right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

College Board is cancelling people's paid and confirmed registrations for March SAT...

1235716

Replies to: College Board is cancelling people's paid and confirmed registrations for March SAT...

  • PlotinusPlotinus 939 replies19 threadsRegistered User Member
    edited March 2016
    @jgoogs

    Do you know whether the exclusion of people over 21 applies also to subsequent testing dates?

    There is this clause in The SAT Registration Rights & Responsibilities of the Student:

    "In the event of a test security-related concern, public health threat, natural disaster, or terrorist act,
    the College Board may cancel testing for all or a particular group of test-takers."

    I still think it is likely that CB was planning to cancel the registrations from the start, but waited until the last minute to punish members of the test prep community and to minimize their ability to make alternate plans.
    edited March 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • intparentintparent 36291 replies644 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    They gave people the chance to contact them if they really need it for things like applying to colleges to see if they could be reinstated.
    · Reply · Share
  • jgoggsjgoggs 208 replies22 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I think you are very naive to believe that adult test takers are not involved in the cheating just because the incidents you have read about have not involved adult test takers.

    As I have already written on the previous page, @gettingschooled, I do not deny the possibility that adult test-takers may have been involved in cheating. Instead, I merely note their absence as factors in any of the major domestic or international cheating incidents of the last few years and therefore conclude that the current focus on them is a red herring. If you have any evidence to the contrary, I would be happy to hear of it, but until then, I am not "naive" for declining to believe what you cannot prove.



    · Reply · Share
  • jgoggsjgoggs 208 replies22 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @Plotinus -- Adults who had registered for the March test had their registrations summarily transferred to the May date. (Those who had already registered for May had their registrations transferred to the nearest test date for which they had not already registered.) It appears that test-takers who do not want to accept these unilateral transfers can also simply request a cancellation and a return of their test fee.
    · Reply · Share
  • momof2kymomof2ky 436 replies45 threadsRegistered User Member
    I am so tired of the Collegeboard's screw ups. In recent months, there was the fiasco with the JUNE SAT when two sections were not scored because of printing errors. Next, the inflated percentiles on the most recent PSAT. Then the recent revelation that there WILL be some experimental questions on this new SAT, but Collegeboard refuses to elaborate. And now this. Oh, and in my opinion the worst thing, the refusal of Collegeboard to stop re-using recycled tests for International students, for Sunday test takers, for in school testing, and for Make Up test dates. Thank goodness I am no longer tutoring the SAT and have advised all students to take the ACT only. Everyone in my area ( including school college cousenlors) is telling students the same thing.
    · Reply · Share
  • YnotgoYnotgo 3878 replies58 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @momof2ky You forgot the delays in sending scores to colleges this past fall. Not just new scores, old scores and subject test scores also.
    · Reply · Share
  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 3955 replies55 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My theory is that they are trying to silence the critics by not allowing pros (who can see through the tests better than students) into the first sitting to avoid the bad press. They cannot afford more bad press, so they are trying to minimize that by keeping the adults out.
    · Reply · Share
  • PlotinusPlotinus 939 replies19 threadsRegistered User Member
    edited March 2016
    @suzyQ7 wrote:
    they are trying to silence the critics by not allowing pros

    Why did CB cancel adult registrations at the very last minute?

    (A) It wants to stop international pros from seeing the test that will be recycled abroad in the near future.
    (B) It wants to stop domestic pros from gathering information that might help them tutor more effectively, and so to re-widen the gap.
    (C) It It wants to stop pros from speaking out about the quality of the test, potentially leading to more bad press.
    (D) It wants to ________ test prep people in whatever way possible.
    (E) All of the above.

    Answer: E.
    Difficulty Level: 1.

    Many test prep people are highly qualified, skilled educators, unlike the president of College Board, who could not even get a job as a high school teacher. Sour grapes, David?




    edited March 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • Ksty1098Ksty1098 270 replies10 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Does anyone read the ToS anymore?

    "In the event of a test security-related concern , public health threat, natural disaster, or terrorist act, the College Board may cancel testing for all or a particular group of test-takers. When this occurs, the SAT Program will attempt to provide adequate prior notice, although circumstances may limit our ability to do so. Once determined, we will communicate test cancellations and where feasible, alternative test dates for affected test-takers."

    You agreed to the College Boards conditions, abide by them.
    · Reply · Share
  • ClaremontMomClaremontMom 2365 replies41 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Ksty1098 wrote:
    Does anyone read the ToS anymore?

    I doubt it....Who reads the ToS for every website they visit, software they download, or in this case purchase they make?

    But just because you don't read it, doesn't mean you can ignore it. (But wouldn't that be nice! ;) )
    · Reply · Share
  • GonshookimGonshookim 9 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Well that's pretty lame. And not entirely surprising.
    · Reply · Share
  • PlotinusPlotinus 939 replies19 threadsRegistered User Member
    @Hunt wrote:
    because of the risk of having to answer questions themselves about their business practices.

    Thank you for your professional opinion as a lawyer @Hunt. I was wondering about the comment quoted above. Do you mean to imply by the above comment that it is illegal or unethical for an adult tutor to sit for the SAT?

    If you do, could you explain this?

    Do you mean that just by the act of taking the test, an adult tutor is engaging in cheating? Or that if the adult tutor takes the test, he or she is going to engage in cheating after the test? So adult tutors who take the test do so with the aim of cheating?

    I know of at least one test prep company that requires a recent SAT score of its adult tutors as a minimum job qualification. Do you think this is illegal or unethical?

