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SAT/ACT accommodations-disclosure to schools

CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,450 Senior Member
If you take either test and you get approved for extra time, are colleges informed that you got extra time?
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Replies to: SAT/ACT accommodations-disclosure to schools

  • Clementine7624Clementine7624 Registered User Posts: 63 Junior Member
    @Center. Definitely not.
  • itsintheprocessitsintheprocess Registered User Posts: 164 Junior Member
    Even if they are informed (which according to #1 they are not.) They aren't allowed to hold it against in anyway as you were approved by the CB to have extra time
  • CA1543CA1543 Registered User Posts: 1,563 Senior Member
  • Emsmom1Emsmom1 Registered User Posts: 750 Member
    Nothing is reported to the schools in terms of accommodations-colleges have no way of knowing whether or not you received extra time, at least for undergrad (I think medical schools do know if you received extra time on the MCAT, though).
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,450 Senior Member
    Interesting: Given the huge numbers of kids getting accommodations (many are questionnable) it seems somewhat unfair that schools don't know. I'm not saying it should be held against you but if you are applying to competitive schools you would think it would matter. Your score really doesnt equate to someone's who had to take the same test with less time. Makes me think that kids who take the test without an accommodation might disclose that they had no accommodation.
  • annamomannamom Registered User Posts: 915 Member
    Interesting: Given the huge numbers of kids getting accommodations (many are questionnable) it seems somewhat unfair that schools don't know. I'm not saying it should be held against you but if you are applying to competitive schools you would think it would matter. Your score really doesnt equate to someone's who had to take the same test with less time. Makes me think that kids who take the test without an accommodation might disclose that they had no accommodation.

    you certainly can choose to this...
  • Emsmom1Emsmom1 Registered User Posts: 750 Member
    @Center If you (or your child) had severe ADHD or a processing disorder you might think differently. As someone who has worked extensively with children with ADHD, I came across many kids with very high IQs who had difficulties with timed tests due to their disability.
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,450 Senior Member
    @equationlover you are clearly why accommodations exist and I have no issue with that. I am VERY familiar with 504s and IEPS. I also know first hand that hyper competitive parents are getting their top performing kids accommodations to get extra time on test for visual processing disorders which clearly didnt affect their admittance to andover etc but is serious enough to cause headaches after intensive reading...........inconceivable
  • trish02trish02 Registered User Posts: 160 Junior Member
    @Center - I mean no disrespect, but I'm not sure you are aware of the process to get an accommodation for either the SAT or ACT. Some people assume it is automatically given to students with an IEP or 504 Plan. However, that is not the case. The College Board requires additional cognitive testing, done by a licensed educational psychologist, and determines if accommodations are applicable based on the test results, student's current school accommodations, and results between timed and untimed tests. The student's school counselor, teachers, and SSD coordinator are all involved in the process of evaluation. The College Board has very strict guidelines and requirements for approval of accommodations. I don't believe they give out approvals lightly. The College Board has lots of information on their website if you want more information: https://www.collegeboard.org/students-with-disabilities/documentation-guidelines/disability-documentation

    To all with accommodations, just a reminder that even if approved for accommodations on the SAT and/or ACT, you will need to notify your college if you request services in college.
  • LindagafLindagaf Registered User Posts: 6,918 Senior Member
    edited August 13
    @Center , I see comments like yours fairly often. My son has extended time on all standardized tests. He is dyslexic and dysgraphic. Extended time just helps to put kids with various disabilities on a more even footing. Personally, I don't think it's fair that we were all taught in the same way to read and write, when for some people, learning to read and write is much more diffcult. It would be better if we all did our reading and writing in Chinese, because apparently dyslexia doesn't exist in that language. It's also not fair that it takes my son much longer to read things. I think everyone else should be forced to read more slowly so that they can be at his level. When my son was first tested, he scored in the 3rd percentile for spelling. I think the 97 percent of people who can spell better than him should be forced to have all reading materials printed with all the letters jumbled up so that they can be at his level. That would be fair. Actually, these days his spelling is in the 26th percentile, so maybe not every word needs to be jumbled. 74 percent jumbled words would be okay. Then it would be fair for everyone. I hope you don't have an issue with my perspective.
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,450 Senior Member
    @Lindagaf I think that the point is that if kids get better scores than they otherwise would and get into better schools (more rigorous) than they might otherwise then how is that fair to anyone? Maybe everyone should get 5 hours to allow for the worst sorts of disabilities. CLEARLY there are many many legitimate accommodations made. It is however abundantly clear that if you pay the right psychologist you can get a diagnosis that will enable someone to get an accommodation thereby giving straight A students an extra edge. I have been told it is very easy to do and many consultants advise on this as well.
  • LindagafLindagaf Registered User Posts: 6,918 Senior Member
    Your point is nothing new. People with money pay for many advantages. I can't imagine there are so many people with that kind of money who can pay for made-up learning disabilities. You are talking about probably a very small number of students. No doubt if they are paying for that, they are paying for many other advantages too. At the end of the day, if they have that much money, they might get in regardless, or if they don't have good qualifications otherwise, and aren't development cases, their money won't get them in.
  • iangrodmaniangrodman Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    The famous "I've been told" or "I've heard." Its a shame that there are people who believe licensed professionals would put those licenses in jeopardy to help students through the "simple" process of getting accommodations on standardized exams. Thankfully, we live in a world now where most appreciate that those who suffer with conditions like dyslexia and ADHD cab be just as intelligent as those who don't.
  • CenterCenter Registered User Posts: 1,450 Senior Member
    There are many articles published on this phenomenon. No one said that those with conditions like dyslexia or ADHD arent intelligent.
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