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Introducing a New Expert Content Section: Careers!

STANFORD planning on a 68% yield rate this year

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Replies to: STANFORD planning on a 68% yield rate this year

  • yayverilyyayverily Registered User Posts: 222 Junior Member
    I tend to agree with Chillaxin. What Dean Shaw was quoted as saying in the Senate minutes was "This year, 16% of kids who had straight A's didn't get in." I believe this was either an unintentional misstatement on his part or on the part of the person who wrote up the minutes (although one would think that a tape recorder would have been used for accuracy).

    What he should have said was "Of those who were accepted, 84% had a straight-A average" which I interpret (based on other data I have found) to mean at least a 4.0 weighted GPA, where the weighting was done in an as yet unexplained but consistent manner known only to Stanford admissions staff. This is consistent with the March 31 news release, which states that, for those admitted, "nearly 80 per cent have a grade point average of 4.0 or higher."

    The correct interpretation is still a bit troubling to me as it implies that grades are all viewed the same, regardless of your high school. If you subtract out those for whom the admissions staff might overlook a non-4.0 GPA (sports stars, URMs, special legacies), then the percentage of those remaining with at least a 4.0 GPA is even higher than 84%.

    Which brings me back to my first point: If you don't have a 4.0 weighted GPA, don't waste your time applying. You will not get in. Of course, it would be helpful to know exactly how Stanford computes that weighted GPA. I recall reading something somewhere that AP and IB courses are weighted, while honors courses are not. Anyone?
  • TetragrammatonTetragrammaton Registered User Posts: 392 Member
    Here's something that might clarify:

    For Fall 2004, 62% of all applicants and 79% of all admitted students had a 4.0 or higher weighted GPA, according to the counselor newsletter available at http://www.stanford.edu/dept/uga/pdf/CounselorsNL_Web.pdf

    It's perfectly understandable that this rate has gone up by 5%.

    It also disproves the idea that "GPA is all that matters", since the >4.0 group had only a 7% advantage in acceptance over the 3.8-4.0 group. In fall 2004, that is.

    So there's hope after all?
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Which brings me back to my first point: If you don't have a 4.0 weighted GPA, don't waste your time applying. You will not get in.

    I don't think your point makes sense- what if you go to a high school without any weighting and you get one B? I say apply if you want- you just might have some quality that they're looking for, and one app's time and $50 dollars is not that big a deal for most in the long run- the potential benefits could be huge and the very small. Just don't expect to get in.
  • chillaxinchillaxin Registered User Posts: 965 Member
    Judging from the link that Tetragrammaton posted, you can see that it says that in 2004, 17% of those with a GPA above 4.0 were accepted. Hence, the 16% statistic would make a lot of sense if you change the word rejected to accepted. :]
  • yayverilyyayverily Registered User Posts: 222 Junior Member
    Thanks for clarifying--finally what sounds like a plausible explanation of the comment made. So Dean Shaw's comment "16% of kids who had straight A's didn't get in" should read instead "16% of kids who had straight A's did get in." That certainly changes the message quite a bit, eh? Hopefully you can appreciate why I was concerned (that concern is greatly reduced if the statement is flipped around to its opposite, as suggested). I was simply jumping to conclusions based on what now appears to have been erroneous data.

    Anyone know whether the GPA in that table is weighted, and, if so, how it has been weighted? (the table doesn't say one way or the other). For a student at a school that does not award A+'s, for example, achieving an unweighted GPA of 4.0 requires perfection (since A=4.0), and that seems unlikely. If 62% of all Class of 2008 applicants had a GPA of 4.0 or higher (as the table shows), it certainly suggests that the GPA is weighted (or else there are a lot of schools that give A+'s).

    If the reported GPA's were weighted, then I would hope/expect that they were weighted by Stanford in a consistent manner. I am also wondering if freshman year grades are included as I seem to recall reading somewhere that they are not considered. Reporting a GPA without any explanation of how it was derived is just too murky for me. Please tell me which grades were included (should be all but might be some), and how they were weighted (AP vs. IB vs. honors)....especially when a difference of 0.4 in GPA makes such a huge difference in acceptance rates, as shown in the table.

    Is there a Stanford admissions person who can lay out the facts here on this GPA that's being reported? I did notice that the Class of 2007 news release (put out in 2003) stated that "more than half (of those admitted) have an unweighted grade point average of 4.0 or higher". That's the only year I could find that the reported GPA was specified as "unweighted", and in other years (such as this year) the percentage reported to have a 4.0 GPA has been running much higher, 75-80%.
  • TetragrammatonTetragrammaton Registered User Posts: 392 Member
    An unweighted GPA of 4.0 or higher? That sounds unlikely, but who am I to say?

    Perhaps a lot of schools in California offer A+ grades? I'm from NoVa, and an unweighted 4.0 would require perfection over here.

    And it seems likely, as further clarification, that when he says "straight As", he means a WEIGHTED GPA of 4.0 or better. That's what would be in line with the stats on the counselor packet.
  • chillaxinchillaxin Registered User Posts: 965 Member
    At my school at least, a perfect unweighted GPA is 4.0. Anything higher means that it's the weighted GPA, which is what I infer from his "AT LEAST" a 4.0.
  • MIT2010MIT2010 Registered User Posts: 251 Junior Member
    back to the original topic: so, when will Stanford post its percent yield status for the admitted students this year? When did it post the statistics last year?
  • MOTOPHOTOMOTOPHOTO Registered User Posts: 109 Junior Member
    College Board 2005 DATA( SATs Sent)

    State Sford Harvrad yale
    CA 15500 4500 4100
    MA NA 3500
    OR 700
    WA 1500

    What this suggests that Sford only get about 5000 applications from rest of the country.
  • MOTOPHOTOMOTOPHOTO Registered User Posts: 109 Junior Member
    yields breakdown for Stanford:

    total applicants 22000
    admits 2400( 11%)
    metriculants 1600
    yields overall 67%

    By region West Coast
    Applicants( CA,OR,WA) 18000 (85% of 22000) College Board 2005 SAT
    Admits 1000( rate 6%) Estimate
    Metriculant 800 50% of class
    Yield West cOast 80%

    Rest of the World
    Applicants 4000 by diiference
    Admits 1400( 35%)
    Metriculants 800
    Yield others 57%
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