Should I bring up a controversial extra curricular on my application?

Yes, you need to “sell” yourself, but no, the AOs are not looking to sell you a car. Ofc, If your essay is ‘you lot are everything that is wrong with world’ well, that’s not going to sell you.

Post #6 leads me to think that you are making the same mistake that many posters make about their essays: they focus too much on telling their story (of abuse, coming out, passion in life) and not enough on showing where that story is going. What have you learned from your activism so far? what have you done with that learning? how have you adapted / changed / grown? based on that, where do you see yourself going? how will that activism be used? The point is to sell you, not the specific cause. You should be able to write the essay and substitute [generic cause] pretty easily.

I remember your story now…IMO the way issue will be your age, lack of prerequisites, finishing HS in one year etc. - not this activity.

Agreed and think thats a great way to put it. From previous posts you are a very driven teen with a narrow focus and goal. It shouldn’t be about just selling yourself as a current snapshot but rather showing how what you have done so far is going to make you successful in reaching your goal. You say you want to be an investment banker so how has your time in xyz EC’s and your classwork thus far shown you will be capable of doing this. Hearing another story about a smart homeschooled teen entering college early isnt all that exciting or special. They want to hear why you’ve made the choices and done the things and how this has made you an excellent candidate for their college and life in general.

@happy1

The Age Discrimination act of 1975 prohibits discrimination based on age in College Admissions. If there is reasonable evidence that they deny me because of my age, the university will very likely find themselves in a lawsuit.

I think it would be “lack of maturity” that would be the deciding factor, not your chronological age.

@MaineLonghorn

Possible, but if the essays and extracurriculars do not show a lack of maturity then they have no reason to suspect me being immature.

Now they could claim that the reason is a lack of maturity but that could easily be interpreted as age if there is no evidence in the application to prove immaturity by a judge.

@Homeschooler14, it would be next to impossible to prove age discrimination unless it were at a school where you should be an auto-admit. “We just didn’t find his essay as compelling as that of the other students we admitted” is a perfectly legitimate reason to turn you down.

@Sue22 If its a very selective school then yes you are correct. But say it was a school such as ole miss (and many more), with my 35 ACT there is no reason for Ole Miss to reject me. I think I could definitely prove age discrimination in that case.

Review CC. There are hundreds of posts about students with perfect grades and amazing EC’s who get declined from colleges. All having nothing to do with their ages. Per your example, Ole Miss has about an 83% acceptance rate. That means that even some “great candidates” get declined. Rigor of high school curriculum is reviewed and they could be declined based on that as well. I dont see anything on Ole Miss website that states “If you get a 35 on your ACT you are guaranteed entrance”. Im happy to be wrong though.

Maturity is knowing how to present oneself in the best possible way and being honest. You asked about if you should list the EC or not and only you can answer that question. Depending on how you frame it, it could be a huge benefit or quite frankly mean nothing at all.

I think that unless the school admits people solely based off of stats, or has auto-admit policies, it would be near-impossible to prove age discrimination. They could say that they thought your personality doesn’t fit what their looking, or that you didn’t demonstrate enough interest in them, or something else like that. Even just on this site, you can find posts where people were accepted to t20s, but were rejected from their safeties.

@2plustrio No, there is nothing in their website that says if you get a 35 you are automatically in. But you have to consider who the school usually admits. Ole Miss has rejected very very few applicants with 35 ACTs and the very few that they did reject likely had some other flaw.

I am a student with a 4.0 unweighted GPA, 35 ACT, very high SATII scores, 4s and 5s on AP exams and I did this in a rigorous course load. There is absolutely no reason why I should be rejected from a school like ole miss. Yes my Extracurriculars are slightly better than mediocre but still not terrible.

Repeating this, read CC and you will see that many amazing students are rejected from what they would consider “safeties” and it has NOTHING to do with their age. You even admit that Old Miss does reject people with academic stats like yours but you still think you are above and beyond that for some reason.

Again, not going to argue with you. Read through some of the advice above on how to use your EC’s in a way that may highlight your successes and goals. I dont think simply listing NYR as an activity is going to gain a ton of “points” and tip the scale in your favor. Using NYR to showcase how its made you a better student, person, potential future investment banker, then that might be helpful to you.

Apply to the schools you are interested in and deal with the acceptances and rejections like the thousands of other high school graduates do.

How are you going to get into investment banking from Ole Miss? I’m rusty on what the exact target schools are, but I don’t think it’s one, maybe apart from boutique shops in Charleston or something.

Investment bankers value soft skills immensely, and they prize people who succeed progressively in conventional ways. Jumping the line on college might not be the best move if that is your goal. Now if it was tech you were after, that might be a different story.

https://catalog.olemiss.edu/admission describes University of Mississippi’s admission criteria. Note, however, that there is a section about “Admission of Students Who Are Not Graduates of Regionally Accredited High Schools” that applies to home schooled students.

Not interested in arguing. Apply and see what happens.

Also, I believe you said you were taking classes at a local college so you may be viewed as a transfer student wherever you apply which has a different set of requirements than a typical incoming freshman may have.

@2plustrio Yes I am taking classes locally but I am still not considered “graduated” so I can still apply as a freshman.

But may I ask, are freshmen admissions or transfer admissions usually more selective? Would it benefit me if I get 15 or 30 credits done here and then tried to transfer? Also, does dual enrollment help my resume for freshman admissions?

It truly depends on the college how they deal with dual enrollment or transfer credits/applicants. At some colleges the transfer acceptance rate may be higher than incoming freshman rates (Vanderbilt perhaps for example). To get your dream job, college choice matters.

I feel like transferring may be a better option for me because colleges will be taking much less of a risk by accepting me once they see that I have made good grades in a year of college. What do you all think?

Transfers tend to get less financial aid than entering freshman. What can/will your parents pay for college each year?