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Choosing another language?

2

Replies to: Choosing another language?

  • TheDadTheDad Registered User, ! Posts: 10,225 Senior Member
    I'm always glad I took French as it has allowed me to appall native French speakers many times over the years. "Ces Americains, ils sont fou et, malheureusement, ils parlent le fran
  • je_ne_sais_quoije_ne_sais_quoi Registered User Posts: 714 Member
    TD, qui
  • Lost in translatLost in translat Registered User Posts: 394 Member
    TD: Mais non, mais non, les fran
  • McPucks1357McPucks1357 Registered User Posts: 388 Member
    Non parlo francese, ma perche` ho studiato italiano posso capire che avete scritto (piu o meno).

    I'm also thinking of switching languages (from Italian to German), but am interested in some of the upper level italian classes (such as film).
  • je_ne_sais_quoije_ne_sais_quoi Registered User Posts: 714 Member
    Whoops! Freudian slip, no doubt.
  • minimini Registered User Posts: 26,431 Senior Member
    My d. was an Italian Studies double major, and loved the department. She also took German (in preparation for graduate school), and it turned out to be terrific, though less intense than Italian. (But she got the equivalent of two years of credit at her Ivy graduate school for the one year of German she took at Smith.)

    She ended up taking Italian serendipitiously. She took the French placement exam and, to her surprise, placed into the second year, so she decided to try something new. It was a fateful decision. Now she has three useful languages in grad school (though she still needs medieval Latin).
  • CarolynBCarolynB Registered User Posts: 1,068 Senior Member
    Mini, could you please refresh our memories? What graduate work is your daughter doing at Princeton? Early music? I'm not sure I've ever known precisely her interest.
  • smithiegrsmithiegr Registered User Posts: 243 Junior Member
    I took Latin, and I highly recommend it (Maureen Ryan is one of my all-time favorite professors, hands down). If you need to take it just for background requirements, one year should suffice; it is a very intense course, and since you focus strictly on grammar and reading (very little speaking is done, though Maureen insists on more-or-less correct classical pronunciation), you get through A LOT. By the end of the year, you should have a pretty solid grasp of classical Latin. With the help of a dictionary, there is a lot that you can read.

    My friend, who is a German Studies major, and I have compared our intro level classes, and we think that one year of Latin is equivalent to two years of German. This is probably not as true and scientific as it could be, but it makes sense given the foci of the two classes.
  • minimini Registered User Posts: 26,431 Senior Member
    "Mini, could you please refresh our memories? What graduate work is your daughter doing at Princeton? Early music? I'm not sure I've ever known precisely her interest."

    Her major interest is 17th century Italian opera (the birth of opera). She is doing a dual degree in musicology/Italian Renaissance Studies. Her other interests tend toward earlier (though she does 20th Century Italian music as well.)
  • CarolynBCarolynB Registered User Posts: 1,068 Senior Member
    Thank you, Mini. What a wonderful, rich combination of studies! Language can lead into all kinds of directions that we'd never even dream of.
  • TheDadTheDad Registered User, ! Posts: 10,225 Senior Member
    Agreed. I can get lost in several different languages and can't sing well, according to some, in several as well.

    ===

    LiT:
    ...leur charmant petit accent...

    Petit? Mais mon accent c'est grand, ou peut etre "grossier", comme un vache Russe, n'est-ce pas?
  • je_ne_sais_quoije_ne_sais_quoi Registered User Posts: 714 Member
    My daughter would be happy to share her experience with the Spanish classes she took last year, as well as her impressions of the the professors, and department in general.

    She tested out of the more elementary level classes, was one of the only first-years in the upper level classes she took. This presented an unexpected difficulty. The first-years register last so both semesters the Spanish classes she wanted were already full when it was her turn to register. Fortunately she was able to finagle her way into the classes by writing the professors, attending class, and remaining when other students dropped.

    If you would like to talk to my daughter, send me a PM and I will put you in touch with her.
  • IheartbooksIheartbooks Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    I have taken four years of Latin in high school, but it was done at a slower pace. Did you take the latin placement test or know anything about it? I want to continue Latin and take classical Greek. Do you think this would be too much on my plate?
  • TheDadTheDad Registered User, ! Posts: 10,225 Senior Member
    If you're considering something like a Classics major, I think they would assume that you'd be taking both Latin & Greek. Assuming you place out of the year-long Latin I, you can probably do both languages at the same time...I wouldn't want to start both languages at once.
  • mythmommythmom Registered User Posts: 8,305 Senior Member
    S is a classics major at Williams. Yes, Latin and Greek. Some Classical Studies Programs allow you to focus on just one language.

    He had two AP's in HS so he started on the highest level of Latin literature and is starting Greek.
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