right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
We've updated the Topics page of our website to better organize and share our expert content. Read more about it here.

1560- retake or keep for applying for Princeton?

sevenbabiessevenbabies 17 replies27 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
DS is veeeeery interested in Princeton for economics. I think he has all of the right stuff to be a legit candidate- and we are also aware that it can be a downright mystery who gets in and who doesn't so obviously we are looking at a broad range of schools.
4.6 W/ 4.0 UW
#1 class rank
class president
varsity athlete
lots of volunteer stuff
etc etc.

Just got his first SAT back at 1560... ahhhh. Just missed one on each side- tough curve on math this time. Thought we'd ask here about retaking or just sticking with this score. Could it hurt him if it were to go down? Or can he just send the highest?
13 replies
· Reply · Share

Replies to: 1560- retake or keep for applying for Princeton?

  • BKSquaredBKSquared 1321 replies6 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    A 1560 won't be the reason he is denied. His time is better spent on his app's, maintaining his rank, quality time on his EC's, SAT2's if he has not ticked that box or just enjoying senior year.
    · Reply · Share
  • tgl2023tgl2023 86 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Just a reminder that Princeton requires a graded written paper, preferably in English or history, as part of its application process. I don't see a need to retake the SAT to better his score that is already among the top. Princeton values significantly their students' service to others, and your son has volunteer works to help demonstrate this. I suggest concentrating on the all-important essays and short answers. Good luck.
    · Reply · Share
  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5619 replies10 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Time will be better spent on other things. That score will be more than adequate to move his application into consideration.
    · Reply · Share
  • makemesmartmakemesmart 1423 replies14 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    If he hasn’t taken subject tests, he may consider doing that instead. 1560 is great. Good luck.
    · Reply · Share
  • TiggerDadTiggerDad 1844 replies70 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Yes, as BKSquared stated, 1560 won't be the reason your son is denied. It's better time and energy spent on improving the qualities in his other areas of application, particularly in qualitative aspects of it.
    · Reply · Share
  • DolemiteDolemite 2115 replies34 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Is your son a senior and applying this year?
    · Reply · Share
  • dropbox77177dropbox77177 263 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited September 19
    He can just send in the highest, but honestly at 1560 there's no reason to try again. It's definitely high enough.

    Many people on here will say, "a 1560 [or some other high score] won't be the reason he doesn't get accepted." Of course that's true, but it reflects poor analysis. The real question is whether a higher score could help in the context of a particular applicant's entire application.

    In my opinion, for the overwhelming majority of applicants, even a 1600 won't add appreciably to a 1560 application such that it would be worth the time to prep. Sure, if he won't waste any effort that would detract from other portions of the application, no harm in retaking again. But as others have pointed out, there are almost certainly better uses for the time.
    edited September 19
    · Reply · Share
  • TiggerDadTiggerDad 1844 replies70 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Many people on here will say, "a 1560 [or some other high score] won't be the reason he doesn't get accepted." Of course that's true, but it reflects poor analysis. The real question is whether a higher score could help in the context of a particular applicant's entire application.

    In my opinion, for the overwhelming majority of applicants, even a 1600 won't add appreciably to a 1560 application such that it would be worth the time to prep. Sure, if he won't waste any effort that would detract from other portions of the application, no harm in retaking again. But as others have pointed out, there are almost certainly better uses for the time.

    Poor analysis? Funny.... Aren't your statements here basically the same repetitive statements made by those who said "a 1560 won't be the reason he doesn't get accepted"? Or, am I just missing a hidden brilliant analysis?

    · Reply · Share
  • dropbox77177dropbox77177 263 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited September 19
    Fair enough. If you will forgive the bad form of quoting myself, I think I said it better here:

    https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/discussion/comment/22392651/#Comment_22392651
    edited September 19
    · Reply · Share
  • 1NJParent1NJParent 1274 replies35 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I'll go one step further. Retaking the test after scoring 1560 may make the college think that you're obsessed with high scores, assuming you'll send in both sets of scores for a "higher" superscore because the likelihood of one lower component score along with one higher component score in the second test is non-trivial.
    · Reply · Share
  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33603 replies369 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    "whether a higher score could help in the context of a particular applicant's entire application" Yup. Entire app and the supps. That includes how well you understand what you're applying for. It's never "just" stats.

    1560, at its most lopsided would be 800/760. Fine enough. But miss the rest of what a college wants and thud.
    · Reply · Share
  • brantlybrantly 3923 replies69 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Remember, he could do worse the second time. Zero reason to take again. Princeton rejects people with 1600, you know.

    His score of 1560 is high enough that he would not be eliminated for his stats. He's passed the stats hurdle.
    · Reply · Share
  • BKSquaredBKSquared 1321 replies6 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 19
    @DeepBlue86 post at https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/harvard-university/2157289-legacy-and-athlete-preferences-at-harvard.html#latest and the link to the paper published by Arcidiacono, aside from the deep dive into the various preferences, provides great insights to how "messy" holistic admissions really is and should put into clearer context the relative importance of standardized tests. Testing serves as hurdles and some relative positioning, but the yes/no decision hinges on so much more.
    edited September 19
    · Reply · Share
Sign In or Register to comment.

Recent Activity