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Silverturtle's Guide to SAT and Admissions Success

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Replies to: Silverturtle's Guide to SAT and Admissions Success

  • silverturtlesilverturtle Registered User Posts: 12,496 Senior Member
    Clearly no proof either way.

    Yes, which is why I am hesitant to diverge from the safer route of advising those in need of financial aid that is not explicitly assured by the school (as in the $60,0000-threshold at many top schools) against applying ED.
  • kunalkunal2kunalkunal2 Registered User Posts: 135 Junior Member
    I joined this site just to say that your guide is very helpful, and I appreciate your contributions.
    But, I do I have some questions.
    I am an Asian, but a first generation student. Will this "hook" help me even though I'm Asian, and if so, how?
    Your guide also said that chances of being accepted to a top college are greatly reduced if no one has been to that school. I go to a christian school with a small high school of 200 students. None of our students go to Ivy league school, we've only had one go to Cornell which was 5 years ago. Now, what should I do? I'm currently a rising junior and it's to late to transfer. Should I transfer to another school for my senior year?

    Thanks in advance
    -Kunal
  • xiggixiggi Registered User Posts: 25,441 Senior Member
    Re #78 and #80, there's no contradiction. The student tells Columbia that the offer cannot be accepted due to financial reasons, and Columbia releases the student. That is how it works, no "petition" is necessary.

    We should publicize this anomaly of having to "fight" to be released; which school was it? Applicants should know which schools are not following the rules. There's no reason to scare off students who need financial aid from applying ED to their dream schools that follow the rules.

    After dozens of threads and thousands of posts on this issue, it is obvious that the divide still exist. Some seem to believe that the language printed on the Common Application amounts to the final word on the issue. Others believe that this is NOT TRUE, and that the DECISION to release a student is still in the hands of the ED school, if the student ACCEPTED the offer. It is interesting to note that Columbia, according to the positions of some, would HAVE to issue a release based on a simple "notification." This is rather surprising as Columbia was one of the few schools that made their position ... public by posting the ED release rules on their site. They also added language that they would release a student to attend lower ranked schools. It is possible that they had a change of heart and that they did publish new language since the past discussions on CC, but that used the be the case in the past.

    No matter how one slices it, there are POSSIBLE penalties from playing fast and loose with the ED rules. While it is obvious that no school would ever force a student to attend a school he cannot afford, they surely can make attending a different school in the same admission cycle very hard or impossible.

    And this does not even address the issue of integrity and honor when signing a binding application. This does not mean that one should not apply and use his or right to REJECT the offer of admission. The rules, however, do not account for accepting an ED application and not withdrawing all other applications. Again, some people do not see that as a lack of integrity, but to each its own!

    PS By the way, it would extremely unfortunate to see this guide marred by discussions about nebulous elements such as the need of obtaining a release from a ED contract. All discussions in this forum should remain related to the SAT preparation.
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Registered User Posts: 12,496 Senior Member
    I am an Asian, but a first generation student. Will this "hook" help me even though I'm Asian, and if so, how?

    Being a first-generation college student generally affords a modest but meaningful advantage. Being Asian does not change that.
    Your guide also said that chances of being accepted to a top college are greatly reduced if no one has been to that school. I go to a small christian school with a small high school of 200 students. None of our students go to Ivy league school, we've only had one go to Cornell which was 5 years ago. Now, what should I do? I'm currently a rising junior and it's to late to transfer. Should I transfer to another school for my senior year?

    I did not wish to convey the point that extremely. If you stand out at your school and take advantage of your opportunities, you will not be overlooked simply because of your school's history. My point was that your school's history is helpful as a rough indicator.
  • vonlostvonlost Super Moderator Posts: 31,712 Super Moderator
    ^ Well, I look at the big picture of the numerous first-hand reports of ED FA success we see on these pages, coupled with the lack of first-hand reports of problems with the process, and conclude that applying for FA at ED time can be appropriate for those with a dream school when they don't care about comparing FA packages from various schools.
  • xiggixiggi Registered User Posts: 25,441 Senior Member
    Vossron, I believe that applying ED is an extremely valid path, and perhaps the best alternative for students with extremely low EFC.

    Where we do not seem to agree is that a student should either accept or reject the offer of admission by the deadline imposed by the school. The ED should not offer students the right or time to negotiate packages and play games using the imprecise language of the Common Application as their fig leave.
  • LightSourceLightSource - Posts: 745 Member
    What ends up being self-reported on the Application apart from AP scores? Extracurriculars and volunteering?
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Registered User Posts: 12,496 Senior Member
    What ends up being self-reported on the Application apart from AP scores? Extracurriculars and volunteering?

    Extracurriculars (which are grouped with volunteering), AP scores, and awards are only self-reported. However, admissions officers will attempt to independently confirm any outstanding achievements. SAT scores and the like are also self-reported, but you must send in score reports for the scores to be considered.
  • stef1astef1a Registered User Posts: 420 Junior Member
    I have a question for silverturtle about the admission process: I am a Harvard legacy student. One of my relatives is a Harvard alumni (he went there for college) and he has donated millions of dollars to the school. How can I exploit him to my advantage (rec. letter?), and if I did so, by how much would it increase my chances of getting in? (it sounds very diabolical saying that, lol).
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Registered User Posts: 12,496 Senior Member
    ^ What is the relation?
  • LightSourceLightSource - Posts: 745 Member
    ^Ok thanks! What would you consider an "outstanding achievement"?
  • LightSourceLightSource - Posts: 745 Member
    How can I exploit him to my advantage
    I laughed hard. :p
  • stef1astef1a Registered User Posts: 420 Junior Member
    He is a cousin of mine/my mother's*, I believe.

    *[more related to grammar than to me being a legacy, but, in this context, would it be mother's, mothers, or mothers'?]
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Registered User Posts: 12,496 Senior Member
    What would you consider an "outstanding achievement"?

    This will vary from school to school, from admissions officer to admissions officer, and with the ease with which the claim can be checked. USAMO, for example, can easily be checked online, so they will likely attempt to confirm that (MIT says that they always check this). Likewise, awards in other major competitions can almost always be and usually will be checked.
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Registered User Posts: 12,496 Senior Member
    He is a cousin of mine/my mother's*, I believe.

    Then you will likely receive nor or little benefit in the legacy sense, but submitting a positive and seemingly informed recommendation from a big donor can provide a huge boost.
    *[more related to grammar than to me being a legacy, but, in this context, would it be mother's, mothers, or mothers'?]

    You can write cousin of my mother or cousin of my mother's. Both are acceptable.
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