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List of Average SAT Scores at 50 Colleges and Universities

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Replies to: List of Average SAT Scores at 50 Colleges and Universities

  • HepstarHepstar Registered User Posts: 1,586 Senior Member
    I have noticd that people have said that the Johns Hopkins SAT range is wrong. I tend to trust the CB more than the school's website stats because the school probably inflates its numbers to make it seem a bit better than it might be.

    Take NYU for example:

    CB: 1210 - 1410
    NYU Website: 1310 - 1440
    AOL: 1331 average
    Princeton Review: 1306 average

    As you can see, the numbers from NYU's website conflict with the numbers given by 3 other sources. The college board numbers are the most objective IMO, so I used them.

    I don't see how I got a scholarship to NYU with a 1350 SAT if that's only in the 40% for the school, as it would be according to NYU's SAT range.
  • jonw222jonw222 Registered User Posts: 79 Junior Member
    To speak for NYU specifically:

    At NYU, scholarships are based on financial aid as well as academic performance in high school (Check NYU's website for confirmation on this fact.) Some people with better numbers that others end up getting lower financial aid because their Fafsa numbers are different. However, there are merit based scholarships though (If you're wondering, PM me with the name and I'll tell you what kind it is.)

    Check the NYU website to see which school NYU is referring to. The NYU website range seems appropriate for the College of Arts and Sciences, in which the SAT scores are normally higher than for other schools at the college that rely more on auditions and portfolios to make their decisions (i.e. Tisch School of the Arts). Contrastingly, a school like the Stern school of Business has high SAT scores than the College of Arts and Sciences.

    Also, keep in mind that NYU (and all other schools for that matter) tend to accept people based on factors that are not necessarily based on applications. According to a statement by the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences: "NYU receives so many applications that they don't just accept people who can do the work." In other words, they do not do their acceptances solely based on SAT scores and base it on any number of factors including extra curriculars, and location (you have a much better shot of getting into NYU from outside the New York Metro Area.)
  • CoolaTroopaCoolaTroopa . Posts: 1,170 Senior Member
    Here is what Duke has on its website (keeping in mind that these are the average SAT scores of all students accepted not those who ultimately enroll.)

    Also to let you know, I think at this point Duke only considers Writing to be like an SAT II.

    Duke University
    Arts and Sciences-2180 (M+V+W), 1465 (M+V)
    Engineering-2225 (M+V+W), 1505 (M+V)

    As for ACT scores
    32 for Trinity and 33 for Pratt

    EDIT
    I found the 25/75th percentile scors elsewhere on their site for all admitted students to Duke and assuming a normal distribution, I have the following estimates.

    Critical Reading: 730
    Math: 745
    Writing: 725

    Composite (M+V): 1475
    Composite (M+V+W) 2200
  • gabriellaahgabriellaah - Posts: 350 Member
    Ridiculous. Colleges do not intentionally mislead on their websites. Before applying, one should always check with the college or university concerning its stats. After all, they are the final arbiters of whom they accept or reject. Other sources are secondary, getting their info from, where do you think? The colleges or universities. It is just that these secondary sources sometimes make errors, or that the info is outdated. For example, when a student is graduating in 2007, and he/she relies on, let's say, U.S. News and World Report Data for ranking info, that student needs to be aware that the info reflects what the numbers were for the kids who graduated and entered in 2005. Optimally, a student would want the most updated info, which, in this case, would have been the 2006 info. To get the most updated info about stats, therefore, the student should check out the most recent stats on the college's website, or call the admissions office for those numbers. If you are uncertain about whom to believe, a simple call to the admissions office would clear up any question.
  • gabriellaahgabriellaah - Posts: 350 Member
    Also, the information that I provided concerning Hopkins is correct. Not only did I check the stats for 2006 on their websites..."undergraduate admissions"/"fast facts," but I also called the admissions office and asked, without making reference to the info on their website.
  • HepstarHepstar Registered User Posts: 1,586 Senior Member
    "At NYU, scholarships are based on financial aid as well as academic performance in high school (Check NYU's website for confirmation on this fact.) Some people with better numbers that others end up getting lower financial aid because their Fafsa numbers are different. However, there are merit based scholarships though (If you're wondering, PM me with the name and I'll tell you what kind it is.)"

    I didn't fill out a FAFSA. My scholarship award was largely based on academics and service. Despite my good service record, there is no way that I would have gotten a 20K per year scholarship to NYU w/a 1350 SAT if the SAT range is 1310 - 1440. I'm not a URM or legacy either and I live in NYC. I had no "hooks" going for me.

