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Freshman ACT Score- What Next?

gabrieljkfgabrieljkf Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
Hello, I'm a 9th grader and scored a 30 ACT Score (32 English, 29 Math, 30 Reading and 28 Science) on the A11 form this June. I had 2 months of practice and took 8 practice tests, ranging from 26-31 Composite. Should I take the ACT again this September or wait until next year? What ACT score should be my goal?

Replies to: Freshman ACT Score- What Next?

  • gurt567gurt567 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    A freshman scoring a 30 is really good!
    Your math should improve as you engage in higher level courses. What are you in right now? Up to precalc is tested on the ACT I believe.
    Science is something that you can master with just more practice. It's all about gaining speed while retaining accuracy. A tip from me is to go directly to the questions. Reading is also similar to Science in my opinion. I recommend that you read some good classical books and practice going through them quickly while not compromising comprehension. That'll help you significantly.

    Your best score should be your Junior year summer.
  • gabrieljkfgabrieljkf Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
    Thanks!

    Eh, I'm "in Calc", but I didn't have really good Algebra, Geometry and Trig courses. I'm trying to compensate for that by studying over the summer. For some reason I can get B+ and As in Calc though. Worried that the course may be too easy. I did worse on the ACT math section this time because I got stuck on stupid problems that were really time consuming, rather than moving on. I was hoping for a 30 math.

    Thanks for the advice! In my practice, I went from a 22 Science to a 28, after I took some advice from books, so I know the value of advice and appreciate it a lot! My biggest problem is making stupid mistakes in all sections, specifically the math and English.

    I read for hours a day, and I like philosophy and economic books, so it should be easy for me to incorporate classics into my study!

    Do you think I should take it again in September, or wait until June 2019?
  • scubadivescubadive Registered User Posts: 786 Member
    edited June 19
    In the fall I would try an SAT, to compare which test is better for you. Then I would give it a rest and try either the SAT or ACT depending on which test you prefer at the end of sophmore year or beginning of junior year.
  • MusakParentMusakParent Registered User Posts: 459 Member
    Why would you take it again now? I can tell you my kid's composite went up 7 points between freshman and junior year (just got the junior score) and could have gone up one more point on a better day. You're in good shape. Trying the SAT is not a bad idea. Reading, writing, and keeping some math review going is really your best prep at this point. If you find one of those all math prep books, do like 5 problems a day and when you get them wrong, dig in and review and find out why. Practice those concepts if they're rusty. My kid did math early too and we ended up spinning wheels keeping the review going but it was worth it.
  • coltonpayneCCcoltonpayneCC Registered User Posts: 9 New Member
    Congrats on getting a 30 as a freshman! Focus on taking courses that challenge you and spend the next few years figuring out what subjects you are most interested in. I would recommend focusing on studying for the PSAT sophomore year. It is an extremely important test because it determines if you qualify as a national merit scholar. This would provide you with a ton of scholarship money and looks excellent on college applications.
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