Overwhelmed: Which colleges are worth investigating?

<p>I have narrowed my list down with the help of my school college guidance center. We have: </p>

<p>Carnegie Mellon Univ<br>
Chapman Univ<br>
Coll of Charleston<br>
Columbia Coll
DePaul Univ
Emerson Coll
Kenyon Coll
Loyola Marymount Univ
Loyola Univ New Orleans
Oglethorpe Univ
Scripps Coll<br>
Skidmore Coll</p>

<p>My unweighted GPA is a 3.95. I plan on majoring in Creative Writing/English. I would like to have the options to take lots of different types of classes, but I still the like the intimacy of smaller colleges. Is there any one college to definitely avoid? (I was leaning away from Oglethorpe.) I feel a bit overwhelmed. I thought Columbia College or Emerson might be fun. But I always have my doubts. Note: Are any of these colleges significantly more conservative? I am very liberal and would prefer to go to a liberal school since I have pretty much attended a conservative school all my life.</p>

<p>First...to assuage your thoughts about liberal universities and stuff...literally NO COLLEGE besides BYU or something can be considered conservative to a noticeable extent. Even the most conservative colleges in America have staff that is significantly liberal. No need to worry about that really. </p>

<p>Obviously you should be looking into liberal arts colleges. Considering what you have said, I don't think Carnegie would be a good fit for you nor the Loyolas.</p>

<p>


</p>

<p>Seems like #3, #6, #7, #9, #10 in this</a> list of "exceptional" schools have rather conservative environments. There are also other schools with conservative environments like Liberty, Oral Roberts, and Bob Jones. The OP would probably prefer the schools in the "train wreck" list (or other "red light" schools from that conservative-oriented site).</p>

<p>You have a list and it's in your best interest to just start digging in and doing the research on the schools. Pick one and go through the different reviews and its website and note what appeals to you and what doesn't. Once you've done all the schools, look at the list and you'll probably find some things more important to you than others.</p>

<p>Based on what you want I'd suggest a close look at Kenyon.</p>

<p>That exceptional school list is pretty weird, US News is the standard for rankings.</p>

<p>That site is specifically to look for schools with a politically and religiously conservative academic, political, religious, and social environment (though some of the listings are arguable as to whether they actually are).</p>

<p>Obviously, if you do not want such an environment, you can invert the rankings and ratings.</p>

<p>^^ US News is not necessarily the "standard" for rankings. Princeton rankings have some interesting lists including some targeted at politics and life style. College</a> Rankings I do agree the "exceptional school" list is not well substantiated. Princeton at the top? Must be because of the free market. West Point listed but not the other academies? Why Gordon College - because it's the only evangelical college in New England?</p>

<p>I have narrowed my list down with the help of my school college guidance center. We have: </p>

<p>Carnegie Mellon Univ<br>
Chapman Univ<br>
Coll of Charleston<br>
Columbia Coll
DePaul Univ
Emerson Coll
Kenyon Coll
Loyola Marymount Univ
Loyola Univ New Orleans
Oglethorpe Univ
Scripps Coll<br>
Skidmore Coll</p>

<p>==============</p>

<p>First of all, many GCs do not take affordability into acct when helping kids make college lists. GCs either assume that FA will be generous or the family will pay whatever's needed.</p>

<p>and, if you attend a private HS, then your GC may be assuming that your family will pay whatever it costs.</p>

<p>Many of the schools on your list do not meet need. also, you may not qualify for much/any aid - depending on family income/assets.</p>

<p>If you haven't already done so, sit down with BOTH parents and ask them how much they're willing to spend each year on college. It sounds like you go to a private high school. If so, your parents are used to paying tuition and will likely know if they can afford to pay much more than what they're currently paying. :)</p>

<p>Sometimes parents wrongly assume that their child will be given LOTS of merit scholarships and/or financial aid. </p>

<p>Make sure that you have a couple of financial safety schools on your list. These are schools that you LIKE, and you know you'll be accepted, and you know FOR SURE that you have all costs covered. </p>

<h1>If your parents tell you that they will happily pay $55k per year for your college costs, then awesome...you'll have lots of college choices. If your parents won't pay that much, then you'll need to consider that issue when applying.</h1>

<p>My unweighted GPA is a 3.95. </p>

<hr>

<p>What are your test scores? how did you do on the PSAT?</p>

<p>=========</p>

<p>. Note: Are any of these colleges significantly more conservative? I am very liberal and would prefer to go to a liberal school since I have pretty much attended a conservative school all my life.</p>

<hr>

<p>I agree with the poster who said that most schools are rather liberal...even the ones who may seem more "conservative". The profs are usually mostly all liberal. The schools that are often the exceptions are the bible colleges and other more ultra-conservative Christian colleges.</p>

<p>Most Catholic colleges are rather liberal except for a few social issues like abortion.</p>

<p>I'm not an expert in Catholic colleges, but I believe the ones that are run independently (such as by Jesuits) tend to be more liberal than the ones that are more under control of the local archbishop. One indicator is to look at the required classes. If they require you to take a couple course in comparative religious thought and ethics, great. If they require you to take 2 courses in standard Catholic theology, not so great.</p>

<p>I would guess that CMU is a university where you will not find a great amount of liberal and political thought and discussion, simply because many students and profs will be more technologically oriented. </p>

<p>I think you will find more political discussion at a college where a higher percentage of students are headed to law schools.</p>

<p>If you really want a place with liberal political discussion, look at American University in DC. However, I don't know what their english/writing program is like.</p>

<p>We can't really give you suggestions for colleges without knowing at least GPA + test scores. If you get a good ACT/SAT score, you'd probably want to look at all the schools listed in the "Top Liberal Arts Colleges" section of this site, and do your research to find out which ones are most renowned for Creative Writing/English (though honestly it would be hard to go terribly wrong at any LAC with such a common major like English).</p>

<p>charlieschm, CMU has many programs beyond technologically oriented ones. My engineer husband graduated from there in the 70's. He had a friend even then who was a creative writing major, a roommate who was a set design major. I had friends there from high school -one was a guitar performance major,the other was an art major. The drama department is famous and has many well known alumni including Steven Bochco,Holly Hunter,Rob Marshall,Ted Danson,Jack Klugman,etc. CMU may not be right for this particular student and it may end up not being affordable but it does have many different kinds of majors.</p>