Chance me (MIT, Caltech, UCLA)

<p>Just Finished Jr Year. Want to major in Engineering or Computer Science. Hopefully MIT, Caltech, Harvey Mudd, or UCLA</p>

<p>SAT
-2290 Composite
-800 M
-770 CR
-720 W</p>

<p>ACT
-33 Composite
-32 Math and Science
-33 English and Writing (7 essay)</p>

<p>SAT IIs
-Math 2: 770
-Chem: 740</p>

<p>PSAT--I won "Program Recognition" (top 50,000), and I find out in Sept if I got any further (Commended Scholar, Semifinalist, finalist)</p>

<p>GPA
-4.68
-4.0 Unweighted
-Number 1 in class</p>

<p>APs
-World History: 5
-AP Chem: Awaiting Score (Likely 5)
-APUSH: Awaiting Score (Likely 5)
-AP Calc AB: Awaiting Score (Likely 5)
-AP Spanish: Awaiting Score (Likely 4)</p>

<p>ECs
-A captain of our school's robotics team (in which we won 2nd and 6th place regionally)
-Participated with Math Club to take Math Competitions sponsored by a University.
-Cross Country Varsity Runner</p>

<p>MIT: Your 800 on M makes you on par with the average for MIT, and your 770 on CR makes you a bit higher for the average. You're in the middle for your W score though. Either way, it's still a reach, considering how selective it is. Of course, there's a chance that they'll consider you. If they call you in for an interview, do NOT screw it up. The smartest guy at my school was rejected because he messed up his interview.</p>

<p>Caltech: About the same chance as MIT. Sans the interview.</p>

<p>Harvey Mudd: Still a reach. A slightly lower reach than Caltech and MIT, but a reach nonetheless.</p>

<p>UCLA: I'd say you have a pretty good chance of getting in (it'd be a lot harder if you're out of state though). Just write an awesome personal statement.</p>

<p>Thanks Kagami. Any good engineering "Match" schools come to mind? I'm also considering UCSD and UCSB.</p>

<p>If you have the money to go to an OOS public, check out UIUC, your stats will get you money most likely but you for sure will get in.</p>

<p>You can consider applying to Baylor U. You should be able to get in, and the online application is free so I'm sure it wouldn't hurt. I'm not sure how good of an engineering school it is though.</p>

<p>Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is specifically an engineering college that you should be able to get into as well. The online application for this college is also free. Seems kind of expensive though. Same for Kettering, but Kettering is less expensive.</p>

<p>I'm sorry if I'm not very helpful with this. I don't really know much about engineering colleges, and I focus mostly on California so the only engineering school that comes to mind is Cal Poly. If you're considering UCSD and UCSB (which I'm sure you can get into), you should also consider Cal Poly, especially if you prefer hands-on learning.</p>

<p>If you live in California, SJSU would be a good safety. Apparently their computer science and engineering is actually pretty good. You don't have to say, but which state do you live in?</p>

<p>I will be honest with you.</p>

<p>Based on you academic credential and ECs that you described,
MIT and Cal Tech will be major major reaches for you unless you have some hooks.</p>

<p>Mudd: Reach</p>

<p>You need to have more schools on your list.</p>

<p>I actually think you got a decent shot at MIT.</p>

<p>Overview:
Valedictorian
2300 SAT (Rounded ;D)
Ok sat II's the math might hurt you a tiny bit
Fairly good Ec's, though nothing amazing average MIT</p>

<p>20more, thanks for the input, but I'm not sure why they would be major major reaches. I understand that schools of that nature are pretty much reaches for everyone, but my SAT Scores are around 75th percentile at MIT (except for W, which is around 50th). My SATIIs also both fall within the 25th and 75th percentile range at MIT. Not to mention that I'm valedictorian with a perfect 4.0.</p>

<p>So, what I'm really trying to ask is this: what, in your opinion, would make those schools less of a reach?</p>

<p>Eh, I know a guy that got into Mudd with like 2150 SAT... FIRST Robotics I assume? Eh, we got 4rth place in SD, I don't think that will help much TBH...</p>

