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Taking A Deep Dive Into the College Board’s New Adversity Score

CCEdit_TorreyCCEdit_Torrey 26 replies202 discussionsEditor Posts: 228 Editor
College Confidential examines the Adversity Scores that will be launching on SAT Score Reports, and sat down with an official at a school that is already utilizing them: https://www.collegeconfidential.com/articles/taking-a-deep-dive-into-the-college-boards-new-adversity-score/
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Replies to: Taking A Deep Dive Into the College Board’s New Adversity Score

  • nypapanypapa 125 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
    How is this different from redlining? Instead of denying credit or housing by zip-code, this is drawing neighborhood maps as a factor for college admission decisions. As the article reads the students cannot escape from being profiled even without having taken the SAT, as the data is just based on the students home and high school addresses.

    I am more concerned about the public colleges implementing this for automatic processing and screening out large amount of applicants than privates that are suppose to evaluate applications more individually. Basically this means in the future in order to get accepted to the public flagship, qualify for a merit tuition discount or get into the honors program the student not only needs qualifying test scores and GPA but also have the right combination of high school and home address.
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  • RW1RW1 180 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 186 Junior Member
    Hopefully, I'm missing something but as I see it there will eventually only be three options for excellent non disadvantaged students.
    1. Move to ACT state and avoid SAT completely until ACT changes.
    2. Go to poor school with IB program embedded and maybe buy rental in poor area and call home.
    3. Get great education at great high school and live in great area then go a University that is significantly below what your prepared for.
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  • bgbg4usbgbg4us 1174 replies35 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,209 Senior Member
    I'm all for getting kids out of poverty through education. I'd love for the low SES kids to have a boost, encouragement, examples, and help to end their cyclical poverty situations potentially through a college education.

    my kids' HS is 60%+ low SES. We are also an ACT state; very few take the SAT at this school; ACT is mandated by the state junior year. So, this doesn't help our HS kids much at all.

    Our city, although in the midwest, is one of the top 10 cities in the nation for poverty in minority/urban cultures. We have no middle class minority presence in our city; it's an issue our chamber of commerce deals with daily.

    The 90%+ low SES and urban and minority schools don't have tons of kids taking the SAT test; they are just focused on getting the kids to read/write/speak English and graduated, and potentially looking at some post-high school training. I just wish there was something to help those kids; although I like the intentions of the College Board; I feel like this is a teaser and doesn't address any of the real problems; not that that's College Board's job. Who does this policy actually help??
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  • nypapanypapa 125 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
    @RW1 and @bgb4us : according to the article it does not matter if the student takes the SAT. Colleges that subscribe to the adversity data feed will get a computed adversity score for applicants no matter what test, SAT or ACT, was taken.
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  • RW1RW1 180 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 186 Junior Member
    Only if you use the College board. If you avoid it completely and strictly use ACT (CEO says not going to have adversity score) then impossible for Universities to get that data. Of course, you would need to be in state thats not linked to College Board.
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  • RW1RW1 180 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 186 Junior Member
    Of course, that also means avoiding PSAT and AP tests (As mentioned in post above: follow IB path instead.)
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  • vpa2019vpa2019 497 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 507 Member
    Just another cog in the screwed up American higher education machinery. Glad I’m finished with it but I do pity those yet to navigate it. Maybe there will be a nationwide boycott of standardized testing. Schools need students to pay the bills. Wonder how that would shake out? I for one wouldn’t miss anything about the college board, APs, SATs etc...just a huge drain sucking the money out of frantic over stressed students and their families.
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  • nypapanypapa 125 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
    I suppose it should be possible to use a freedom of information inquiry to public state college systems to get information what colleges get the score and how it is used. As an individual applicant I would also find it disturbing to have my score hidden from me. The situation seems very similar to credit agency scoring where as consumer one has a right to access your individual score.
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  • EconPopEconPop 37 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 39 Junior Member
    edited June 8
    I say, go back to drawing board on this one.
    I agree it is not a very efficient solution.

    The problem is, when some factions are working hard to completely dismantle and eliminate AA; when many well-intentioned institutions (universities, CollegeBoard, etc) realize AA is still required to help equalize opportunity; when those institutions can anticipate the near future where repeated legal attacks on higher education AA will result in an end to AA in higher education admissions; wise well-intentioned people are left with two options.

    1) They can throw their hands up and eliminate altogether any AA in the admissions process of high education, thus eliminating the best, most efficacious option for equality in higher education.

    2) They can resort to what they know is an inferior option, but one that they anticipate can survive during the next few years of legal wrangling.

    It's comparable to triage. Often, the best option is not an option that can be utilized under the circumstances, so less effective, but still somewhat effective options are implemented.

    Quitting is the worst possible option. "Adversity Scoring" is definitely flawed, but for now, is the better of two bad options.

    edited June 8
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  • scholarmescholarme 2672 replies79 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,751 Senior Member
    I think one of the main things that bother me about the Adversity Score is the wasy it uses something beyond the student's control as a score to calcur "merit."
    Might as well include DNA testing - who knows, maybe it will in the future.
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 5898 replies29 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,927 Senior Member
    Same situation here as @EllieMom - Our D went to a very diverse private HS that was part of an inner city voucher program. Way, way more diversity than our public HS and many, many students on scholarship. Coupled with our residence being in a rural area, I would expect an adversity score that would have zero real world application for our family. We also told her to omit any unnecessary demographic information when filling out the forms for texts so no income reported to offset that. (I fundamentally hate the data grab and we do our best to avoid giving out unnecessary information).
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  • got2laughgot2laugh 36 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 37 Junior Member
    Adversity score? The college admissions = the Black Hole of the Universe. Public Universities (same with private) already know where students are coming from based on the reputation of public school location and probably demographics. Same with Private High Schools. This BS is just adding more fuel to the fire by providing a "score" which not even the students have a chance to see. Ridiculous and perhaps even discriminatory at all levels. Just glad "my process" will be done next year. I got a rising senior and it will be what it will be. I am more concerned about affordability and making sure we can find the right fit for him. He still fuming by the number of accommodations lots of "normal kids are getting for the purpose of taking these test.
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  • collegemom9collegemom9 704 replies22 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 726 Member
    @RW1 what is an ACT state? All states offer both tests and all schools take both.
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  • compmomcompmom 10580 replies76 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 10,656 Senior Member
    I agree with @EllieMom. Also it misses all kinds of OTHER obstacles like chronic medical conditions, loss of a parent, and so on.
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