    Or were you referring to some other aspect of SAT tutoring that is illegal or unethical?

    If there were a lawsuit, I think there might be a lot of embarrassing College Board business practices that could come under the spotlight, such as where, when, and how often College Board has recycled and plans to recycle tests, and for what reasons.

    Another embarrassing question could be at what time College Board decided that there was a test security issue for the March and May tests that would require cancellation of all adult registrations. Was it really just two days ago? Or was College Board planning to cancel these for a long time? The registrations have been completed for quite a while. Adults have been allowed to sit the SAT for years. The clause you cite looks like an "emergency" provision. It says that CB is supposed to give the affected parties as much notice as possible. Is that really what happened, or was there a plan from the outset to cancel the registrations at the last minute, claiming that there was a test security "emergency", with the aim of causing as much damage to the adult tutor registrants as possible?

    · Reply · Share
  • PlotinusPlotinus 939 replies19 threadsRegistered User Member
    isn't going to happen

    If the test were much harder, it would not be so easy to coach. The right way to level the playing field is to write a serious test that separates people by merit. Banning tutors from the testing room is not going to do anything if the test is so dumbed-down.
    · Reply · Share
  • jgoggsjgoggs 208 replies22 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Does anyone read the ToS anymore?

    Does anyone read the thread anymore? Because this ...
    "In the event of a test security-related concern , public health threat, natural disaster, or terrorist act, the College Board may cancel testing for all or a particular group of test-takers. When this occurs, the SAT Program will attempt to provide adequate prior notice, although circumstances may limit our ability to do so. Once determined, we will communicate test cancellations and where feasible, alternative test dates for affected test-takers."

    You agreed to the College Boards conditions, abide by them.

    ... has been mentioned already, @Ksty1098.

    Since you've brought it up again, let me please ask you to clarify your point, because what you seem to be suggesting is this:

    As long as College Board's terms assert that College Board has the right to do something, people may not object or complain when it does that thing.

    But that principle doesn't really make any sense. Take a look around this thread for mentions of numerous recent College-Board-related problems: recycling of tests abroad, frequent cheating scandals, printing errors, test cancellations, test delays, score cancellations, score reporting delays, broken promises about providing practice tests, inaccurate information about experimental sections, and other things. My guess is that College Board's terms probably cover all of those problems. By your logic, that means that no one can complain about any of them. Is that really what you believe? If so, why should College Board work at improving any of these problems? Why not just amend its terms to say, "College Board reserves the right to do whatever it wants"?

    Perhaps more importantly, your post assumes precisely what this thread is debating--that is, whether there is indeed any real "security-related concern" here. I don't believe that there is, but even if we give College Board the benefit of the doubt, shouldn't the company be pressured into addressing security concerns in ways that do not involve short-notice cancellations--such as by checking IDs carefully, by effectively preventing the use of electronic devices during the test, and by discontinuing the practice of "recycling" tests? How exactly are interested parties--whether students, parents, or teachers--supposed to pressure College Board to take those steps if they follow your principle and simply accept circumstances without complaint?

    · Reply · Share
  • 2018eastorwest2018eastorwest 301 replies32 threadsRegistered User Member
    edited March 2016
    You can object and complain all you want. But if it is in the terms that you agreed to by registering, you might not get the sympathy that you are seeking.
    For anyone without a stake in this, the security risk of thousands of (out of country?) adult non-student test registrants is pretty obvious. You seem to be choosing not to see it.
    And yes, the CB could do other things to reduce the risk. But they don't have to. Just like you don't have to take the test.

    edited March 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • jgoggsjgoggs 208 replies22 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited March 2016
    Also, for the OP's benefit: at this point it would strengthen, not weaken, your argument to go ahead and admit that you are a tutor. It would make you appear less evasive.

    For a lawyer, @Hunt, you seem to have a tenuous grasp of rather elementary logic. Here are some terms you may wish to Google:

    ad hominem
    appeal to motive
    appeal to bias

    Let me quote a bit from just one poster, @thshadow:
    No offense to anyone who is a tutor (presumably you @jgoggs )
    @jgoggs - I assumed you're a tutor because - well, aren't you? I can't imagine anyone being upset that's not a tutor.

    And:
    I think that anything that makes tutors less effective is a *good* thing. Tutoring is just another way for wealthy people to have even more advantages.
    I have no problem with anything that the CB does to people that register for the test who aren't in that group. Why should I have any sympathy for people trying to take the SAT for their own personal gain?
    I am happy that the CB is legally able to cancel the registrations of professional test takers.

    Certain posters on this thread seem determined to "out" people as tutors and then use them as sounding boards for their rather tired complaints about tutoring. Does that offend me? No--but it doesn't much interest me either.

    These posts border on thread hijacking. I can't stop them (and I doubt I'd bother even if I could), but I'm not being "evasive" by declining to indulge them. Those who want to complain about how terribly shocking and unfair it is that practice and instruction can improve skill levels are, of course, free to find someone else to complain to.
    edited March 2016
    Post edited by fallenchemist on
    · Reply · Share
  • jgoggsjgoggs 208 replies22 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    For anyone without a stake in this, the security risk of thousands of (out of country?) adult non-student test registrants is pretty obvious. You seem to be choosing not to see it.

    @2018eastorwest, if it's "obvious," at least one person in the universe should be able to explain it. So far, that hasn't happened. (Nor has anyone explained why the risk became apparent only five days before the test date, when registration closed weeks ago.)
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity