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Prep School College Early Action/Early Decision results for seniors

13

Replies to: Prep School College Early Action/Early Decision results for seniors

  • preppedparentpreppedparent Registered User Posts: 3,188 Senior Member
    ^^You have to be careful with this logic. Our student tried a small LAC instead of ivy for her early card when she easily qualified for an ivy. Keep in mind the small top LACS have few spots and the early round is usu saved for recruited athletes, first gen, kids from the diversity programs etc. So that didn't work. You have to use your early card wisely and choose a big enough school with enough seats.
  • infinityprep1234infinityprep1234 Registered User Posts: 423 Member
    edited February 1
    This thread is making me nervous as my kid(s) have grades, SATs, ECs, recognition in her field of study and much more, but dar(x) it we need need based aid and we are ORMs.
  • SevenDadSevenDad Registered User Posts: 4,122 Senior Member
    @infinityprep1234: I'm going to be less sanguine than doschicos and say (as a fellow ORM parent) that you SHOULD be nervous. Especially if your kids are targeting the usual suspects (Ivies+M/S) of the BS college application world. I've shared the story of 7D1 on other threads...she's was a NMF with great grades, scores, experience in her desired field of study, etc. etc. And yet, she went 1 for 4 on the more selective colleges in her application mix (vs. 5 for 5 on the others). In the end she chose a full-ride at a state flagship with a top 10 program in her major over the one "elite" school that accepted her. And it's been a great experience overall.

    I would recommend you heed doschicos' great advice in post #33, namely: "Look at schools that aren't the ones overapplied to by BS students".
  • preppedparentpreppedparent Registered User Posts: 3,188 Senior Member
    @infinityprep1234 as an ORM family agree also with SevenD, the bar is higher at the elites for Asian and other ORM kids. My student also from a top BS, Cum Laude, 4 year Varsity Athlete, but unhooked (national ranks and awards) also ended up at OOS State Flagship College. Top students will always have choices, but it may not be the ones you wanted. And I agree with ChoatieMom usu 99% of the time, including when its time.
  • infinityprep1234infinityprep1234 Registered User Posts: 423 Member
    edited February 1
    We have three kids, two girls are already attending different top ten prep school on substantial need based aid. We were not nervous when first daughter appiled to prep school as we knew that she can stay home and still get decent education.

    Our daughter is a junior and want to graduate in computer science. We are not looking ivies but rather top computer science program. Unfortunately Berkley, UUIC are vety top notch cs school, but do not give much need baded aid. Daughter is looking into MIT, CMU, Georgia Tech, NCS, RPI, WPI etc. But I read even those colleges are very hatd to get into. Nervous but will see what happens.
  • infinityprep1234infinityprep1234 Registered User Posts: 423 Member
    we are looking MIT, CMU as they are top CS school, daughter has done exceedingly well in the hardest course load at prep school, and have many outside awards and free or paid internship in CS. Not too many girls apply to MIT and CMU for CS from her prep school. Yes many thanks for the suggestions as we navigate the total new college admission process.
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,820 Senior Member
    all you have to do is ask your kids who is getting in where and look at naviance: URM, legacy, richie rich and athletes are the lion's share of acceptances to top schools
  • GMC2918GMC2918 Registered User Posts: 910 Member
    Maybe it's because I don't have a HYPS kid, but I think that the obsession with matriculation stats at that level is misplaced. At least if you're comparing high schools based on their matriculation rates. What I always wanted to know was: where do these schools send all of their OTHER kids? Which colleges are the kids at the bottom half of the class getting into? Are they getting into the colleges that they want and do they have good choices? Also, does the school have experience sending their graduates to a range of colleges: LACs, large state Us, engineering programs, service academies and so on. If their list is too narrow & deep, you will be competing with your classmates at every level.

    I think that one should assume that they will be in the middle of their BS class, and look at those stats. To choose a school based on how many kids they send to HYPS, with all of the caveats that @Center mentions, is foolish.
  • divdaddivdad Registered User Posts: 64 Junior Member
    edited February 2
    @GMC2918 @Center is 85% correct, meaning in my opinion and with the same anecdotal evidence he has (our kids go to the same BS), 85% of the HYPS kids are from the categories he mentions. The other 15% will be true national caliber academic superstars who won the national math, physics, chemistry competition outside of the BS or something along those lines.

    Thing is those 15% would have been HYPS with our without the BS. The marginal difference for a few may be that the education at the boarding school gave that kid the tools to win the national competition. Typical public schools do not have the true college level math and science courses (meaning they are substantively more challenging than a typical high school AP course and reflective of the kind of rigor you'd get at a top college).