    "Check the NYU website to see which school NYU is referring to. The NYU website range seems appropriate for the College of Arts and Sciences, in which the SAT scores are normally higher than for other schools at the college that rely more on auditions and portfolios to make their decisions (i.e. Tisch School of the Arts). Contrastingly, a school like the Stern school of Business has high SAT scores than the College of Arts and Sciences."

    The 1310 - 1440 range is for the entire class of 2010, not for a specific school.

    "Ridiculous. Colleges do not intentionally mislead on their websites."

    IMO, many college websites are pretty bad. Most of them try and show what a great school Blankity Blank University is without answering a lot of your questions. Also, when a college gives its SAT range on its website, the college makes it hard for you to know

    "Optimally, a student would want the most updated info, which, in this case, would have been the 2006 info."

    The CB numbers were recently updated with Writing Scores, so it must have compiled the most recent SAT data. The scores at many colleges actually dropped a bit since the new SAT was a bit harder. NYU went from 1240-1420 to 1210-1410. These numbers are the numbers for the first year students, NOT accepted students. The Johns Hopkins numbers you provided may have been for accepted students, which are usually higher since many of the stronger accepted applicants might choose to go to schools like HYPS.
  • gabriellaahgabriellaah - Posts: 350 Member
    It really is not my mission to convince you to go to the primary source for your info. But for all of you others, who want the correct info, go directly to the admissions pages on the various websites, or better yet, call the admissions offices for the most updated scores. The College Board, and other secondary sources, are not always accurate. One should not make a decision whether or not to apply to a school based on any facts and figures other than those that come directly from admissions offices. Putting full faith in these types of sources would be akin to believing everything you read in a history book, or newspaper. This is exactly why highschools now encourage analyzing historical events by using original documents. Don't make one of the most important decisions of your lives without going to the original source...the college or university of choice. And, if you are not going to believe what the college admissions office has to say, why apply there, anyway? You should have faith in your potential institution of higher learning.
  • gabriellaahgabriellaah - Posts: 350 Member
    Also, if you are looking to be accepted to a particular college or university, the numbers you would be interested in are those that reflect the scores of the admitted students. Right? If you are not sure of this answer, check it out with your high school guidance counselor.
  • HepstarHepstar Registered User Posts: 1,586 Senior Member
    "Also, if you are looking to be accepted to a particular college or university, the numbers you would be interested in are those that reflect the scores of the admitted students. Right?"

    Not necessairly. Some students would rather know the numbers for students in the school, not students who were accepted because many accepted students choose to attend different colleges. Believe it or not, not everyone who gets into Harvard goes there. The same is true of Johns Hopkins and every other college or university.
  • gabriellaahgabriellaah - Posts: 350 Member
    The point is, that for a student who is applying, what he/she is interested in is if his/her scores fall within the admissible range. I do agree with you that many students choose schools other than the Ivies. My son is one of those. However, a student who is applying does need to know the score ranges of those students who were admitted. Naturally the students who attend will, by and large, have fallen within those ranges, although 25% fall above the mid ranges, and 25% fall below. Anyway, much good luck with your choices.
  • quark49quark49 Registered User Posts: 160 Junior Member
    I'm above average at all those schools. :)

    It'd be so nice for me if SATs were everything, like some people think. OY!
  • a778999a778999 Registered User Posts: 1,520 Senior Member
    Hepstar, how did you do this? Taking the mean of the quartiles of each subject and adding them up?
  • jags861jags861 Registered User Posts: 1,716 Senior Member
    the reason all these "averages" are different/wrong is because you don't just take the 25/75, add them, and divide by 2. the true average would be everyone's sat score added and divided by no. of people. I'd be willing to be that schools where the upper end of the SAT is near the max (like Stanford and Duke) have lower average SAT scores the the reported. They have a lot of recruited athletes whos severely under average SAT scores would bring the average down.
  • Ashraf EassaAshraf Eassa Registered User Posts: 1,432 Senior Member
    Basically those averages say that I suck. Woohoo!
  • HepstarHepstar Registered User Posts: 1,586 Senior Member
    "the reason all these "averages" are different/wrong is because you don't just take the 25/75, add them, and divide by 2. the true average would be everyone's sat score added and divided by no. of people. I'd be willing to be that schools where the upper end of the SAT is near the max (like Stanford and Duke) have lower average SAT scores the the reported. They have a lot of recruited athletes whos severely under average SAT scores would bring the average down."

    Okay, if I'm so wrong, why don't you go ask all the students at all of the schools listed what he/she got on the SAT and average it out to get the "true average?" If you're lucky, you might finsh it before you're 100 years old. Seriously though, these averages may not be perfect, but they give you an idea. Take Harvard for example. The college board average is 2225, which may not be exact, but I'm sure it's a pretty good estimate.
This discussion has been closed.