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LucieTheLakie

LucieTheLakie Senior Member

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  • Re: Important advice for future students (and of course their parents!)

    While all the advice here is very good, and helpful, I just want to be careful not to scare scholarship students (or their parents) coming in with few (or no) AP or CLEP credits. You CAN get in and out in four years (unless you choose to go the co-op route - and that's a separate discussion) and hang onto your scholarship. You can even excel!

    If it's a foundation class (aka a "weeder") you're trying to make a decision about (e.g., chemistry for premed or chemical engineering; calculus and physics for mechanical engineering), I *would* recommend erring on the cautious side, unless you aced the AP test and also MASTERED the material in HS. Beyond that, yes, don't overload on STEM requirements, but I personally would not recommend taking classes just for an easy A (unless you're in jeopardy of losing a scholarship).

    Especially if you're in engineering (and probably a few other majors), the four-year curriculum as proscribed is very rigid, and you only have so many opportunities to take interesting, unrelated classes, so rather than look for what we called a "gut" in college, look for something that complements your major and other interests. Four years goes by very fast and there are so many subjects to study!
  • Re: UA versus UAB - 2017 opinio

    @Lorijb, in general, I think most students comparing engineering programs are comparing UAH to UA. Have you looked at UAH too?

    There a few parents I'm aware of who have had students at each. @SOSConcern has a child who graduated from UAB (not sure of the major, but it may have been nursing) and another in engineering at UA. @momreads had a student at UA and another currently at UAH, although neither was in engineering.

    Maybe one of them can help answer your questions more generally, however.

    The engineering facilities at UA are quite impressive and well worth a visit. I would also recommend meeting with somebody from the college as I've found them to be very helpful in answering questions and helping a student figure out what he or she might want to study. I would imagine both UAB and UAH would do the same.
  • So much more than a football school

    "New state-of-the-art adapted sport facility coming to #UA has a name"

    https://www.ua.edu/news/2017/09/adapted-athletics-facility-named-after-programs-founders/
  • Re: Schools known for good merit aid

    I feel like it would be more helpful to future families if folks listed the final cost of attendance for the family after any merit awards applied.

    While a merit of award of $25,000 sounds like a lot, if the total COA is $65,000, it may leave a final price beyond a lot of families. OTOH, if the full COA is $30,000, $25,000 likely makes it doable, as a Stafford loan could cover the balance.
  • Re: Question for Out of State Honors Students

    Unless you can schedule his Bama Bound session just prior to Honors Action week, I think he will have to travel two times.

    My son did, and I attended Bama Bound with him. And, along with his dad, I traveled to UA to move him in for Alabama Action. It was rather stressful as he didn't schedule BB until late July, so we were back within two or three weeks as I recall. Hopefully, you can get that last BB session scheduled, and if it appears fully booked, I'd pick up the phone and call to see if they can accommodate your son, given your circumstances.

    Keep in mind you're moving him in for the semester when you come for Honors Action - either send him alone to Bama Bound or just accept that this is a onetime expense and try not to dwell on it too much. I know it's hard. We had to travel to Russia twice in four weeks to adopt our younger son, so maybe that's why two trips to Tuscaloosa in a similar time-frame didn't seem as daunting or expensive.

    BTW, some kids actually move in without their parents too. I know it's not the norm, but there are a lot of kids on very tight budgets. Do what works best for your family.