility, etc."
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  • Momof2sonsMomof2sons 476 replies26 threadsRegistered User Member
    S1 repeated 11th grade when he transferred to a private school from our local public. If he had not done this he would have started college at 17 which although he was pretty mature, was a concern for us.

    This extra year made a huge difference for him in terms of study habits, drive and maturity.He is an athlete in a sport where many kids in our area repeat at least one grade and believe it or not 2 grades sometimes, so there is no stigma attached in his peer group. In fact in his sport, the average college freshman is at least 20 years of age (even in division 3). He feels quite lucky to be a recruited athlete for his college team at the age of 18

    It did not hurt him in college admission and actually provided some grist for one essay related to what he learned through the process of repeating.
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  • spideygirlspideygirl 3210 replies142 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    D'Yer Maker -

    Three boys from my daughter's Kindergarten class were "redshirted" because their parents felt they were too young after seeing them in school. I have seen a number of other similiar situations during my 16 years of parenting. I never once saw a child stigmatized because of it. I know children who feel bad about being taken out of class for extra help. I know one who doesn't mind (I am sure others feel the same). In any case, I have been around a lot of kids, and what I have seen does not match what you are saying.

    When a child really needs to repeat a grade, helping them with specific skills is not the answer.

    I also don't get your point that the option to repeat ninth grade is selectively available. Anyone can do it, in public or private school.
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  • drnanciedrnancie 438 replies23 threadsRegistered User Member
    Not everyone can do it though. For example, people who are paying their child's tuition may not have an extra thirtysome thousand to pay for another year.
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  • keylymekeylyme 2778 replies47 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Not to sound coarse, but if you can already afford to pay $30,000 per year, then you can probably afford a loan or a partial loan for an additional year if that is what you want to do (and you really feel it is necessary). My husband and I do not earn a lot of money, and we have done everything in our power to assure that our children get what they need. We will be paying for my older son's portion of bs (even my younger son's much smaller portion is difficult for us) for a very long time to come....and it isn't easy. We have made great financial sacrifices. I still think it really is an option open to just about anyone who wants to do it.
    D'yer, I really have to disagree with the whole idea of a "stigma". Back in the day (and I am not dating you, as I am certain we are probably close in age), I do believe that yes, there was a sort of "oh my goodness, Johnny stayed back" associated with repeating a year in the early grades. Now, it is so common, no one even notices. Many of my children's friends did "readiness" as 1st graders. No one notices. My son's best friend did readiness. It is really not a big deal.
    Also, I don't feel that the "refresh" year is a "secret" or a suspect practice reserved for only star athletes. Several of my son's friends this year at his bs are second year freshmen, and they are not select athletes. When we were first looking at this school for my son, we didn't know if we were ready to have him go away just yet....the coach was the first to suggest the repeat year, but we discussed it with many others at the school who were not aware of my son's athletic prowess and everyone told us that this was acceptable and quite common now.
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  • creative1creative1 1613 replies44 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I agree, keylyme. Your points ring true from what I've witnessed. In dd's frosh class, kids range from 13-16 years old. I doubt the students themselves much care or notice.
    Whatever works best for each kid's learning experience is the best path to follow.
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  • D'yer MakerD'yer Maker 3348 replies73 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Again, I have no quarrel with any parent who has made that decision for their own child. I have to assume that it's the best decision for that child. Some boarding schools have as many as 25% of the students in this boat, and I assume that that's good for them. Nobody's addressing how that's beneficial for the other 75% of the students.

    I'm not even against the concept. I'm against the way it is used selectively. Yes, public schools do allow for this. Sparingly. To do so, you have to move mountains, perhaps get approval from the school board itself, and there's just no way that it's available to everyone who seeks it. The fact that there's such an option, doesn't mean that there's an opportunity.

    The implementation, from the institutional perspective, is where this is flawed. I'll listen to the anecdotal experiences of how it worked out for this child or that child. I've yet to see the replies where this has been a boon to the majority of students who don't have the opportunity extended to them...or aren't even aware that there's such an option until after their child has matriculated as a youngish freshman or sophomore...and find that their child is even further back than expected. I won't argue that the parents of the repeating kids made the right call for their own kids. I'm challenging the schools to explain how, institutionally, it's beneficial from a utilitarian perspective to the kids when 3/4 or more aren't getting that option.

    There are plenty of authoritative sources pro and con from the NYT article. I'm not disagreeing that you all did what was best for your kids. I think that's a given for pretty much all of the parents who post here regularly. I just happen to fall in the camp of these people:
    The practice leaves some college gatekeepers in an ethical quandary. While supporting the idea of giving students time to do better, administrators fret about the equity of a strategy available only to the ambitious affluent, those who can pay $25,000 to $35,000 a year.

    ''The ones who can do this are only the ones who can afford to do this,'' says Jim Bock, dean of admissions and financial aid at Swarthmore College. ''Where does that leave the rest of the people?''

    For moderate-income families seeking a similar advantage, and those in public schools, the answer is probably nowhere.

    At New Trier, a rigorous public high school on Chicago's affluent North Shore, repeating a grade to shore up a solid transcript is out of the question. ''The answer is unequivocally no, never has happened and I would not support it,'' says Hank Bangser, the superintendent.

    Some private schools aren't going along either. At Thayer Academy in Braintree, Mass., officials say they were amazed recently when a handful of its current upper-class students asked to repeat. Thayer refused, fearful of seeding the practice.

    I said it before, but it seems to get overlooked: I actually think the option of repeating would be great if it is was offered and available on a universal basis. But it's not available at public schools (in any meaningful numbers), meaning that it's reserved for those who can afford boarding school (and can send their child away to BS; and who seek the full BS experience, which isn't for everyone, etc.) Most importantly, it's only available for those who know about it. Because even the private schools where this is most popular offer this in the shadows. This isn't touted in the viewbooks. There weren't any boxes on applications I've seen to check if you're interested in repeating a year. There are no disclosures on data sheets indicating the percentage of repeaters. I think some parents actually get duped...into making the wrong decision (or, rather, not knowing that they had a decision to make in the first place) because this isn't an aboveboard practice.

    If -- institutionally speaking -- this isn't suspect, then why don't schools advertise it or actively promote an awareness of it?
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  • D'yer MakerD'yer Maker 3348 replies73 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    By the way, I have come to the conclusion that this is one of the questions (or lines of questions) for parents to ask during the interview. I hope we can agree on that much:

    a) What percentage of students repeat? (Or, better, what is the age range for the current 9th (or 10th) grade class?)

    b) On what basis are students offered an opportunity to repeat a grade?

    c) What information can you provide me to help me make the best decision as to which grade my child should apply for at your school?

    For the financially strapped, the option may be to wait an additional year before applying as a repeat.
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