Community colleges give credit hours?

<p>Do they?
For example if I take the CLEP and get a few credit hours and if I apply to a community college will it reduce the number of hours I have to take or does that only work with universities?</p>

<p>I can't speak for all community colleges, but the one I attended did grant credits for CLEP exams. I think most do. Here's the link to my college's policy on them: NCCC</a> - Transfer Credit Policies & Procedures</p>

<p>In my experience CCs are more liberal with the CLEP credit than 4 years.</p>

<p>Hm.
NotAClue, lets say that they do reduce the number of hours I take if I prove a certain score in my CLEP exams, will the 4-year-university that I will transfer to eventually, create problems for me since they require a CERTAIN NUMBER of hours to be taken at a college to be able to transfer? Or will they accept the fact that CLEP gave me some credit hours?</p>

<p>Several things can happen with CLEP results.</p>

<p>1) If the community college awards you credit for the CLEP, and you can use that credit to complete part of the requirements for your associates degree, then any place that you would transfer to that accepts you as a junior transfer because you have completed the associates degree automatically accepts those credits for whatever it was that the CC accepted them for.</p>

<p>2) If the community college awards you credit or advanced placement for the CLEP, and then you take higher level courses in that subject, even if you don't complete a full associates degree, or if the place you transfer to doesn't award direct junior status because of the associates degree, if that college/university accepts your higher level classes for transfer credit, it is almost certain that they won't ask you to go back and take the class you skipped because of the CLEP. </p>

<p>3) Sometimes the college/university that you transfer to has a different policy about CLEP exams, and you will be able to get more credit for a particular exam than you would have at the community college. This seems to be particularly true of the various English exams. </p>

<p>If you are going to begin at a community college, spend some time researching that CCs articulation agreements with 4-year schools as well as its credit-by-exam policies. In addtition to AP, IB, and CLEP exams, most community colleges will also award credit for other exams such as UExcel</a> - College Credit by Exam and DSST</a> - GetCollegeCredit.com Your best chance of having all of your CLEP and other exams count toward a degree, will be to use them toward an associates degree that is part of an articulation agreement.</p>

<p>"will the 4-year-university that I will transfer to eventually, create problems for me since they require a CERTAIN NUMBER of hours to be taken at a college to be able to transfer?"</p>

<p>Are you thinking of a particular college/university here? I don't know of any that have that kind of requirement. Even if there is a requirement like that, nothing is stopping you from taking that particular number credits. Your transcript will list all courses separately, and there will be a note indicating if it is credit awarded for an exam just like there would be a note if it is transferred credit.</p>

<p>Well for example UF won't accept any transfer applicants with less than 60 credits. If you CLEP'd 5 and actually took 55 I think that would still count. You should speak to the people at the 4 yr first though.</p>

<p>And many schools, especially privates, don't care if you get an AA and won't automatically give Junior standing so checking with the place you want to end up really is the best move.</p>

<p>
[quote]
...then any place that you would transfer to that accepts you as a junior transfer because you have completed the associates degree automatically accepts those credits for whatever it was that the CC accepted them for.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Happymomof1 goes on to explain articulation agreements, which are not universal. Not all four-year colleges accept associate degree graduates as juniors. You have to check this for your state and for the schools you are attending/want to attend.</p>

<p>In Maryland, the articulation agreements are not as good as they could be. Some states--like New York--have had agreements in place for decades for students who complete associate's degrees at SUNY schools. This is definitely a buyer beware situation where you must do your own research for the schools you are attending.</p>

<p>The minimum credits that the OP is referring to may be something where the four-year school said re-apply after so many credits.</p>

<p>happymomof1, I'm speaking generally about the required number of hours. An example is University of Texas at Austin (I gave this example many times haha). UT</a> Austin Automated Transfer Equivalency System </p>

<p>It says "Some UT Austin programs limit transfer credit in the major. All programs require completion of at least 60 semester hours in residence at UT, and no more than 6 of the last 30 hours applied toward a degree may be transfer credit." </p>

<p>That's what I was talking about when I mentioned "CERTAIN NUMBER of hours".</p>

<p>MD Mom you said "Not all four-year colleges accept associate degree graduates as juniors."
That scares me a bit. What do you mean by that? If I study 2 years at a community college I might not be accepted as a Junior when I transfer to a 4-year-university?</p>

<p>If a student attends a community college (my experience with this problem is in Maryland) and does not attain an associate's degree, the four-year college the student transfers to can evaluate each course to decide whether it will accept it for credit. The way to avoid this dilemma is if you know where you want to transfer, check the university Website to determine what classes it will accept from your community college. All of this information should be available on-line.</p>

<p>I recently heard of a young man who attended another Maryland community college and wanted to transfer to a Midwestern university (Kansas, I think). Fairly late in the process, he learned that because the Maryland CC did not have an accreditation recognized by the Midwestern school, none of his credits would transfer.</p>

<p>Community colleges often have the articulation agreements with colleges in the same state. These agreements guarantee that a young person who has completed the two-year degree will have the credits transfer and enroll as a junior. The articulation agreements vary WIDELY, so do be sure to check out what your state does. I hope that this makes sense to you, OP.</p>

<p>"Some UT Austin programs limit transfer credit in the major. All programs require completion of at least 60 semester hours in residence at UT" </p>

<p>When you get to UT you will need to complete at least 60 hours worth of credits.</p>

<p>"no more than 6 of the last 30 hours applied toward a degree may be transfer credit." </p>

<p>Once you are there, you can still pick up some additional transfer credits if you need to for your degree. For example, you might need to take a class somewhere else during a summer session, or you might pick up some non-UT credits during a semester abroad. But the amount of credit allowed for upper division courses is limited.</p>