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Taking A Deep Dive Into the College Board’s New Adversity Score

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Replies to: Taking A Deep Dive Into the College Board’s New Adversity Score

  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 5898 replies29 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,927 Senior Member
    @collegemom9 Some states use the ACT as a high school graduation test. Because it's state mandated, all juniors are required to take it. As such, most students in those states end up only taking the ACT and not the SAT.
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  • parentologistparentologist 153 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 163 Junior Member
    My kid's high school draws on diverse areas. So if I rent a tiny apartment in the "projects" area, and use it as our legal address, will it increase my kid's diversity score?
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  • milgymfammilgymfam 642 replies11 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 653 Member
    The ACT seems to be testing the waters on people’s opinions about this. D took the ACT today and the survey that was emailed a few hours later asked a number of questions about adversity scores.
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  • EllieMomEllieMom 1870 replies11 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,881 Senior Member
    edited June 8
    @parentologist You don't even need to do that if your census tract is also diverse. The school scores are based on school data and the neighborhood scores use aggregates of census tract data within the school boundaries. According to CollegeBoard, "All students living in the same census tract will have the same neighborhood data and all students attending the same high school will have the same high school data."

    It's a seriously flawed measure.
    edited June 8
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  • OhiBroOhiBro 308 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 314 Member
    edited June 8
    Still no info on how the score is calculated. Weighting of factors is totally arbitrary, as there is no unified definition of adversity to target. Validation of a model is impossible.

    One of countless omissions in such a score: adopted / foster children.

    Also, completely unethical for a student to be judged by a score that he/she cannot access.
    edited June 8
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  • agreatstoryagreatstory 45 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 46 Junior Member
    To appreciate why this is necessary you need to know what it means to grow up in a ghetto.
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5339 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,349 Senior Member
    While everyone is calling it an adversity score, it's actually environmental context data. It does not eliminate or replace personal data. If you look at what is provided to the college (which you can), it shows data on the school like average AP score, how a student 's score compares to others in their school, etc. Remember that most colleges, in setting up their admissions offices geographically, have been trying to compile a version of this material themselves. If your school gets visits from college reps, odds are that they have put together some version of this already.

    If a kid is coming from a school where his 1250 SAT is exceptional, that's noteworthy but might not have been noted. For everyone who is at a school that draws from a diverse SES background and has good stats, you are already probably a school that AOs like - strong academic prep as well as ability to thrive outside your bubble.

    It's interesting that everyone is convinced this will work against them. To me, the reaction speaks more to the anxiety that is college admissions than to anything else.
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  • comptechmomcomptechmom 122 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 124 Junior Member
    @EllieMom Completely Agree. Our City has our Magnet schools in the worst parts of town. It's open to all students in the surrounding area as a regular school but has a Magnet program for those who wish to do the 1.x hour commute for those living on the other side of the city. The area around it has elementary and middle schools with 85% Hispanic and 85% Early Language Learners and could be as high as 90% Economically Disadvantaged. Imagine the Adversity score for those students just from the surrounding 'environment'.

    Our City is Property Wealthy. Housing prices are high everywhere. However, a HS could be Title 1 (This means at least 40% of your students are Low Income) or not. Students are bussed from multiple zip codes. Everyone is free to Transfer to any HS in our City District. Our District tries to equalize college admissions by weighting a Pre-AP class no different than an AP class giving 'all' students the chance for a higher ranking. In our case - it seems like our District is doing it's best to equalize and there is a current battle going on to equalize 'more' bussing from those more disadvantaged areas to the more advantaged areas. Adding CollegeBoard Adversity into this mix is going to really upset this well-built balance.

    I'm thankful I have no more skin in this game.
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  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger 2645 replies137 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,782 Senior Member
    edited June 9
    @gardenstategal If you look at what is provided to the college (which you can), it shows data on the school like average AP score, how a student 's score compares to others in their school, etc.

    If colleges want to know how a student compares to others at their school, there is a very simple, direct method of measuring that: it's called class rank. If elite colleges care about how students compare to their classmates, they can announce they will no longer accept applications from schools that don't provide class ranking.
    edited June 9
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  • EconPopEconPop 37 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 39 Junior Member
    @gardenstategal , you made some very good points.
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  • diegodavisdiegodavis 4 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5 New Member
    I'm a bad example for this scoring. The SAT asks for the home address where I receive mail. They are very specific about it being "where you receive mail". Our family has mail delivered to a service which removes junk mail and scans/emails pictures of all other mail. We can then pickup the mail we want or pay extra to have it forwarded to our current location. This is a benefit my work has provided for 10 years now because I work on-location much of the year. So I'm not sure what my son entered when registering for the SAT.
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5339 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,349 Senior Member
    @roethlisburger , only kinda. Class rank measures how well a kid did in classes graded in a way that we don't know and is based on weighting we may not understand. It may be valuable in one regard. If a kid got an A+ in a class and a 3 on the AP exam, there are a lot of conclusions you can draw (and most, imo, are not so favorable to that student.) But if you see that the school's average AP score is 1.2, you might see that differently. How that SAT or AP score compares to others measures something else.

    Kids at selective high schools may get into great colleges being at the 50% mark for their class. Why do colleges accept those kids? Because they understand the context of their grades and academic environment. At many lower performing schools, the colleges don't know the context. I don't think that providing that is a problem. A college may still decide that a kid, regardless of potential, is inadequately prepared for their environment. It isn't a score adjustment. It's an additional profile not prepared by the school and prepared in a way that is consistent across schools.



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  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger 2645 replies137 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,782 Senior Member
    edited June 9
    @gardenstategal
    Kids at selective high schools may get into great colleges being at the 50% mark for their class. Why do colleges accept those kids?
    I would say it's primarily because private colleges want lots of rich, full pay and legacy kids. It's even better if they are a great lax player or have a famous parent.
    edited June 9
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5339 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,349 Senior Member
    I can see why you might think that, but at most top prep schools, at least half the kids are getting FA. And looking at college acceptances and matriculation at several that I am familiar with, ability to pay isn't the driver.
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