    As for your original question, where do the rest of the kids go take a look here:

    https://www.exeter.edu/sites/default/files/documents/college_matriculation.pdf

    @GMC2918 keep in mind -- and this is the marketing pitch from the boarding schools -- the boarding school experience is a product unto itself and should not be equated with acceptance to a college. On many levels the soup to nuts experience you get at a HADES school is superior to a college including the Ivies. I went to Columbia and my intro Physics/Chem classes had a 150 people in them. At HADES schools the maximum class size is 12. At HADES schools you live with your teachers and have much greater access to them for support than you would your professors at a top college. And from what I've seen at BS alumni events I've attended the kids bond for life in ways that adults in college do not.

  • GMC2918GMC2918 Registered User Posts: 910 Member
    edited February 2
    Thanks @divdad , I agree with you! I have two kids in BS who came from competitive NYC HYPS-obsessed private schools. To be clear (not my strong suit!) I was aiming my comments towards BS applicants who, in my opinion, place way too much emphasis on HYPS matriculation stats at whichever BS they are looking at. To me, what's truly impressive about Exeter and other top schools, is the opposite end of their matriculation list. The questions that I posed were ones that I asked during the process, and which I found much more helpful than simply looking at HYPS stats. I was suggesting that applicants may want to consider the totality of a school's matriculation list, and not just the very top. Because, quite frankly, they can't assume that they will in fact be at the very top.
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,820 Senior Member
    @divdad I agree with you completely --100%--and I consider 85% the lion's share :))
  • divdaddivdad Registered User Posts: 64 Junior Member
    @GMC2918 I am from Manhattan too and am very familiar with the Dalton, Horace Mann, Brealey, et al crowd. I think you made the right choice with a BS. The boarding schools still have many of the same downsides as the competitive city day schools. The day schools have a significant number of children of celebrities, trustees, and Managing Directors that will always take priority over your kid in the college placement office. That still exists in the BS but because the class sizes are larger (250/class instead of 100/class) there is more wiggle room for the rest of us.

    The big difference I think is that in the day school if you want to hang out with your friend after school you may go back to their Upper East Side townhouse with them. And that same friend may never visit you in Queens, Brooklyn, wherever else you may live. In a boarding school, everyone lives in a dorm, eats the same food, and has the same lights out policy. Everyone has equal access to the school's resources and likely doesn't have a $250/hr private tutor waiting for them when they get home. By no means does a BS completely level the economic playing field, but they do a much better job of it than the day school can. And even for the wealthy, celebrity kid I think net/net that's a good experience.

    As for PEA, in my opinion, the top 2/3rds of the class all wind up at good to great colleges. The bottom third wind up at no better a college than they might have had they gone to their local public high school. Not everyone at PEA challenges themselves; some people coast, take the less rigorous courses and focus time and attention on things that are perhaps interesting to them but not to college admissions committees. In other words, you have to work hard at not working hard to wind up in the bottom third at PEA.

    And if you make the choice to wind up in the bottom third at PEA you wind up at your local state university with a major competitive advantage over the kids that went to your local high school. You'll still have a great life, have a fantastic network of BS peers for the rest of your life, and a nice career, you probably just won't grow up to be Robert Mueller (St. Paul's).
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,820 Senior Member
    @divdad "As for PEA, in my opinion, the top 2/3rds of the class all wind up at good to great colleges. The bottom third wind up at no better a college than they might have had they gone to their local public high school. Not everyone at PEA challenges themselves; some people coast, take the less rigorous courses and focus time and attention on things that are perhaps interesting to them but not to college admissions committees. In other words, you have to work hard at not working hard to wind up in the bottom third at PEA.

    And if you make the choice to wind up in the bottom third at PEA you wind up at your local state university with a major competitive advantage over the kids that went to your local high school. You'll still have a great life, have a fantastic network of BS peers for the rest of your life, and a nice career, you probably just won't grow up to be Robert Mueller (St. Paul's)."

    I think your assessment is overlooking some critical factors: there are many kids at PEA (and other schools) that are bottom third or middle of the pack and go on to better schools than their performance would warrant because they are legacy/URM/athlete and so forth. That pushes many kids out of those spots--down the ladder or sideways. Then you have a much under-appreciated factor in performance. The enormous number of repeats: 9th and 10th most specifically. There are tons of kids the grade below my kid that are older and have repeated. They generally have an advantage. Red shirting is not just for sports.
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