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SAT concordance table - compare old and new SAT scores

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Replies to: SAT concordance table - compare old and new SAT scores

  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    edited May 2016
    The SSAT test (used for prepschool admission) is also reported on a crazy endpoint scale. Therefore, people just ignore the test score and use percentiles. With percentiles, you immediately know where you stand.

    Perhaps middle school kids applying for prepschool have less fragile self-esteem than HS students applying to college.



  • SkyepopSkyepop Registered User Posts: 29 New Member
    When will percentiles be released for the SAT? Will it be when the scores are released shortly (this month)?
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    edited May 2016
    From the CB's newly released tables:
     
    On the 1600 scale, here is the concordance between the New SAT vs. the Old SAT.  Note the scores I highlighted in red.   Look at how there is NOT a one-for-one correspondence between New and Old scores, because for the New 1600 score there are 3 different component sub-scores  (M+CR+W), while for the Old 1600 score it was just 2 different component sub-scores  (M+CR).  
     
    Does this make your head ache?  It sure makes mine ache…
     
     
    New | Old | difference
     1600 | 1600 | + 0
       1590  | 1580 | + 0
         
    1590  | 1590 | + 10
     1580 | 1570 | + 10
     1570 | 1560 | + 10
     1560 | 1540 | + 10
         
    1560  | 1550 | + 20
     1550 | 1530 | + 20
    1540  | 1510 | + 20
         
    1540  | 1520 | + 30
     1530 | 1500 | + 30
     1520 | 1490 | + 30
    1510  | 1470 | + 30
         
     1510  | 1480 | + 40
     1500 | 1460 | + 40
     1490 | 1450 | + 40
    1480  | 1430 | + 40
         
    1480  | 1440 | + 50
     1470 | 1420 | + 50
     1460 | 1410 | + 50
     1450 | 1400 | + 50
     1440 | 1390 | + 50
     1430 | 1380 | + 50
    1420  | 1360 | + 50
         
    1420  | 1370 | + 60
     1410 | 1350 | + 60
     1400 | 1340 | + 60
     1390 | 1330 | + 60
     1380 | 1320 | + 60
     1370 | 1310 | + 60
     1360 | 1300 | + 60
     1350 | 1290 | + 60
     1340 | 1280 | + 60
     1330 | 1270 | + 60
     1320 | 1260 | + 60
     1310  | 1240 | + 60
         
     1310  | 1250 | + 70
    1300 | 1230 | + 70
     1290 | 1220 | + 70
     1280 | 1210 | + 70
     1270 | 1200 | + 70
     1260 | 1190 | + 70
     1250 | 1180 | + 70
     1240 | 1170 | + 70
     1230 | 1160 | + 70
     1220 | 1150 | + 70
     1210 | 1140 | + 70
     1200 | 1130 | + 70
     1190 | 1120 | + 70
     1180 | 1110 | + 70
     1170 | 1100 | + 70
     1160 | 1090 | + 70
     1150 | 1080 | + 70
     1140 | 1070 | + 70
     1130  | 1050 | + 70
         
     1130  | 1060 | + 80
     1120 | 1040 | + 80
     1110 | 1030 | + 80
     1100 | 1020 | + 80
     1090 | 1010 | + 80
     1080 | 1000 | + 80
     1070 | 990 | + 80
     1060 | 980 | + 80
     1050 | 970 | + 80
     1040 | 960 | + 80
     1030 | 950 | + 80
     1020 | 940 | + 80
     1010 | 930 | + 80
     1000 | 920 | + 80
     990 | 910 | + 80
     980 | 900 | + 80
     970 | 890 | + 80
     960 | 880 | + 80
     950 | 870 | + 80
     940 | 860 | + 80
     930 | 850 | + 80
     920 | 840 | + 80
     910 | 830 | + 80
     900 | 820 | + 80
     890 | 810 | + 80
     880 | 800 | + 80
     870 | 790 | + 80
     860  | 770 | + 80
         
     860  | 780 | + 90
     850 | 760 | + 90
     840 | 750 | + 90
     830 | 740 | + 90
     820 | 730 | + 90
     810 | 720 | + 90
     800 | 710 | + 90
     790 | 700 | + 90
     780 | 690 | + 90
     770 | 680 | + 90
     760 | 670 | + 90
     750  | 650 | + 90
         
     750  | 660 | + 100
     740 | 640 | + 100
     730 | 630 | + 100
     720 | 620 | + 100
     710 | 610 | + 100
     700 | 600 | + 100
     
