ACT w/o writing high. ACT w/ writing low. The age-old question.

<p>The story is this: I took the ACT for a state requirement and received a 31. Not too shabby and honestly a point higher than what I was expecting. Soon I realized, however, that most of the colleges that hold my interest require the writing section. A little peeved at this I bit the bullet and took the test once more, this time with the writing. Now, without any excuses, though I'm almost positive I messed up my bubbling in the science (it dropped 7 points), I made a 29. The time has come where I can only take one more test before EA or ED. Realistically, would a college look at both even if they require the writing section? Some places like Duke and Vanderbilt (my top picks coincidentally) will look at all scores and require only one taking of the writing section according to their websites/admissions staff. But, supposing I would like to apply to other top programs, the difference between a 29 and 31 is immense. If I can't score higher due any unforeseeable occurrences, I'd be pretty bummed. Has anyone had any experience with this dilemma, or taken the time to speak to a college about it? I've scavenged the boards, the internet, and even college sites themselves and have come up with mixed reviews. I'm thinking of maybe making a list for others in this situation, or at least having a definite answer and a reference to anyone who has the question.</p>

<p>Take the SAT and do very well on it ... Send the SAT scores as appropriate to the colleges that accept either ACT or SAT. Most colleges accept either.</p>

<p>A few of the upper-tier colleges have an ACT or SAT I and SAT Subject tests policy. I'd rather not have to go two separate Saturdays for both. My SAT was M:620 CR:720 W:580. Pathetic, yes, thus I'd rather use my better ACT score if possible.</p>

<p>Does anybody have an answer?</p>

<p>Look into seeing what schools will super score your scores. For instance, MIT will only look at your best scores. So let's say you got 31-31-30-30 the first time and 29-29-31-28-10Writing MIT will take 31-31-31-30-10. </p>

<p>A good amount of schools are allowing superscoring, it's a good idea to check.</p>

<p>It goes on a college by college basis. I'm in the same situation(33 w/o writing, 31 with it, reading dropped by 8 points so i also think misbubble) and all I've ever been told is to call the admissions office of the colleges I'm applying to, and that's about all you can really do because I've never seen anything helpful on any website about this problem.</p>

<p>Unless you can find the info on the college's website as to whether it will consider an ACT w/o writing if you also submit one with writing to meet its ACT w/writing requirement, your only option is to call the college and find out. There is no list for this anywhere and most colleges put nothing on their sites about the issue and have said nothing about it publicly. I know UIUC considers the one w/o writing as long as you meet its requirement to submit one w/writing. I have been informed Yale does not.</p>

<p>Sweet, thank you guys. I figured I wasn't the only one who had the question. I know it might be a bear, but I'm seriously considering making a list for everyone by calling as many offices as possible. It should settle the question once and for all, and be a heck of a lot easier for people searching.</p>

<p>Colleges</a> that super score ACT | College Admissions Counseling</p>

<p>there you go.</p>

<p>Superscoring is fine and dandy, but I'm more interested in those who require the writing but will consider the ACTs without the writing. An example is Duke, who, as I've been told, will not change your composite, but will take the highest subscores from any test, w/ or w/o the writing. Or Vanderbilt (though they don't use the writing as a test standard, only an essay verification) requires only one test with a writing and will take the highest composite. It's sort of a more grey area I think than flat superscoring.</p>

<p>Ummm, 1920 SAT ~= 29 squarely.</p>

<p>Duke doesn't superscore the ACT as far as I know and requires writing for ACT. I don't see how this is even a choice for you.</p>

<p>If you aren't willing to devote your time to retake both ACT, SAT, and/or Subject Tests, maybe you shouldn't apply to some of these colleges.</p>

<p>"An example is Duke, who, as I've been told, will not change your composite, but will take the highest subscores from any test, w/ or w/o the writing. Or Vanderbilt (though they don't use the writing as a test standard, only an essay verification) requires only one test with a writing and will take the highest composite."</p>

<p>That's the definition of superscoring. Don't worry, if they super score they will look at your highest subscores and your only writing sore.</p>

<p>"For students who choose to submit the ACT with writing, Duke will consider the highest composite score and highest sub scores on each section, regardless of test date, but will not recalculate the composite score."</p>

<p>Taken right off of Duke's admission's page;)
That means I keep the 31, and all the highest subscores, which I did raise in a few areas the second go. Duke's middle 50% is 30-34, meaning it's a reach, sure, is it but absolutely crazy that I'm applying? Far from it. But thanks noob for your encouraging words.</p>

<p>I've gotten so many definitions of superscoring that it seems like there isn't a standard at times. It's just annoying to me that some schools don't allow ACTs w/o writing when it doesn't affect the composite and won't superscore it, but will for the SAT. I could then rant about how dumb the actual section is though, but that'd take up too much room.:)</p>