<p>What is your State, race and gender?</p>

<p>To the OP: </p>

<p>Your ECs are weak for MIT and Caltech.<br>
And for Caltech, the SATII's are weak. With the generous curve, you should be getting an 800 on the math SATII. For the other SATIIs, you should shoot for the 770-800 range.<br>
Caltech may be possible if your recs say you're the best student they've ever seen. There's a couple sticky thread on the Caltech board that say what they are looking for.</p>

<p>MIT may be a reach, but you may get in depending on how you present yourself.</p>

<p>You should get in UCLA, but I've heard UC admissions is kind of random these days. I have no personal experience with it though. </p>

<p>I would apply to schools in between UCLA and MIT and/or other reach schools. (How about Carnegie Mellon?) Your excellent SAT and GPA will merit you a look wherever you apply, but you don't have much there in the EC department, so it will be very tough for you to get MIT-level schools.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Thanks Kagami. Any good engineering "Match" schools come to mind? I'm also considering UCSD and UCSB.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Why not Berkeley? </p>

<p>UIUC is excellent in comp sci. Michigan is also an excellent engineering school.</p>

<p>I have known many kids who got rejected or waitlisted from MIT and Cal Tech. They all had incredible numbers and “good” ECs and “honors”.</p>

<p>If you do not have any hook, you are competing against academic superstars or national (or international) level award winners (<- hook I guess).</p>

<p>This is what I have witnessed.
Cal Tech: Male with MAJOR AWARD (Siemens or Intel) got accepted and few STEM oriented FEMALES got accepted.
MIT: Few STEM oriented FEMALES got accepted. Male (similar stat as yours) from LOW INCOME FIRST GENERATION family got accepted.</p>

<p>You will have better chances if you are a female.
You will have better chances if you are from one of those less represented area.
You will have great chances if you are a URM.
You will have better chances if you are from low income or first generation family.</p>

<p>Collegealum314 described it best.
“Caltech may be possible if your recs say you're the best student they've ever seen.”</p>

<p>You should apply to MIT and Cal Tech but it will be difficult unless you have some hooks.</p>

<p>^^I agree with the above, except that I'd like to point out that Caltech doesn't have affirmative action. And they don't care about geography or low income/first generation status.</p>

<p>Thanks for all the input everyone. I'm thinking of retaking Math II in October to see if I can get it up to 800 (I know I could have; left 5 blank because I didn't realize how fast I needed to go).</p>

<p>Of course, I'm looking into other schools, but those were my "Dream Colleges" and just wanted to know if I had any chance of acceptance. I should get great recs from 2 AP Teachers (1 humanities; 1 math), with whom I've personally associated with in outside-of-school activities.</p>

<p>What collegealum314 said is only partly true. There is no affirmative action at Caltech.</p>

<p>HOWEVER, if you have a lack of ECs, and it's because you're from a geographical area that doesn't have the same kind of opportunities for ECs as, say, NYC, that will be taken into consideration. Similar logic if you are first generation, or if you are low-income and had to work during high school (thus making ECs impossible). </p>

<p>HOWEVER #2, Caltech's CORE curriculum is very difficult, so Caltech will not admit anyone who has not shown that they can handle the work, no matter how many mitigating circumstances they may have had for bad grades/test scores, etc. It would be a disservice to that student to do so.</p>

<p>To the OP: Your scores and grades are within range for Caltech. Your ECs are light, but don't necessarily disqualify you. I would concentrate on making sure your essays show that you have a true passion for math and science, and making sure you have teachers lined up to write recs who know you well.</p>

<p>MIT-waiting list. Caltech-Accepted. Harvey Mudd-accepted. I also have to ask what school you go to. If it's one of the best change all of those to accepted. On the other hand if it's poor performing change all to wait listed.</p>

<p>
[quote]
HOWEVER, if you have a lack of ECs, and it's because you're from a geographical area that doesn't have the same kind of opportunities for ECs as, say, NYC, that will be taken into consideration. Similar logic if you are first generation, or if you are low-income and had to work during high school (thus making ECs impossible

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Right, I should have clarified this. My point was they don't give you points just for being from an underrepresented region. They take whoever they think will be the better student. If someone has less ECs because they have to work, they take that into account.</p>