     
  • AgentninetynineAgentninetynine Registered User Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    It's certainly making my head spin. What is the benefit of inflating the score? This really messes up Naviance and other data sheets. On Spykid's PSAT (No SAT score yet) his reading/writing score was 99 percentile, yet it wasn't the top of the scale.
  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 Registered User Posts: 2,988 Senior Member
    Anyone know what the CB does not equate the CR score on the new SAT to the CR score on the ACT? They don't do the math either. Why not?
  • PlotinusPlotinus Registered User Posts: 892 Member
    I think it is clear what the motive is: inflating scores makes it easier for colleges to admit "special category" students without risking lawsuits.
    This is nothing new.
    Scores were similarly inflated in 1995 and again in 2006. Wake up people. Colleges are not interested in merit. They are interested in money and diversity politics.
  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,628 Senior Member
    Here is a link to score converters: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/scores/understanding-scores/sat-score-converter

    Confusing, eh? I sure wish I'd saved my old Dick Tracy Decoder Ring!

    The most important thing to know is that, typically, the new SAT scores are going to seem higher than the old test scores. So don't go dancing around the dining room just yet thinking that you're a shoo-in at Skidmore or Syracuse (or Stanford???). The published medians that you'll see on the College Board Web site (etc.) are based on the old results, which is why the conversion is imperative if you're trying to determine whether your scores on the March test will put you in the ballpark at your current target colleges.
  • BlueBlazerBlueBlazer Registered User Posts: 28 New Member
    @Sally_Rubenstone Do you think that the colleges will convert old scores to new scores in order to put everyone on the same playing field? Also, what about those schools that did not consider the writing score previously. My child has an old reading score just below the mid 50% for some universities, but a writing score above the mid 50% for most universities. When you convert, these two scores are combined. In this sense, do you think that those schools now have to consider the old writing score?
  • Sally_RubenstoneSally_Rubenstone CC Admissions Expert Posts: 3,628 Senior Member
    @BlueBlazer -
    Do you think that the colleges will convert old scores to new scores in order to put everyone on the same playing field?

    Some may do it the other way around ... converting new scores to old ones ... until they are familiar with the revised scale. But, in any case, apples will be compared with apples, and so students with the older, potentially lower scores will be at no disadvantage.

    Schools that used the old writing score will see if a student already submitted it and may use it again, but my best guess is that, if they didn't consider Writing in the past, they won't use the old scores now, even though Writing is combined in the new scores. And, in the past, even when colleges DID consider the Writing score, it was rarely given a lot of weight unless there was a red flag (e.g., the score was unusually high or unusually low).
  • MamelotMamelot Registered User Posts: 2,116 Senior Member
    <<Anyone know what the CB does not equate the CR score on the new SAT to the CR score on the ACT? They don't do the math either. Why not>>

    @suzyQ7 I was wondering the same thing. Prior to the revised ACT writing score in Sept 2015, the way that the old charts broke it all down was basically to convert SAT (CR+M) to ACT (C) and then SAT (W) to ACT (English/Writing). So it appears that the new SAT score converters are making it so that you can continue those exact comparisons.

    So right now, in order to convert new SAT (M) to ACT (M) you first need to convert New to Old SAT, then look up the percentile to which the old SAT Math score corresponds, and THEN find the ACT Math score pertaining to that percentile. It's crazy. Hopefully someone will point out a much simpler method. In any case, it would be great to get current, detailed subscore conversions in the near future but I suspect they'll get around to that right after providing the finalized PSAT Concordance Tables that they promised us. :))
  • candjsdadcandjsdad Registered User Posts: 210 Junior Member
    I'm willing to the College Board a little leeway here. The SAT scores were originally conceived back when they were basically assuming they were designing an easily administered IQ test. In order to do that you need long "tails" in the distribution curve so you can accurately identify people who score two and three standard deviations away from the norm. For many reasons that idea is no longer in vogue. For one, the SAT never identified that far end of the curve terribly accurately and even to the extent it did, top schools haven't found that information all that helpful. In each subject the top 5-6 slots (750-800) have been populated by the top 1% of students. That's at least twice the granularity that is needed by most schools. On the ACT the top 1% populate just three slots, 34-36.

    So, I think what the College Board is doing is intentionally flattening out their curve. There are only 10-20 schools in the country who really care about identifying the top 1%. There are a lot more who care about having more accurate and granular information for students on down the list, particularly the top 40% of students. My guess is that schools have realized that there is more differentiation in that range of students than had been assumed previously.
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